ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: World's News, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
248,232 results
MOSQUITOES DISLIKE KHAKI. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

MOSQUITOES DISLIKE KHAKI.   —♦—       The question as to whether any precautions could be taken to protect travellers from mos- quitoes has led to some experiments at Cam- bridge. These prove that color has a marked power of attracting the mosquito, and that the color which, is by far the most attractive is navy blue. In both services and equally amongst civilians this is a very common, perhaps the commonest, color for male attire. The experiments just quoted show that it is at least equally popular with malaria-carrying mos- quitoes. Light colors were avoided, especially those with a tinge of yellow. Khaki-colored garments would seem to have other advantages besides that of in- visibility on a light soiL

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MEDICINAL EGGS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

MEDICINAL EGGS.   —♦— Eggs are good things. For instance, we are assured that a mustard plaster made with the white of an egg will not leave a blister. A raw egg taken immediately will (sometimes) carry down a fish-bone that cannot be got up from the throat. The white skin that lines the shell of an egg is a useful application for a boil. White of egg beaten with loaf sugar and lemon relieves hoarseness—a teaspoonful taken once every hour. An egg added to the morning cup of coffee makes a good tonic. A raw egg with yolk un- broken taken in wine is often administered to convalescents by the sage physician.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
USUALLY SO. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

USUALLY SO.   George: "A man is as old as he feels." Amy: "How about a woman?"   George: "She is generally as old as other   people feel she is."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
INCREDIBLY MEAN. THE A.B.C. COMPANY AND THEIR CHRISTMAS BOXES TO THE GIRLS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

INCREDIBLY MEAN.   THE A.B.C. COMPANY AND THEIR   CHRISTMAS BOXES TO THE GIRLS.   How poorly the wealthy Aerated Bread Com- pany of London treats its girls in the way of wages has been the cause of public sympathy for years. But the company has just crowned its meanness in the matter of its Christmas boxes (says the "Morning Leader"). It was the custom of the company to give its girls as a Christmas box a bonus equal to one week's wages. This year, on the excuse of bad times, the company has dropped the bonus. But with a kindness which is positively amaz- ing, the company sought to relieve the disap pointment by presenting each girl with half a pound of tea! Some of the girls, it is said, to show their appreciation, returned the "Christmas box" to the company as a New Year's gift, "with thanks." And this is the company which pays 80 per cent., and whose £1 shares are quoted at £14! It is difficult to believe that shareholders receiving so large...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WOMEN DOCTORS A FAILURE. CHICAGO FEMALE UNIVERSITY TO BE CLOSED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

WOMEN DOCTORS A FAILURE. CHICAGO FEMALE UNIVERSITY TO BE CLOSED. Princess Bamha Dhuleep Singh and seventy other young women who are studying to become doctors under the auspices of the North-Western University at Chicago will have to seek another school. After 32 years' trial the trustees of the Uni- versity say that women are not a success as doctors, and that there is no demand for women physicians. The school is to be abolished, and the property sold. One of the trustees, Mr. Raymond, said to an interviewer: "We have run the Women's Medical School at a loss of £5000 a year. Women cannot grasp chemical laboratory work or the intrica- cies of surgery. Fifteen years ago the graduating class of men and women signed a memorial,   saying that co-education was a failure. Then, we conducted the college exclusively for women, and it has been worse than a failure." Dr. Frances Dickinson, Dr. Emulia Holmes Smith, Dr. Sarah Hackett, Dr. Stevenson, and other women physicians vigo...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE EARTH'S HOTTEST SPOT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

THE EARTH'S HOTTEST SPOT.   The hottest place on earth to apparently to be   found on the south-western coast of Persia, on   the Gulf of Persia. There during forty con-   secutive days in July and August the mercury has   been known to stand above 100 degrees in the   shade day and night, and to run to 130 in the   afternoon. In Bahrein Island, which is situ-   ated in the centre of this most torrid part of   the torrid tone water is unknown. Shafts have   been sunk to the depth of 600ft. in search of it,   but in vain.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FORTUNES SACRIFICED FOR LOVE [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

