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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

n8 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Urged on by the increasing and pressing necessities of our Catholic Indian schools and missions, and in full conson ance with the qordial assent of the late Convention, the Ex ecutive Board therefore begs: i. That this appeal, with such explanatory remarks as may increase its intended purposes, be read at a regular or special meeting of all societies affiliated with the American Federation of Catholic Societies. 2. That the Society for the Preservation of the Faith among Indian Children be established between this date and Pentecost (May 31) in all said societies. 3. That the local presidents appoint, or the society del egate, two or more earnest, zealous and energetic members to canvass the respective societies in securing the enrollment of as many names as possible on the accompanying entollment lists which should be filled as soon as possible. 4. That the membership fees of twenty-five cents should be handed when enrollment is completed to the treasurer of...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

y- THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 119 exaltation of His Church." This is our mission and destiny. May God bless our endeavors. Yours fraternally, T. B. Minahan, National President, Anthony Matre, National Secretary, and Executive Board. Approved: Rt. Rev. James A. McFaul, D. D., Bishop of Trenton, N. J. Rt. Rev. Sehastian G. Messmer, D. D., Bishop of Green Bay, Wis. gaao Wj& Wfi VJy , Easter, Awake, my soul! behold the goal! My bonds are free; Sweet liberty Awake, awake! my soul! 1 Rise thou with Him from death of sin, And with His grace Renew the face Of all thou art within! Behold the tomb! the sinners' doom! 'Tib open wide, And at thy side An angel lights the gloom, Who speaks with cheer- "He is not here" He died for men, But rose again , Rejoice, and do not fear! Awake, awake! for Jesus' sake, Who died in pain But not in vain To set thee free! Awake! P. H. McCauley.

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

120 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE """! Little Sylvanie's Easter. , From the French. V nnr1a fVia r'nrii -.f Tmic Tinrc fr whnm T had yr I been sent to learn latin, said to me one evening: "Listen, James, tomorrow you will serve my Mass at dawn and then we will take the Blessed Sacrament up to Meteline. This is Thursday af ter Easter, and this week must not pass without my good old Homobon receiving communion." This good old Homobon of Meteline was a type of the men of former days, who had always inspired me with great respect when he came down to the village on Fair days and Sundays, in his coarse white serge costume, his high gaiters buckled at the knees, his loose knee-breeches fastened by a box-wood button about the size of a large nut, and a French coat on the collar of which fell a queue tied with a ribbon and his enormous high hat like the gendarmes, except the galoon. But for the last four years, Homobon, because of his great age, and the bad condition of the roads, no longer came down...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

LIT TLE SYLVANIE'S EASTER. 121 sorts of voluntary distractions provoked by a bush upon which a little gold finch had just swooped down, by a dry stone wall over which the lizards ran, or a grass plot on which it would be so delightful to stretch out. But I was patient and consoled myself for the weariness of the climb, by thinking of the delights of the descent, and of the visit to Saint Trinit, which formed the second part of the program. Behold us then, my uncle and I, on the road to Meteline. My uncle seriously intent on his priestly functions, and 1 dreaming of M. Bienteveux's mushrooms while the grey morning sky gradually cleared and the sun, still invisible in the East, but already about to appear above the ridge which hid it, to suddenly spread itself over the valley like a cloth of gold, bathing in its first rays the rosy mountain tops. We stopped from time to time to take breath. That Met eline farm was certainly perched entirely too high, "half way to Paradise," as my uncl...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

122 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. few prayers and we started homeward. Where was Saint Trinit, M. Bienteveux, his breakfast? The day appeared dismal. As soon as we left the house I looked inquiringly at my uncle. "What is it?" he asked, evidently divining my thoughts. "What do you want? James M. Bienteveux will dispense with our company today. We cannot, for a frivol ous amusement, carry the Blessed Sacrament all day on the road, its place is in the tabernacle. Instead of going to Saint Trinit we will return home quietly." How forlorn Trois Tours appeared to me now, and how charming, in comparison, Saint Trinit seemed with its mead ows of blooming Narcisses, and the road through the mead ows along which you were accompanied by the purling of running waters. Really old Homobon might have waited a day longer to die. My uncle became thoughtful, and I believe that at heart he shared my regrets. We had set out again, however, on the high road. At the first turn, under the rocks on which the bee-h...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

