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Title: Pacific Rural Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Deadly Weapons and Fire Arms. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

Deadly Weapons and Fire Arms. rProf w E r,riKKn before the Mechanic Arts Oollkoe, ' ( 'lmiii' i> Institute Hall, 8. W. Kaportod exprt-HBly (orthoPKEBS.J Lee. 11., June 10. Thero was tho usual largo attondaneo of students and others on Saturday evening last, to listen to Prof. Welcker's lecture, giving an historical resu me mid descriptive account of deadly weapons of all sorts, ever dovised, including tire-anns, down to thoir recent most effective improvements in tho Henry and Winchester rifles. Amongst tho distinguished visitors on the dais, avo noticed Governor Haight. Slings, axes and swords, ending with the bow, embraced tho whole subject as gono over, down to tho times of the early colonists of America, who must have used the bow largely. In tho uso of tho sling the inhabitants of the Balearic Islands are historically accredited with great reputation for expertnets; and the English were tho most famous bowmen; a man who could not put a dozen arrows into a ten inch pl...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Pyramids of Egypt. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

The Pyramids of Egypt. Among the seven wonders of the world have usually been counted the pyramids of Egypt, but, from late investigations by Mr. Piazzi Smyth, several of the popular ideas concerning them appear to have been erroneous. He regards the Oreat Pyramid of Cheops as the oldest monument in Egypt, while the other pyramids were built afterwards. This is also the largest and finest, and tho only perfect one in architectural design and execution. Nothing has been constructed during the 4,000 years since it was completed that can vie with this colossal pile. Even our largest and finest specimens of architecture are inferior in hight to this ancient relic of the Nile. St. Paul's church, in London, is 3GO feet 2 inches high; St. Peter's, at Rome, 432 feet; Strasbourg Cathedral, 4(58 feet; while the Great Pyramid is between 185 and 495 feet in hight. The pyramids in general are supposed to have been built by successive generations, each layer of the masonry answering to the reign ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
GOOD HEALTH. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

GOOD HEALTH.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Pork and Alcohol Bad for Consumptives. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

Pork and Alcohol Bad for Consumptives. Editobs Pbess. —It has long been known in the highest scientific circles, that two, at least, of the ingredients that go to make up the diet of two-thirds of the people are entirely inadmissible in all pulmonary difficulties—viz:—Pork in one shape or another, and alcohol. I do not propose to enter into any lengthy dissertation, but simply give some facts in my experience that bear upon the point. In 1861, while on my way across the Plains with my. family, bacon was our mainstay; but loosing the larger part of our team near Green River, we were compelled to abandon the heavy wagon and the largest part of our stock of bacon, so that by the time we reached great Salt Lake City, it was all used up. It was well; for by that time a bad humor caused festers to appear at the roots of the nails, so that they all came off, and otherwise endangered the general health, to such an extent that I was not at all sorry that the bacon was gone. From that time un...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Wearing Flannel. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

Wearing Flannel. In the climate of San Francisco, and wherever the cold sea breezes prevail during the summer, flannel ought always to be worn. If the ladies, especially the young ladies of this city, could be induced to regard the laws of health in this particular, many precious lives might be saved; but pasteboard soles, low-necked dresses and lilliputian hats are pretty sure to sow the seeds of a fatal harvest. The sugges tion in the following paragraph from the Scientific American, if followed, might save much sickness and suffering, and not a few from untimely graves :— Put it on at once. Winter and summer, nothing better can be worn next the skin than a loose red woolen shirt;'loose,'for it has room to move oa the skin, thus causing a little tiltillation which draws the blood to the surface and keeps it there; and when that is the case, no one can take cold;' red,' for white flannel fills up, mats together, and becomes tight, stiff, heavy and impervious. Cotton-wool merely ab-...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Necessary Rules for Sleep. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