FORTUNES SACRIFICED FOR LOVE       The largest financial sacrifice ever made for a sweetheart was that of Cornelius Vanderbilt, jun., who forfeited twenty million pounds to wed the girl of his heart. It was intended that he should inherit the bulk of his father's vast for- tune, but his choice of a bride changed all that. While a student at Yale he appears to have met Miss Grace Wilson, the daughter of another of New York millionaires. The young lady was eight years his senior, but, whether on this ac- count or not, his father insisted that she was not a suitable partner for him.   The old man even went the length of announc- ing in the newspapers that the engagement of the couple was against his wish, and without his consent. When threatened with disinheritance, Cornelius, jun., replied: "Father, I am going to marry this girl, and the fact that I shall lose 100,000,000 dollars, or all the money in the world, will not make the slig...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
White Slaves. HOW VIENNA RESIDENTS ARE TREATED. SHUT UP IN THEIR OWN HOUSES AFTER 10 AT NIGHT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

White Slaves. HOW VIENNA RESIDENTS ARE TREATED. —♦— SHUT UP IN THEIR OWN HOUSES AFTER 10 AT NIGHT. If English towns, like Vienna, paid tribute to   walk abroad after nightfall, the reign of the   janitor would be short.   Vienna has a form of personal import duty   unduplicated in any other city in the world. It   is the "sperrgeld," or door-opening tax. In- credible as it may seem, the entire population of Vienna, numbering upwards of two millions, are imprisoned in their own homes between the hours of 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. They can only obtain access to or egress from their houses by paying at least 2d to the janitor, or "house master," as the Viennese style him. Vienna is built on the flat system. Millionaires and working classes alike live in dwellings of this kind. The heart of the city is the most fashionable and fancy prices are demanded for living quarters. A landlord may get as much as £150 a year for four rooms ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE HYPOCRITES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

THE HYPOCRITES.   Havers: "Aren't Lovidove and bis wife devoted   to each other?"   Jabbers: "Yes, the hypocrites!" THE LUNAR APENNINES, NEAR WHICH DR. CHARBONNEAU DECLARES HE SAW SIGNS OF AN ERUPTION. The ring, or cup-like, formations, are lunar craters. There is nothing on the earth approaching them in size. These lunar craters are frequently 50 and   60 miles in width. This photograph was taken at the Paris Observatory, through one of their largest telescopes.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A NOVEL MOVEMENT. CATHEDRAL FOB ALL CREEDS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

A NOVEL MOVEMENT. CATHEDRAL FOR ALL CREEDS. With the object of enabling him to carry out the novel conception of a house of prayer "for all sorts and conditions of men," the Rev. Richard Lewis Howell, of Washington, D.C., last month started an American quarterly magazine to be known as the "World Union," edited and published by himself. His ambitious scheme, which he wishes to achieve through the instrumentality of this magazine, is to erect in the capital of the Uni- ted States of America "a cathedral-like edifice, cruciform in shape, with nave and transepts and mural aisles." The primary idea is a house of worship—not a consecrated church—open every hour of the day and night "for Jew and Greek, bound and free," a Mecca for all, irrespective of denomi- nation or creed, who would offer prayer and praise. No religious services will be held until the various religions get close enough together to   admit of a service formulated by representatives from each. The estimated ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Is there Snow upon the Moon. AND CONSEQUENTLY LIFE UPON OUR SATELLITE? [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

