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Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Ch... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 28,405 items from Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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BUSINESS COURTSHIP. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

BUSINESS COURTSHIP. All amusing caso was onco decided in a I''rnnkfort polico court. It appoars that a cook, 110 longor quito young, waa courted by a tailor somowhat younger than slio. On Sundays, and occasionally during tho wock, tlio gal lant lover was in tho habit of taking Ilia lady for oxtonded promonades, and visits to restaurants, ivhoro tho lattor always paid tho expenses. Sho also provided him regularly with Ilia supper. l'rcsently, liowover, tho awful truth was brought homo to tho cook that sho was not the only friend on whom tho man of tho scissors and tho noodlo lavished liis affections. Nothing loth, slio went to tho noarest polico court, suing tho faitliloss ono for all tho ox pensos of tho clandostino meals provid ed by hor, and all tho money spent when "walking out" with him. Tho tailor, howovor, waa onca again too mucli for hor. Instoad of trppoaring beforo tlio tribunal as a repontant sin nor, he camo into court with a long bill in his hand, on whieli an account wa...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NEW, ODD, INTERESTING [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

! NEW, ODD, INTERESTING j I Tho llivor Thames Hows at an avor i ago speed of two miles an liour. St. Paul's Cathedral, London, is in Burod for JL; iWJO ,(XX). UuttonR woro first manufactured in Birmingham in 1C8D. At tlio narrowest point tho Straits of Gibraltar aro about 15 miles wido. Women tako tho of nowsboys in Spain, Tho canals of tho Unitod Kingdom \ stretch over tliroo thousand nino liun drod miles. In some cantons of Switzerland all the dead, rich as well as poor, are buried at the public expense. Roasted coffoo and ground coffoo ( boana mixed with lionoy aro used to r rostoro horsos in Germany. The brain of an ant is larger in pro portion to its size than that of any known creature. Tho largest statuo In oxistonco is that of Potor tho Great in St. Petors ' burg, which weighs ono thousand tons. Smith is by far tho commonost namo in England, but in Ireland it comes fifth—after Murphy, Kolly, Sul I livan and Walsh. Out of a population of 52,000,000 in Japan, less than 1 per c...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ROMANTIC HISTORY OF NURSERY RHYMES. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

ROMANTIC HISTORY OF NURSERY RHYMES. Very ancient in many cases ia tho origin of tho nursory rhymoa which liuvo delighted (ho children of ovory land. "Jack and Jill" is supposed to refer to u oompleto amalgamation bo twoon Saxons and Normans, wliilo "Humpty Dumpty" ia Baid to liavo boon a bold, bad baron in tho tinio of King John. Tho "Uabou in tho Wood" had thoir origin in an actual crimo committod in tho tll'toonth con tury, and tho story may bo soon carv ed on a inantlopioco of an nnciont houso in Norfolk. "Littlo Bo-Peop" waa not a maidon, but a holy friar who in Anglo-Saxon daya wont round collecting for tho monasteries. Tho "sheop" roforrod to tho congregation, and thoir "tails" to tho contributions thoy would bring in with thorn. "Tho Houso That Jock Built" was on adaptation of a Ohaldoo hymn, symbolizing ovonts in tho history of tho Hebrew nation; whilo a romantio history attaches to "Littlo Jack Horn er" who waa stoward to tho Abbot of Glastonbury. Tho latter wished to ap po...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FOR YOUNG FOLKS. THE SUN AND THE STARS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

1 fob young folks. __ the sun and the staiis. ii ,vnrk»l so linrd nil duy ?, I';"51;",!; wns tiriMl ami wont to bed: I tlio YOUUl'IitorH out to pl.vy. "1'H j ' 11"ot%omo po.icol" 1.0 ilicii l M" sati I. II Ilin lit llo BtnTS wont cut, S"r emiil, obedient ItUlo olvos, , ,,lk0 *7|1(, rloutlH to pliry about, ; . (,,,iotl.v umuBO themsolvon. , i.it tlio Rt-nra enjoyed tlio bout I; M * ,!L,ing down lo try to sco T1^/!!^v-whito'Stso<lvappilyl i4snfc»A,a} St* -AV 7?„ ?l-ira ran up to any sweot the cliildrou looked in ij boil I s ^ rroli sun boamod: "My starsl" ? hpin olr'as fust ns I enn'G°i J .. L tlio childron put to bod, ;j |jnt I must walto thorn up, you ■\ kllOW 1"