Necessary Rules for Sleep. There is no fact more clearly established in the physiology of man than this, that the brain expends its energies and itself during the hours of wakefulness, and that these are recuperated during sleep. If the recuperation does not equal the expenditure, the brain withers—this is insanity. Thus it is that, in early English history, persons who were condemned to death by being prevented from sleeping, always died raving maniacs; thus it is also that those who are starved to death become insane, the brain is not nourished and they cannot sleep. The practical inferences are three: Ist. Those who think most, who do the most brain work, require the most sleep. 2d. The time "saved" from necessary sleep is infallibly destructive to mind, body and estate. 3d. Give yourself, your children, your servants, give all that are under you, the fullest amount of sleep they will take, by compelling them to go to bed at some regular, early hour and to rise in the morning the...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Disease and Carelessness. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

Disease and Carelessness. There can be no doubt that carelessness is the origin of most diseases. Medical men also hold that foolish people who follow their own whims have hardly a chance of recovery when visited by serious disease. Nine-tenths of the doctor's work would be done if people were only consistently prudent and cautious. Only it is so hard to be habitually cautious. On abundant occasions a man may be most elaborately prudent, and then, to his utter astonishment, he dangerously imperils his health by some startling impropriety. When he has used every imaginable pains lie is always amenable to the force of accident. There is another plausible theory, antagonistic to the one we have named, to the effect that every man has the seeds of some particular disease in his constitution, and some trifling accident will come, Booner or later, which will have for him the same effect as a match falling upon gunpowder. Medical men explain this on theories of constitutional tendencies or...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Our Weekly Crop. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

Our Weekly Crop. We have placed a beautiful Percheron Horse at the entrance of our ranch, to-day—a very different looking animal from the one of the same breed which was seen there in March last. "Leo," —for by that name we call him—is of pure blood, and shows in a very marked degree his Arabian descent. His long silky mane, fin* eye and ear, and substantial build render hin just the animal we shall need for the long tripswe shall have to make to-day. We will now mount and take a trip to Sacramento to exainim some Fine Sheep, which our friend Mr. Beck, Secretary of the State Agricultural Society hasjust imported, and while there we have an interesting conversation with him about the coming Fair, wherein we are informed that than will bo an Exchange of Fruits between our California and Eastern Growers, for exhibition here and at the various Eastern Fairs. Returning, we spend a few moments, as usual, in our Mechanical and Scientific Library, where we read about a big 35-ton gun and ma...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Comparison of Climates—Interesting Facts. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

Comparison of Climates—Interesting Facts. In the Report of the Secretary of the State Agricultural Society of lowa, for 1870, we find the following statement: "Tho early part of the season, May, Juno, ard July is noticeable for a remarkable drouth which literally burned up the pastures and dissipated the hopes of all, in app'es and pears and tho smaller fruits. Never was there a greater luxuriance of bloom to be followed by a general failure of fruits. Tho drouth greatly diminished the hay crop, but it is of surpassing excellence." Notwithstanding this statement, and which, from our recollection, was confirmed by the facts, as reported by the press of that state at the time; the samo report gives a table of rain fall daring those same months from which we learn that in the month of May, for that year, the rain fall was 3.18 inches, for Juno it was 1.07 inches .md for July 3,72 inchos; the aggregate for the three months being 7.97, or very nearly eight inches. From the same table we ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Comparative Product of Cereals. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

Comparative Product of Cereals. The United States produces more grain, in proportion to population, than any other country iv the world. The Danubian Principality —lloumania, is second in the ratio of production, and European Russia third. According to the census of 1870 the United States, with a population of 81,145,---18(3, produced 1,221,428,452 bushels of grain of all kinds. This was at the rate of 38.2 bushels to each person. Roumania, with a population of 3,864,848, produced 184,439,963 bushels, or just 25 bushels to each person. European Russia, with a population of 61,325,923, produced 1,358,437,500 bushels or 23.1 bushels to each person, while the product of all Europe is 4,583,169,821 bushels, and her population 289,375,284, or just 16 bushels for each person. By tho census of 1850, the United States produced 36.3 bushels for each person then in the country. By tho same ratio of increase in production our census of 1870 will show a product of a little over 40 bushels to th...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Audience and the Lecturers at the Mechanic Arts College. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