Is there Snow upon the Moon. AND CONSEQUENTLY LIFE UPON OUR SATELLITE?   —♦—   Continued observation of the moon from the   island of Jamaica has confirmed Professor Pick-   ering's opinion that snow exists upon our satel-   WHERE THE SNOW HAS BEEN SEEN BY PROFESSOR PICKERING. The position of the supposed snow-covered area is indicated by the longer   arrow on this drawing from a photograph of the moon, which was taken at   the Lick Observatory. The position of the recent disturbance which Dr. Char-   bonneau records is shown by a shorter arrow. lite (says "The Sphere"). Writing from Mande-   ville, in Jamaica. Professor Pickering, who is a well-known astronomer, and head of the Har- vard College Observatory, U.S.A., states that the reasons for his belief that snow exists upon the moon "are based chiefly on the fact that certain brilliant white areas" which he has bee...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Prophecies of Jules Verne. WONDERS OF THE 20TH CENTURY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

Prophecies of Jules Verne. WONDERS OF THE 20TH CENTURY. Jules Verne has been revealing to an inter- viewer his idea of the 20th century. "Our one year-old century," began the famous novelist, "will see things which even the boldest minds cannot anticipate. The period which now opens will particularly revel in what I would call 'scientific sorcery.' The generations now ma- turing, who will soon have totally replaced the men now in charge of the affairs of life, are being educated out of their prejudices. They do not fear. The 20th century will be bold—an era of vast conceptions and realisations. All the efforts in ages of individual and ill-re- warded research are at last to give their full results. Let another brief period elapse, and the telephone and telegraph will seem foolishly inadequate. Your railways of to-day will be laughed at as dangerous, noisy, desperately slow conveyances—as pitiable beside the rail- ways that are coming as are now in our eyes Fulton's steamboat and Ste...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ELECTROPLATE YOUR HALL-DOOR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

ELECTROPLATE YOUR HALL-DOOR. A process of electro-plating wooden doors   with copper, brass, and other metals has just   been invented, so as to produce a door which   has the appearance of a solid metal one, but   which will be cheaper, lighter, and generally   more desirable than if made of solid metal or   covered with sheets, as is now sometimes done.   The finished wooden doors are first vaccinated   with a mixture of linseed oil and resinous   gum, which is designed to water-proof and pro-   tect the wood thoroughly and prevent warping.   They are then placed in a tank containing the   heated filler, which is kept hot by steam.   After the filler has thoroughly penetrated the   wood the door is permitted to drain, and laid   upon a table. It is then rubbed smooth, and   co...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A FAITHFUL PARROT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

A FAITHFUL PARROT. "I heard an extraordinary story of an Indian parrot's fidelity the other day, an attachment to its master, an officer commanding near Bom- bay, having sprung out of somewhat curious ante- cedents. When the bird was quite young his owner found it in the verandah of his bungalow, and as he stooped to caress it the youthful bird returned the caress by burying its small but firm beak in the fleshy palm of his hand. His usual love of animals momentarily checked, he seized the wretched parrot and plunged it in a pail of water that stood handy, with the intention, no doubt, of drowning it. Almost at once, however, the cruelty and injustice of such retaliation struck him, and he withdrew the struggling bird and carefully dried it with a hand-towel. A mu- tual regard appears to have developed from this unpromising introduction, and for months the parrot followed his master all about the barracks, and sat in his chair when he was at meals. Then, in the dry season, a flock o...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
U.S. GOLDEN YEAR. ENORMOUS STOCK EXCHANGE SPECULATION. BANKS' HUGE DIVIDENDS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

U.S. GOLDEN YEAR. ENORMOUS STOCK EXCHANGE SPECULATION. BANKS' HUGE DIVIDENDS. —♦— The year which is about to close (says an "Ex-   press" telegram of December 30) has been remark-   able in many things, but in nothing more than   in the growth of speculation on the Stock Ex-   change.   Much of this is undoubtedly due to the great   movements towards the combination of capital in   advancing industries, and to industrial activity in   general. A large portion, too, is due to sanguine   speculators trying to make a profit out of the   general financial activity.   The quantities of shares that changed hands   were simply stupendous. These aggregate 245,-   000,000, representing property to the value of   £4,800,000,000. Last year the number of shares   sold on the Stock Exchange numbered 136,...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE STORY OF A NUGGET. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