LITTLE SYLVAN lE'S EASTER. . 123 and see that they don't get into the hemp-fleld, while I go as far as the house to ask for a piece of bread? My dog, Labri, has eaten up my provisions for the day, and no one ever passes here, so I run the risk of fasting all day till evening." "Fasting! are you fasting Sylvanie, really fasting?" said my uncle. "I am really fasting Monsieur Cure." "You have neither eaten nor drank since supper yesterday?" "I have neither eaten nor drank." "Not a drop of water?" "No, not even a drop of water." "You have not even without thinking, picked a few wild plums, or mulberries along the hedge." Here Sylvanie began to laugh. "It is a long time Mon sieur Cure since the wood-wren stole the last wild plum, and you know well that the mulberries are scarcely red in April." My uncle then questioned Sylvanie in the catechism and seemed deligted to se that she remembered it perfectly. "Perfect, perfect," he exclaimed, and then added: "Provi dence wishes it, the ways of...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

124 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ally rather grave, seemed to unbend and grow young at the thought of again seeing a friend of thirty years his companion at the seminary. He ran with me, laughed and shared my childish enthusiasm over a peculiarly shaped pebble, a curi ous flowering plant, a brilliant, colored butterfly, or an in sect shining like steel. What joy, when, at noon, our appetites sharpened by the bracing mountain air, we caught sight of the belfry of Saint Trinit, the new church in the midst of about fifty little grey roofed cottages like a mother-hen in the midst of her brood. On the foreground stood my uncle's friend, the jovial Rector, Bienteveux, calling out, long before he could see us: "Make haste, you laggards, everything will be burned and I shall be obliged to send you to take a crust at the inn." But nothing was burned, and even now the picture of those visits to Saint Trinit still appear to me through the ap petizing fumes of a piece of lamb, crisp and brown from the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

ADHERE TO THEIR FAITH. 125 ber is authorized by the priest to instruct the other members in their hymns, prayers and catechism and exhort them to lead good lives and hold fast to the faith. At home the members don't forget to recite their morning and evening prayers and before and after meals. 1 told them I cannot account why, unless it be in the Kansas climate, that they are such unwaivering Catholics and lead such faithful Christian lives, as down our way at Sacred Heart, Okla., we have a big house full of . . . priests and , . . . brothers that we see and converse with them every day, and that we have a . . . church, but so far as we Indians are concerned, although good hearted enough, we are far from being Saints that, at any rate, cutting off the hypocrits and infidel mob of us, we have hopes that God Almighty may deign to choose one of our number for His right hand instructor to His peo ple and that is Albert Ne-gahn-quet. J. M. Albert Ne-gahn-quet is a full-blood Pottawatomie...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

126 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. t L , Story of the Resurrection. A) JSC HMUnHM N - i.i pcioi emu uuji wan uuwmcu, a. lie tiuuun uiiii iiait gathered thick and fast over the awful scene of Calvary have noot ..,... U 1 Jl ...... li" 4.1 . : jcioi uttjr, me iicuvy uuikucss mill uuuy inieuiumuy uvci the dread spectacle of suffering and death, the mantle of sor sow and desolation, have been lifted and with the rising sun behold! the Malefactor of Friday rises from the tomb, His body resplendent with glory, His face as the noon-born sun. The earth trembles with joy; and angels hasten to witness His triumphant. "O Death! where is thy sting?" Three days ago you nailed Him to the cross, three days ago you placed Him in the tomb, and sealed the entrance with the governor's seal, and today He rises glorious as the morning sun! "O Death! where is thy victory?" Yes terday He lay cold and stiff in the grave; today He rises full of new life; yesterday you gloried in your victory, today He eludes thy gras...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