The Audience and the Lecturers at the Mechanic Arts College. Prof. Weloker at tho conclusion of the last lecture (on weapons) before the Mechanic Arts College, said: Beforo I leave the stand, ladies and gentlemen of the Mechanics Art College, I desire to thank you very heartily for the patience and courtesy with which you havo listened to my discourses heretofore. My colleagues who have preceded me in this series of lectures havo spoken unanimously' of the very agreeable conduct of this audience. Some of them havo stated that they, havo addressed audiences upon similar subjects in almost every part of tho Union, and they have never anywhere' met with such retpeotfal attention; in short, that they never have had so good an audience as they hud found in tho students and visitors of the Mechanics Arts College in San 'Francisco. [Applause], Now these gentlemen here have addressed you upon subjects which in themselves are of tho highest interest, and of interest to everybody; and if they...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Plowing New Lands—A Query. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

Plowing New Lands—A Query. Soipio Craig writes us as follows, from Riverside, San Bernardino county : Pleaso MMWer through tho columns of your paper the following; or if you cannot, perhaps some onoof your numerous correspondents may have had some experience in such a caso. I am settled on a tract of Government land that bears no evidence of having ever had a plough on it. I desire to sow a portion of it in wheat, this full. The land is a gravelly loam, BUOh as is known as " red land " and is said, around here, at least, to bo of the very finest kind for fruit raising and wheat growing. The point is this :—I am told by parties here that it will not do to plough over four inches in depth for grain the first season, unless the land is summer-fallowed; but aft«r the first year, to plow as deeply as possible. No roason is assigned for the shallow plowing; 1 iiiu simply told that " it don't do well." Will some of our correspondents, who have cultivated new land, give the results of their...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
PATENTS & INVENTIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

PATENTS & INVENTIONS.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Full List of U. S. Patents Issued to Pacific Coast Inventors. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

Full List of U. S. Patents Issued to Pacific Coast Inventors. iFaoM Official RicponTS to PEWEY * CO., U. B.'avii I'OlUaOl* I'ATKNT amentß, AND i'uumbhkbb O» TUX Scientific I'HEKS.] For the Week Ending Mat 3oth. jlachink ron Pkomjcino Rti.hi-.otyi'k-Matkickn —Robert K. Draper, Sacramento, Cftl. ].; N di j i.sh WiuK-ltori: Way.—Andrew Smith Hallitlie, San Francisco, Cal. Kxdi.ksh WlBB'BoPl Way.—Andrew Smith Hallidie, San Francisco, Cal. Mktai.i.k' Paokikg roaStupfino-Boxkb. AH»fit H. Hall and Tlieopliilus Loclut, Siicraiiionto, Cal. Ijami I.—Marks Samuels, Hun Francisco, Cal. Pf.hionh. Ckntku -Viva'K . — Samuel Kellett, Sau Francisco, Cftl. Cf.n ti-k -Tikce. — Samuel Kellett, Ban Francisco, Cal.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The First Telegraphic Instrument. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

The First Telegraphic Instrument. Aii interesting relic of tlm early days of telegraphy dm, it is said, been discovered at Morristoim, N. «1. It is the first instrument by which messages were received ami sent by the aid of tlit! electric current. When Profenof Morse whs experimenting on the power and capability of electricity as adapted to the transmission <>f words, he Spent a largo portion of his tiiuo at Morrisfcows, whero ho was assisted by Alfred Veil, Eaq., a practical machinist and inventor. At the Speedwell iron works of that town, then owned by the father of Mr. Vail, the ttperime&t on the wires and on tho con•traotiog of suitable instruments took place. On the completion of the experiments and tho removal of Mr. Morse to Washington to bring hi* invention before Congress, Mr. Vail accompanied him. and, receiving tho appointment of assistantraperintendent of telegraphs, was stationed at Baltimore at that end of the experiment* ul line The i...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Editorial Notes Eastward.—6. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

