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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1998

September/October 1998 $500 says this becomes your favorite farm animal. Ram ft| The New Dodge :••"•" ■ ' -I'. ' -.. BSfc . f it ; -■•''■' ■■•■•;. ~: ..■s.%xu/$>- ,<>—,-.•••:• sMsa?^ '.-• *" a i#''. •;•.•"•«. -•: v ■'. ••/' -. II . or www.4adodge.com Cash Back to Fann Bureau Members We're betting you're going to like having Dodge trucks on the farm. So we're giving eligible ' Tllls ca - sh back o,lcr ls valld f ° r members Farm Bureau' members $ .500 cash back on all new 1998 and 1999 Ram Regular, Club, and ~s Quad Cab" pickups. You can choose from our full line of Magnum" engines, too, including the suhK h lt '" 11 l,lJ > no |>' u «d in V-6, V-S, V-10, and Cummins Turbo Diesel** We're also offering $ 500 cash back on 1999 Dakotas cert!ticTte certain othe/speciai with a Magnum V-6 or V-S engine. And even our Ram Vans and Ram Passenger Wagons are programs Ask tor restrictions and details r I J I I if/1/, 111 .no . .nn , i • , ~, ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1998

Farm Bureau News Three die in farm accidents Richmond—Three men were killed in separate farm accidents in Virginia in July. The first accident occurred July 7 in Augusta Countv as a T « 71-year-old man unloaded a tractor from a trailer. The tractor rolled off and threw him to the ground and he died. The second accident was in Wythe County on July 24 when an 85-year-old man attempted to start an older model Ford tractor. He was not on the tractor, and it was left in gear as it started, and it ran over the man. The third fatality occurred on July 30 in Southampton County. A 36-year-old man was working with an irrigation line reel. He reached Into the reel to retrieve an oil can as the machine was being rolled out onto a field. He got caught in the wheel and was pinned and crushed by the machine. To report farm accidents, cal* the Virginia Farm Bureau at 804-784-1476. Convention's focus is future farming (Continued from page 1) is so uncertain, we wanted our convention to address some ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1998

September/October 1998 You can be a kid again at the fair By JASON DOWNS Special to the Farm Bureau News RICHMOND—Get ready for games, animals, rides and music. The State Fair of Virginia will be Sept. 24 to Oct. 4 and the theme Is "For The Kid In You!" This year's state fair just might bring out the kid in all of us. The Racing Pigs are back, along with the petting zoo, a live shark show, nightly fireworks, Young MacDonald's Farm, horse shows, cows, sheep, goats and much more. Don't miss the fair's animal nursery, where Virginia Tech veterinary students explain how it works, and the Dairy Farm on Wheels. The Virginia Lottery Center Stage features Virginia entertainers, wacky contests, the crowd-pleasing Dennis Lee Show, and Virginia Lottery Game Shows as well as a nightly show featuring Lady Luck and her "family." This year's stars performing at the Classic Amphitheater include: John Michael Montgomery, Chely Wright, Patti Loveless, Restless Heart, The Coasters, Drifters and Platte...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1998

Farm Bureau News ui EPA closely scrutinizes major ag pesticides (Continued from page 1) cides are used and registered." Some key chemicals that farmers use on crops have been in use for 40 years. All chemicals now in use on U.S. crops have been approved by EPA. Some of the same chemicals that farmers use on crops are also used by consumers on lawns and gardens and inside their homes. "Pesticides are among the most thoroughly tested products in the world," said a report from the American Crop Protection Association. "Each EPA-registered pesticide undergoes 120 or more tests designed to determine the human health, safety and environmental effects." In the environment, key pesticides break down quickly through the action of sunlight and moisture into harmless by-products, said an AC PA report. EPA restrictions already prevent insecticide application to a crop for a certain number of days or weeks prior to harvest. In the past, EPA looked at pesticide levels chiefly from dietary risks, ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1998

September/October 1998 Growers depend on pesticides for livelihood By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor JARRATT—"There's no way I could farm without some pesticides," said Billy Poarch, a Greensville County grower. He produces 1,000 acres of crops each year, including peanuts, cotton and soybeans. Farmers must use pesticides, as well as other methods, such as crop rotation, to protect their crops, said Wes Alexander, a Cooperative Extension agent in Southampton County. "If they let nature have its way, they'd go bankrupt," he noted. in reality, some pesticides cost hundreds of dollars per gallon, and most farmers use as little as possible, Poarch said. He recently sprayed a fungicide on a field of peanuts and sprayed only 7 ounces per acre. The pesticide was greatly diluted with gallons of water before it was sprayed, which is standard. Like an increasing number of today's farmers, Poarch uses a tractor with an enclosed cab and an onboard computer that precisely monitors the appli...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1998