STORY OF THE RESURRECTION. 127 the brightness of His resurrection; but they neither heard nor saw any thing. Neither did they know that the Jews had come to Pilate and asked him for a guard to watch the grave and that he should place his own seal ' upon it lest even the soldiers should betray them and deliver the body to His disciples and then say that He had risen from the grave and the whole people believe in the Imposter, and the last evil be greater than the first. Had they known all this they, perhaps, would not have dared come alone to the sepulcher. The tomb is situated about fifty paces from the spot of Crucifixion. It stands about fifteen feet lower than the level of Calvary, to the south. This tradition is substantiated by the words of St. John who writes that the gar den in which the new tomb stood is, "in the place where He was crucified: and the sepulcher was nigh at hand." John: xix. The tomb of our Lord is hewn out of the rock, with an upright doorway between three an...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

128 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. stone had been rolled back by the angel to show them, the guards, and the whole world, that the tomb was empty and that Christ had really risen from the dead. The guards had already returned to the city to tell the high priests what had happened; or were so overcome by fright that they did not show any resistance, or which is more probable, in the second sup position, retired to some distance to see what might yet come to pass. The holy women finding the stone rolled away entered and lo! their sorrow and distress at seeing the tomb empty; for they knew not what had become of the Body of their Lord. While they stood amazed and frightened, looking askance to one another, two men suddenly appeared before them in shin ing garments and bade them: "Fear not. Ye seek Jesus of Nazareth who was crucified. He is not here, He is risen. Behold the place where they had laid Him, nothing remains but the winding sheets in which His body was incircled. Go tell His disciples...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 33 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

STORY OF THE RESURRECTION. 129 city. They feared the Jews might treat them as they had treated their Master. Besides the disciples themselves did not believe that Christ had risen from the dead: "And they hearing that He was alive and was seen by her (Mary Magdalene) did not believe." Mark: 1G-11. And when He appeared to the two disciples walking in the country "and they going told the rest: neither did they believe them." Mark: 16-13. And did not Peter and John run to the tomb to ascertain whether the body of Christ was any longer in the sepulcher, or not? And did not Thomas swear that, unless he saw the marks of the nails in His hands and feet and that of the lance in His side, and placed his hand in His side and his fingers inthe place of the nails neither would he believe? And did not Christ show 'Himself to all the brethren tog ther at one time, eating and drinking and conversing with them, and this during forty days? And could they, 700 as St. Paul relates, have all been decei...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 34 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

130 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. tant sea, rises higher and higher, brighter and brighter, until the whole world is enveloped in her celestial rays. Empires have risen and. fallen, kingdoms appeared and dwindled away; empires shall still rise and king doms still fall but the Church, founded upon the Rock of the Resurrection, shall still stand and flourish, and increase in power and strength as it passes up the aisle of Time the same today, tomorrow and forever ! 9 9 9 Statement of Receipts. The following statement of receipts will serve to make known what the Society for the Preservation of the Faith Among Indian Children has accomplished from October i, 1901 (the date of its inception), to December 31, 1902: Amount collected through the direct efforts of the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions by appeals in Catholic papers, personal appeals, and the efforts of priests who have generously devoted a portion of their time to furthering the interests of the Society $11,989 19 Amount collected i...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 35 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 131 The full amount contributed for the Indian schools by the archdiocese of Philadelphia not including the Lenten collection for Indians and Ne groes is $15,712.36; Father Ganss having secured donations for the schools in general and for particular missions aggregating $6,180.93. These dona tions are not noted above as they have no reference to the Preservation So ciety. f Notwithstanding the fine showing made by this total, it supplies less than one-fourth nf. the amount required for the running expenses of the schools hence the necessity of speedily increasing the membership of the Preservation Society. Took the Cripple's Crutches. One cheerless, rainy night some years ago, the venerable Simon Cameron was sitting in the office of the Ebbitt House, gazing through the window into the fog and darkness. He was lost in thought, and his face was the picture of melan choly. Presently Col. Ingersoll entered. "What has happened, General?1' he asked. "You look as if yo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 36 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