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW TO READ IN BED. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

HOW TO BEAD IN BED. Evorybody who onjoys tho luxury of rending in bod will, wolcomo tlio nowa tliat under tho propor condition!! you can indulge in this Imbit to your lioart's content without i'onr of in juring your oyes. This is tliu conclu sion roachcd by t;ovor:vl ominont ocu lists who havo lwon investigating tlio sul)ject with groat thoroughness. Tlio ehiof dangor in roading in bod thoy found fco lio in tlio fiu:t Hint tho light used is ofton insufficient, and ia so placed as to sliino directly into tlio oyes. Lying in sucli a position or holding tho book in such 11 way that tlio full benoilt is not obtained from both oyes is nnothor danger. Thoro is also tlio temptation to hold tlio book too closo to tho oyoa—a habit which will cnuso nearsightedness—or at an nnglo. But all thoso dangers can bo easily avoided and you can road in bed with tho cortainty that yon aro doing no moro harm than if you woro sitting up. First soleet a book printed from largo clear typo and ono that is li...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
(ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.) OUR STORYETTE. THE AMERICAN COUSIN. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

(All Rianra IUssrybd.) OUR STOEYETTE. THE AMERICAN COUSIN. At JoEn Searlo's suburban dove cote, at Sydenham, a birthday party was in full swing. Tlio flourishing city merchant's only daughtor, Blanche, had oomo of age that day, and hor fond parents hod spared neither trouble nor expenso to make the celebration of the girl's majority as joyous aB pos sible. The drawing-room had been stripped for dancing, and a string band, led by the grand piano, was giving forth enlivening strains at tlio upper ond of the room. Blxncho, hor pretty faoe flushed with excitement, was looking bewitching in a directoire gown of pink silk and white chifton. Her proud mother's eyes hardly stayed long enough from the girl's litho fig uro to exchange tho little stereotyped form of greeting with each arriving guest. Every few minutes Blanche's garo travelled over to the door of tho room, but, apparently unsatisfied, hor oyes began to cloud a little. It was evident that tho girl expected someone, with out whos...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TEACHING HIM ECONOMY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

TEACHINC HIM ECONOMY. "My boy," f;aid tho old man, kindly, as lio poked his head through tho back parlour doorway about 11 p.m., where hia prospective son-iii-luw, Charles, nut courting Eliza with tho gas turned on full forco, "are .you aware that tho moon is shining brightly this ovon ing? .Just 6uo,'' and tho old man turned tho ga« out. "Just observe, my boy, how tho moon's yellow rays light up this room. Truly it is a glorious spec taclo. But como with mo « moment; I havo something in tho cellar which I wish to bIiow you." Then tho old man took his bull's-oyo lantern and led tho way down tho collar stairs, closoly followed by Charles. "My boy," said ho, softly, as thoy readied tho collar, "I know you lovo Eliza with all tho strorigth of your noblo heart, and you lovo to moot her often, and lot mo say that I havo no objoction whatever to your doing so; I simply request your prosoneo in this collar that I might givo you a mueh nocded and usoful lesson in economy. Observe, young man...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHILDREN OF ITALY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

CHILDREN OF ITALY. The Italian children of the poor know very little except what they learn from "Mother Nature," as they work in the fields and vineyards or tend the flocks. The girls are taught straw-plait ing, but even if they do not go to sleep over the shining yellow strands, or throw aside their work to dance and oing-, they can earn very little during the day. Many of them are taught to use the spinning wheels that oncc belonged to their grandmothers; and in Lombardy, where the rich deep green of the mulberry tree is a feature of the landscape, they add to the family store by rearing silkworms. So poor are these little peasants that often in winter time they go to bed at sunset, because they cannot af ford a light; and if it were not for the groves of chestnut trees that are free to all, they would often be very hun gry. Ground chestnut makes good bread when mixed with rye or mai?e, and the meal by itself is used for chestnut cakes, which children think Jelicious, and quite l...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A TRICK. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