Editorial Notes Eastward.—6. Desert, Lake and Mountain. I awoke in the morning in a new region. In the night wo had passed from the grand Sierras, had run along the beautiful IT* iiiilrn from Sun FrMKIICO AUitwie M<«Ueet. Truckee river (the pritle of Nevada and justly esteemed most highly) for some sixty miles, had crossed this stream no less than five times, had left the noble trees and the bounding river behind us. Peeping out of my sleeping-berth window, my oyes met the sun appearing above the mountains east of tho "Great Sink of the Humboldt." These mountains were set in deep blue, the near hills shadowed with brown. Tho waters of the lake at that ,7«mll«from «... Fr.nC.o-Altitude 8.044 ft* instant appeared mirrored with silver with gleams of gold, and beautified with lively colors, with the many harmonizing hues of Nature's grand morning scenes o'er mountain, desert and lake. Probably this view is a rare occurrence, for here I expected to see only a tameless slough a...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
New Publications. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

New Publications. Bancroft's Tormsr's Guide.— Tlie Gey«th- Sun Fraadteo and ironnd Iho Bay; North San Fruncisco. A. L. Bancroft & Co., 1871. This is a neat little duodecimo volume of 220 pages, which provides a complete key to one of the most attractive and won- derful spots of all the wonderful localities in California, and one which, when properly known, will become one of the most popular resorts for tourists upon the Pacific Coast. Nowhere in this" State can so much be seen in so short a time or in so short a. distance of travel, as in and about Calistoga, the Geysers, Clear Lake, etc. The book before us furnishes a complete guide to and through all these localities, as well as full descriptions of the Napa, Santa Rosa, Petaluma, Sonoma and Russian river valleys. It also furnishes a short historical sketch of San Francisco, a topographical description of the city and its surroundings and a complete guide to 300 miliifl from San Frnnclsco -Altitude t.NKi feet. all pla...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE HOME CIRCLE [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

THE HOME CIRCLE BY OUR LADY KDITOU3.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Four-Leaved Clover. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

The Four-Leaved Clover. There was once a poor peasant yonth living on the slope of a beautiful hill, who loved a pi-etty shepherdess who tended her flock far below in the valley, where the grass was greener than emeralds, whore the sun came latest, and from whence it departed earliest. The pretty shepherdess used to raise her bright eyes toward the hill, and wish that ahe might dwell on its slope, and catch the sunbeams a little sooner and keep them a little longer; while the youth would gaze down into the pleasant valley, and think how wonderfully the sun illuminated it. But he had somewhere heard, or read, or dreamed that if one found a. four-leaved clover he might wish for what he would and it should be his; good fortune should follow him all his days and bear him company. Therefore, he gave his Hocks into the care of a younger brother, and set off to find the four-leaved clover which was to endow him with all that was precious -riches, health, and a sweetheart; for though Corydo...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A True Marriage. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

A True Marriage. I believe there are few thoughtful men who have not come to regard as one of the least explicable among the great riddles of the earthly economy, the rarity of well-as-sorted marriages. It might be ho different, ooe cannot help thinking. The, adaptations for harmony so wonderful! The element! of happiness ho manifold and rich? Yet how often—how miserably sometimes —it all miscarries! The water of Paradise turned to fountains of bitterness —the gifts of Heaven turned to curses upon earth ! I do not mean that there are few unions yielding reasonable comfort, friendly relations, a life free from open quarrel or secret heartburning; but I speak of marriage, without flaw or jar—a mat ing alike of tho material with its intangible atlinities and its wondrous magnetisms and of the immaterial principle within that survives the death-change. I speak of a heart-home pervaded by harmony not only unbroken— immutable as that of the spheres; felt to be so by those whom it blesses,...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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