Farm Bureau News ' 4 "^S; EPA closely scrutinizes major ag pesticides (Continued from page 1) cides are used and registered." Some key chemicals that farmers use on crops have been in use for 40 years. All chemicals now in use on U.S. crops have been approved by EPA. Some of the same chemicals that farmers use on crops are also used by consumers on lawns and gardens and inside their homes. "Pesticides are among the most thoroughly tested products in the world," said a report from the American Crop Protection Association. "Each EPA-registered pesticide undergoes 120 or more tests designed to determine the human health, safety and environmental effects." In the environment, key pesticides break down quickly through the action of sunlight and moisture into harmless by-products, said an ACPA report. EPA restrictions already prevent insecticide application to a crop for a certain number of days or weeks prior to harvest. In the past, EPA looked at pesticide levels chiefly from dietary ri...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1998

September/October 1998 Growers depend on pesticides for livelihood By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor JARRATT—"There's no way I could farm without some pesticides," said Billy Poarch, a Greensville County grower. He produces 1,000 acres of crops each year, including peanuts, cotton and soybeans. Farmers must use pesticides, as well as other methods, such as crop rotation, to protect their crops, said Wes Alexander, a Cooperative Extension agent in Southampton County. "If they let nature have its way, they'd go bankrupt," he noted. In reality, some pesticides cost hundreds of dollars per gallon, and most farmers use as little as possible, Poarch said. He recently sprayed a fungicide on a field of peanuts and sprayed only 7 ounces per acre. The pesticide was greatly diluted with gallons of water before it was sprayed, which is standard. Like an increasing number of today's farmers, Poarch uses a tractor with an enclosed cab and an onboard computer that precisely monitors the appli...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1998

Farm Bureau News Migrant workers add millions to economy By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist BLACKSBURG—Migrant, seasonal and H-2A workers are an integral part of Virginia's economy. That's what a government study revealed. The total value of migrant and seasonal farmworkers' wages spent in Virginia is about $51.6 million, the study said. "I'm not surprised at all," said H. Bruce Richardson Jr., a Northampton County vegetable producer who hires about 30 migrant workers from Florida each summer. "When you have 1,000 people that come into a rural area from June until October, it's a big boost to the economy." "The Economic Impact of Migrant, Seasonal and H-2A Farmworkers on the Virginia Economy," was a $35,000 yearlong study conducted by Virginia Tech's Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics. It focused on the economic activity that would be lost if no migrant, seasonal or H--2A workers were available to Virginia farmers. Migrant workers are legal U.S. residents wh...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1998

September/October 1998 Citizens help police catch marijuana growers (Continued from page 10) camera, but we haven't lost one this year," Petska said. "I lost a sensor, but we later got it back from the guy." August and September are prime harvesting months for marijuana, Petska said. However, some growers wait until October. "They don't believe in harvesting their crop until after the first frost because they feel the frost locks in the THC inside the leaves," he explained. THC or tetrahydrocannabinol is what produces euphoria in users. In addition to using high-tech equipment, state police also rely on observant citizens to report suspicious activity, such as vehicles repeatedly parked in an out-of-the-way area; people walking into the fields and woods, especially if dressed in camouflage clothing and not hunting; the sound of talking, power saws and gasoline-powered water pumps being used to pump water to plots, and signs of some- Fair tours enhance ag image (Continued from page 7...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1998

Farm Bureau News Where do the candidates stand on On Nov. 3, Virginians will be asked to go to the polls and cast their vote for II members of Congress. In voting, voters are both exercising civic responsibility and doing their part to shape the future of agriculture in Virginia. The people who are elected this November will be making decisions that will affect the way Americans all live and work for years to come. Farmers are a small minority today in Virginia, representing less than 2 percent of the Issue 1 On May 21, 1997, the House passed, 333-99, the 1998 fiscal budget resolution (HCon.Res 84). Adoption of the resolution sets in motion the plan agreed to by the White House and congressional leaders, which would balance the federal budget by 2002. The plan would cut projected spending by $308.1 billion and provide a net tax cut of $85 billion, leaving a net deficit reduction of $204.3 billion over the next five years. The resolution allows $139.1 billion in cuts from discretiona...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1998