> A TRICK. ■* | A,k one of your little friends to 1 „,nd with his back to the wall, and | !"u touching it. Then lay a com ;! thc ground within three feet of I L And tell him he may have it if 1 , can pick it up without moving his ■ |ccis from the wall. This looks as ■' thouch it were J sure gain for thc I bov with his back to the wall; but it I i-n't and you will not lose your penny.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW TO TEST A DIAMOND. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

HOW TO TEST A DIAMOND. The experienced eve does not find it difficult to decide whether a dia mond is genuine or not, for the facets of real ones are seldom so regular as those of fine imitations. With thc.lat tcr the greatest care is taken, in grinding, to polish and smooth the whole stone so that there will be no irregularity in the reflection or re fraction of the light. A necessary tool for testing is the file, which can not scratch a real diamond, although it quickly leaves its mark on an imita tion. Bettor than the file is the sapphire, fur the sapphire is the next hardest stone to the diamond. Any stone that a sapphire can scratch is assuredly not a diamond. If you put a small drop of water on the upper face of a brilliant and touch it with the point of a pencil, the drop will keep its rounded form, but the stone will remain clean and dry. In the case of an imitation, the drop im mediately spreads out. Plunge a diamond into rater, and it will be plainly visible and will glitt...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ADVANCES IN SURGERY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

ADVANCES IN 8URCERY. At a recent Medical Congress, held in London, over GOO papers were road by omincut doctors in tho world, each reporting the progress made in tho different branches of medicino and tmr gory, und suggesting tho linos which may bo followed with udvantago in futuro rosearch. Somo idea of the notuble advanco may bo formed from the marvellous reports in the field of surgery. For instance, tiio human brain has boon laid baro to its re cesses, and such operations which wero considered impossible previously arc now usually conductod. .Many deformi ties which were supposed to bo incur ablo in time past are now remediod. Soino surgeons hope to graft on limbB obtained from persons killed acciden tally in place of those amputated from living people, and promise a time when no one will he compelled to live with one arm or leg. One surgeon describes a process of bone transplant ed by which a hunchback can bo made whole and sound. Anothor spoke of re storing a man, whose heart ...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AMERICAN HUMOUR. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

AMERICAN HUMOUR. Omission.—Teacher: "Mabel in making your 4iV you have omitted something. What is it?" Little Ahfljol: ''Oh, 1 forgot to put eyo-Tn'owB over thorn." # » * « « Ufo Out West.—'Wio judge of a Toxas county wan also cashier of the town bajik. One day a stranger pro hcnted a cheque for payment and his ovidenee of identification was not satis factory. "Why, judge," said the mail, "I've known you to sontcnco men to prison for life on no bot#or ovidenee than this!" ''That may bo truo," re pliod the judge. "But when it oomeB to handing out cold cash we have to bo mighty careful." • # • • • An Important Point.—Travel invari ably adds cliarm to tho conversation of an agreeable person, but sometimes rtiiidor« a boro more tiresome than ever. "And I stood thore, Aunt Bessie," said tho old lady's slow-speaking but long-winded nephew, who had boen talking on incessantly for the past two hours about his summer in Switzer land, until tho old lady's eyes began to droop in tho lamplight—...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ORIGIN OF BOOT-HEELS [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

ORIGIN OF BOOT-HEELS It is beliorod that boot-heols arc of Persian origin, and woro originally at tached to sandals in ordor that the wearers might l;oep their foet above tho burning sands. Heels nino inchoa high have been known. Whon high,' heels woro introduced in Venice thoy were called "chapineys," and woro highly decorated. The height of the "chapineys" proclaimed tho rank of the wearer. \

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CAST COPPER. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

CAST COPPER. I It is now possible to produce cast copper of high electrical conductivity that is mechanically sound. The difficulties of copper casting are due to oxygen, nitrogen, and oxygen containing gases, and this is over come by using boron, which has a high affinity for these gases, but no affinity for copper. Cast copper^, is rapidly replacing forged copper in many of the clectrical arts.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TRANSPARENT VARNISH. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

TRANSPARENT VARNISH. • By dissolving gum copal or gum dammar in the proper solvents trans parent varnishes or lacquers are read ily made. However, it is not generally known that ijie solubility of gum copal in alcohol is greatly increased by first melting the gum. It loses about twenty per cent, water by this treatment and changes its properties. In fact it comes much more soluble in turpentine. It should be melted at as low a temperature as possible or black specks will appear.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BURNING CUBES OF SOLID ALCOHOL. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