  THE STORY OF A NUGGET.   —♦—   One day a farmer's wife in Ontario (Canada)   went to look in the woods for a lost cow. She   stooped to drink from a spring, and fell against a   small loose rock, which rolled to her feet, and   which proved to be a 20lb. nugget of almost pure gold. The effect of that accidental find was that within six months a city of 5000 inhabitants was built. An immense quarry of purest white marble was discovered near by, and the city was almost entirely built of marble. The town of Bridge- water is the only city in the world that has a hotel, church, schoolhouse, courthouse, and the majority of its buildings constructed entirely of white marble. Strange to say, however, though vast sums of money were spent in search, no other gold of any amount was ever taken from this region, and the city has been depopulated and deserted. All enthusiasm was gone as soon as the gold w...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE SMALLEST PAINTING IN THE WORLD. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

THE SMALLEST PAINTING IN THE   WORLD.   —♦—   A Flemish artist has produced what is said to be the smallest painting in the world. It is a picture of a miller mounting the stairs of his mill and carrying a sack of grain on his back. The mill is depicted as standing near a terrace. Close at hand are a horse and cart, with a few groups of peasants idling in the road near by. All this is painted on the smooth side of a grain of ordinary white corn. It is necessary to ex- amine it under a microscope, and it is drawn with perfect accuracy. It does not cover a half inch square, and is in many respects one of the most remarkable art products of the day.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A GOOD START. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

    A GOOD START.   Young Hopeful: "Pa, is Fairyland a very warm place?" His Father: "Don't know, my boy; never been there myself. But what makes you ask such a strange question?" Young Hopeful: "Well, you see, last night at the pantomime I noticed that the fairies wore hardly any clothes."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
IN SOUTH AFRICA. HOW SOLDIERS ABE MADE. "THE BIRTH OF A BRIGADE." [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

IN SOUTH AFRICA. —♦—   HOW SOLDIERS ARE MADE.   "THE BIRTH OF A BRIGADE."   The Chief was explaining something to the colonel. They paced up and down together for a few minutes, then stopped, and the conversa- tion was as follows:— Chief: "All right; I will soon find you a staff. Let me see; you have a brigade-major?" Colonel: "Yea; but he is at Hanover-road!" Chief: "That's all right; you will collect him in good time. You want a chief for your staff. Here, you (and he beckoned a colonel in palpably just-out-from-England kit, who was standing by); what are you doing here? You will be chief of the staff to the new cavalry brigade!" New Colonel: "But, sir— " Chief: "That's all right. (Reverting to his original attitude). Now you want transport and supply officers. See that depot over there? (nod- ding his head towards the De Aar Supply depot). Go and collect them there—quote me as your authority. There you are fitted up; you can round up part of...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE ORDER OF THE BLACK EAGLE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

THE ORDER OF THE BLACK EAGLE.   The famous Prussian order of the Black Eagle, the chapter of which the Prince of Wales will probably attend during his forthcoming visit to Germany, was founded by the Elector Frederick III., first King of Prussia, grandfather of Freder- ick the Great, on Jan. 18, 1701. The decorations consist of a cross and a star. The cross is eight- THE CROSS AND STAR OF THE ORDER. pointed, and is wrought in gold with blue enamel. It bears in the middle the initials of the founder, F.R., and in the four interstices are four black eagles with gold crowns. It is worn on an orange colored ribbon. The silver star is emblazoned with a black eagle, surmounted by the motto, "Suum Cuique." In one claw the eagle bears a laurel wreath, and in the other a thunderbolt. The founder thus explained the symbolism of the devices:—The wreath is the reward of the good, the thunderbolt the punishment of the un- righteous. "Suum Cuique" expresses universal impartiality, al...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x