September/October 1998 Court proceeding. HR992 is constitutionally flawed because the Court of Federal Claims does not have the power under the constitution to invalidate Acts of Congress. Response to Question 1 I voted for estate tax and capital gains tax rate reductions in the Taxpayers Relief Act of 1997, and IRS Reform Act of 1998, which reduce the period investors must hold stocks, bonds, or other assets to qualify for the most favorable capital gains tax rate. I support fair reductions which sustain our ability to live within our means and give farm families the opportunity to stay on the farm. Response to Question 2 I voted in favor of HR922 when it was considered by the House. Although the legislation has not been acted on by the Senate to date, I hope it will be enacted into law and fully address this issue in a fair, balanced manner. I need to hear from farmers, the members of my Farmers Advisory Board, and the Virginia Farm Bureau about whether this bill achieves that goa...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1998

Farm Bureau News (A Free Service to Members) Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau News accepts classified advertisements only from members of the Virginia Farm Bureau. One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each member. If the ad runs more than 15 words, then the member must pay $5. Ads over 30 words will not be accepted. I Payment MUST accompany order. Check only, NO CASH accepted. Make checks payable to Virginia Farm Bureau. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please TYPE your ad and mail to: Farm Bureau News Classifieds, PO Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. You may fax to 804-784-2588 or e-mail to cvand@vafb.com. t Classified ads WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. I DEADLINE: Ads must be RECEIVED (not mailed) by the 10th of each month preceding the publication month. The September and October issues are combined, as well as the December and January issues. The deadline for the September/October issue is August 10 and the deadline for the December/January issue is November 1...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1998

September/October 1998 The Formers Market (Continued from page 14) 2 bath ranch, plus cottage. $99,500. 804-983-4961 LOG HOUSE — 15 acres, 6 acres lake, double garage, $225,000. Call 804-332-7353 James Edwards. LOGHOME — Skylights, central air, secluded, ponds 131.1 surveyed acres, $ 149,000 540-726-2975 Giles county. FOR SALE — Small cabana on Hatteras Island. Good rental income on ocean, great fishing. 804-694-0161. MATTAPONI DEEP WATER — Acreage, tranquil estate setting $ 148,500. Owner finandng, CB Virginia Country Nancy 804-725-9605. FOR SALE — I acre wooded land. 3/4 mile out east Ruritan Road, Roanoke County. Call 540-366-6465. THREE ACRE FARM HOUSE ~ 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, wood floors, Century 21 at the Beach. 800-538-8386. BRICK RANCH FOR SALE - on beautiful wooded lot. 3 miles from Bedford City limits. 4 bedrooms, paved drive, and separate workshop. 540-586-1870. $130,000. RICHMOND COUNTY COTTAGE ~ TVvo acres, boat ramp access, Rappahannock River $35,500. Fletcher Real Est...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1998

T^j^JVjWk Volume 577 Number 8 7/ie Voice of Virginia's Agricultural Producers ERIC MILLER/FBN Protecting crops Peanut grower Billy Poarch adds water to a pesticide for peanut plants. Government officials are looking at outlawing many important crop protectants. See stories about farmers' reliance upon pesticides on pages 1, 8 and 9. Over 12 Health Insurance Plans To Choose From. Not everyone has the same Medical needs... Choice: Plus not everyone has the same budget for Health Insurance...That's why Virginia Farm Bureau offers a Choice of Health care programs and options. Why pay for coverage you do not need? Best Value Now you can choose a plan which will give you the coverage you j For Your Dollar: need... and will fit your budget. We believe quality protection and personal service go hand in hand. \ N .| Personal Service: With over 100 local Farm Bureau offices throughout Virginia, \ personalized service can be as close as your own community. Jp | Broad Range of 0 jf y OU are unc...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1998

Farm Bureau NewsM^ Volume 57, Number 9 Wayne Ashworth to retire in December By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—C. Wayne Ashworth, known by peers for his "calmness" and "excellent leadership," is stepping down as president of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. After 10 years as president, Ashworth will retire in December so he can spend more time with his family. He became a member of the VFBF Board of Directors in September 1973. He and his wife, Lib, have three grandchildren ranging in age from 2 to 4. Ashworth plans to spend plenty of time fishing with his grandchildren, he said. "Wayne Ashworth has been great to work with as the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation president," said U.S. Rep. Virgil H. Goode, D--sth. "He has been a real friend to agriculture, and I have appreciated his insight and helpful advice on a number of different farm issues, both at the state level and the national level. We will certainly miss Wayne Ashworth's leadership and hard work. "His grea...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1998