BURNING CUBES OF SOLID AL- • COHOL. Cubes of "solid alcohol" are coming' into nse in Germany and to some ex tent in America for cooking, heating curling irons or small amounts of wa ter, and for any purpose which re quires a. small amount of heat; for a short time. Put up in pills or small metal containers, solid alcohol is much more convenient than liquid alcohol, because it can be used on a sheet of metal or asbestos without a burner, and the user knows just how much heat to expect. Some of the cubes are made of GO-per-tfent alcohol worked up in a solid mass, which looks like transparent soap, but the flame is no( clean. Mixed with collodion, the solid alcohol is transparent and more clean ly, but rather expensive. The cheap est and most useful tube is made of sawdust soaked in alcohol and mixed with tar.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE GRAVITY OF A SPINNING TOP. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

THE GRAVITY OF A SPINNING TOP. A spinning top is kept from falling because of the speed with which it revolves. The attraction of gravita tion is temporarily overcome by the centrifugal force produced by the rotation of the top whei) it is spun. Each part of the top is subject to the same centrifugal force as each other part at the same distance from the axis of rotation and to no greater force, so that there is no cause for the top being pulled in any particular direction by the force of gravity. As soon as the centrifugal force begins to lessen because of lessening speed of rotation, the attraction of gravity begins to be exerted again, and the top' begins to wobble. When the spinning motion diminishes to such an extent that the attraction of gravita tion becomes greater than the centri fugal force the top falls to one side.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WELL WORTH KNOWING. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

WELL WORTH KNOWING. Ho had oaly been married six months, but already wore a worried look. An older friend of his, with many y^nrs of matrimonial experience behind ii.ui. asked hiui what troubled him. . "Well, it's like this," ho answered. !"My wife is one of the best in the world, but I'm hanged if I can get her to mend my shirts I" "I suppose/' answered the man of experience, "you go up to her and ask her to mend a shirt for* you when it needs repairing?" "Why, of course, I do!" ;Ah, that's whero you make a mis take! Now, what I do is this. When I find that ono of my shirts wants mending I wave it about a bit, and say to my wife, "This thing's no good, wliero's the rag-bag? ' " " 'You're surely not going to throw that shirt away, are you ?' sho will say. 'Lot mo have a look at it]' " "She takes it, gives one look at it, and says: 'What, throw it away be cause of that littlo Hole ?' And before I can say Jack Robinson she gives me the' shirt back mended. j

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
COMPLETELY OUTWITTED. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

COMPLETELY OUTWITTED. Two largo orchards, sido by side, brought much profit to Farmer Tur mut, mid much trouble, for the orchards were considered fair game by the boys of the village, and two orchards are harder to watch than one. One day, looking from one orchard to the other, Turmut saw a small boy sbin down a treo, and uttering a word of warning to another imp still up among the apples, ran off. Turmut reached that troe in record time. "Got yer this time!" he roared to the boy almost hidden among the leaves. "Como Down!" Getting no answer, and not being in a hurry, ho sat down and waited. Time jmssed, and still he waited, until a servant brought him a: note that had just been dropped through the Iottor-box. He did not wait after he had read it,3 as followB: "Some people 'as apples, some 'as sence. You bin wotchin' a pair of trowsis stuffed with straw, and we bin gettin' your apples from the other orchard. Groat victory for soncel"

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
QUITE A PRODIGY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

QUITE A PRODIGY. A certain woman in ti country dis trict had a little girl who could play a number of lively tunes on tho piano with 0110 finger. The mother doted on this accomplishment of her only daugh ter, and regarded her as a genius. Ono day a lady called, and, noticing tho piano, asked if either of them could play tho instrument. "Oh, yes," said the fond mother, ''Mary plays tho piano." Tho visitor said she would be delight ed if the little girl would play for her. Mary did so, much to the secret amusoment of the visitor, who was a doctor of music. However, as the moth er took such pride in her little girl's "accomplishment," sho refrained from making any discouraging opserrntions. Tho lady then herself played on the piano, giving delightful renditions of Wagner, Mozart, and Chopin. Tho same evening, whon telling her friends of the visit of this lady, tho mother of the "precocious" youngster remarked:— •• "Of course, Mrs. Smith is not a bad player, but not at all as clever as ...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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