Farm Bureau News Apple butter, peanuts, cider offered in gift boxes By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist RICHMOND—Some of Virginia's tastiest agricultural products are being wrapped up in a gift box just in time for the holidays. The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's Service Corp. has begun a new gift box program, featuring food items made from Virginia agriculture products. "We stole the idea from Georgia Farm Bureau, which has been real successful with its Georgia products gift box program," said J.B. Atkinson, Farm Bureau's warehouse manager and coordinator of Virginia's program. Virginia Farm Bureau is offering two gift boxes this year: a Virginia sampler; and a peanut variety pack. The sampler, which costs $17.95, plus tax, includes: a 12ounce can of salted, gourmet Virginia peanuts; a 4-ounce bag of peanut brittle; an 8-ounce jar of honey; a 9-ounce jar of apple butter; a 10-ounce jar of strawberry preserves; and a 6.3-ounce bottle of sparkling apple cider. The produc...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1998

November 1998 Agriculture reshaped into complex system Agriculture is being reshaped into a complex global food system. While production agriculture provides a solid foundation, issues such as the international business climate, worldwide consumer needs and the application of technology increasingly will shape the food system of the future. For the past year and a half, more than 50 members of the Purdue University faculty have been assembling a landmark research report highlighting factors that will impact farmers and ranchers in the 21st century. Much of that research was outlined Sept. 28 during a Purdue seminar for international agricultural journalists sponsored by New Holland. Despite trends showing the growth of agricultural productivity has fallen over the last 40 years, production will continue to Farm economy mirrors stock market this year As Republicans and Democrats wrestled over a farm aid package on Capitol Hill, Lafayette County, Ark. farmer Glenn Brackman looked at h...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1998

Farm Bureau News WJM •Vi;,J" iW®S&£ .' Hl £■> JHSkg^^^E^^Bmß r " 4. igfr <Ms - H- Orchards: Researchers study ways for better profitability Editor's note: This is the last of a series about Virginia's 12 agricultural research and Extension centers operated by Virginia Tech. By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor WINCHESTER—An orchard can be a battlefield, pitting growers against voles, deer, fungi, insects, mites and harsh weather conditions. Perhaps the Virginia grower's best line of defense is the Alson H. Smith Jr. Agricultural Research and Extension Center. For years, growers have contended with voles —mouse-like rodents that chew up apple tree trunks and roots. The center experimented with rodent baits and found these to be more effective and more economical than earlier ground cover spraying methods for killing voles around apple trees, said Dr. Ross E. Byers, center director and professor of horticulture at Virginia Tech. Voles store the newe...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1998

November 1998 New grape varieties promising for Virginia By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor WINCHESTER—High humidity and cold winters remind Virginia grape growers each year that their fruit originated in the Mediterranean where weather is less harsh. Grapes in Virginia face winter damage, spring frost, hail, untimely rains, high heat, drought and fungal diseases caused by wet weather. Growers are constantly looking for better production methods and even better varieties of grapes to combat the challenges, and that's why they turn to the Alson H. Smith lr. Agricultural Research and Extension Center. "The current grape and wine industry in Virginia started in 1980," said Dr. Tony K. Wolf, state viticulturalist, based at the center. A few commercial grape producers were in business before 1980. It was then that state lawmakers passed the Virginia Farm Winery Bill. A big boost came to grape and wine production in f 985 when lawmakers appropriated money to hire a viticulturist, an e...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1998

Farm Bureau News Achievements impressive during presidency (Continued from page 1) "He keeps his temperament well under control and he has a calmness in working with people on problems." "I don't think I've ever seen Wayne mad," said Bruce Hiatt, VFBF vice president. "He's always calm and easy-going, and he's a good listener. He always remembered things that you told him, whether it was personal or business." "He's a person who doesn't show partiality and a person who sees you for what you are," said Helen Neese, a board member and chairman of the VFBF State Women's Committee. "He was always a friendly, kind person willing to listen." When he was elected president at the 1988 Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Annual Convention, his predecessor, Robert Delano, asked him how long he wanted to serve as president. Ashworth told Delano, " 'If I'm not able to do a good job, it will be a short time. If I stay eight years, that will be a good stretch of time.' " But members re-elected him in ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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