132 13: THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. & Local Paragraphs m. H Coalgate, I. T., will shortly have electric light, ice and cold storage plants. Three railroads are building from Oklahoma City to Coalgate: The Frisco, Katy and Rock Island. Hundreds of cattle were dying last month around Lehigh, I, T.,from a mysterious disease. One farmer has lost over 400 head. The feasts of St. Joseph; St. Benedict and the Annunciation were fittingly celebrated at the Mission by the monks and the congregation at large. The Seneca Indians, living in the northeast part of the Indian Terri tory, have sold all their surplus lands to Mr. John M. Bayless of Cass ville, Barry county, Missouri; consideration $16,000. There are, according to the latest Catholic Directory, 91,192 Catho lie Indians in the United States. They have 124 churchs, attended by 70 priests, ig8 baptisms of adults, last year, and of children 4,385. There are 54 schools with 3,645 pupils. The dove of peace has at last spread its white wings ov...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

The Indian Advocate Vol. XV. MAY, 1903. No. 5 AN OBLATION TO MARY, O Mary, Queen of all creation, Who rulest all from realms of pray'r, By thine own gracious dispensation Make us thine happiness to share, Our hearts so full of worldly pleasure, But void of happiness within, Appeal to thee, their peerless treasure, For grace to triumph over sin. O quench our thirst with Heaven's potion,. This consecrated month of thine, Replenish us with true devotion, And blessings 'round our souls entwine. The Church to thee its homage offers, Its purest flower and sweetest lay, And nature fair most gladly proffers The bounty of luxuriant May. But sinful souls, O Virgin Mother, What signal off'ring can they make? B eside our hearts we have no other, Our hearts we beg of thee to take, - J

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

x34 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 13 f " X 3 Mexico and the Mexicans. - F you wish to enter at once the land of beauty, faith, passion, purity, sun and storm, cactus and rose, laughter and tears, go to Mexico," is the advise of a recent writer. Here one finds the oldest civilization and the newest side by side; here awful montains tower aloft, snow-capped and desolate, gleaming, in the noonday sun; here all is luxuriant splendor and tropical fragrance. It is a new world a wonder-world lying along side of us and, to the great majority of Ameri cans, little known. Its language, its people, its customs, differ from ours. Its very religion is different from that pro fessed by the majority of the American people. Mexico is a Catholic country, and has so been since Christianity was first introduced there yet how many American Catholics acknowl edge a kinship with their elevem million brethren across the border? A great deal lies in understanding the people of any coun try, their customs and habits...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 135 that way?" an-earnest Mexican lady asked an American trav eler, temporarily staying in Mexico some months ago. "It is truly horrible! Have they no bulls in your country that the men can fight?" It may here be truthfully stated that even the bull-fight, comparatively harmless as it is, is on the wane in Mexico, as in all Spanish-speaking countries. No longer the haughty Mexican Don, attended by La Senora and La Signorita, sits enjoying the exciting spectacle; the chief patrons, in fact, al most the only patrons of the once-splendid pastime are the great lower classes, the peons, the mix'ed breeds, Indian, Spanish and Negro, who thus still find relaxation and amuse ment. Those of pure Spanish blood the aristocratic ele ment no longer attend, or, at best, appear so seldom that their attendance is exceptional. More people of the aristo cratic class attend a prize-fight in "the States" than witness a bull-fight in Mexico. Aside from this, our deathly game of t fo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

136 MEXICO AND THE MEXICANS. to. The Spanish, Indians, and mixed breeds, are all pecul iarly pious races. There is a constant flowing in and out, nor are the interiors without a fascinating attractiveness. Here are paintings old, rich and splendid, executed by native artists who have won distinction throughout the entire Spanish-speaking world. There are sculptures of a form and dig nity unsurpassed, except by a chosen few in Italy. And then the music that one hears pouring down from the time-stained organ-lofts! You do not listen to such across the border. The Mexicans are a musical people. Before the Spaniards came, the Aztec and Toltec races possessed great musical genius as is attested by the multitude of instruments exhumed from mounds and half-buried cities in Chiriqui and elsewhere. Even among the Aztecs of today there is a tradition that an ciently their monarchs were in the habit of beheading the un fortunate singer, or performer, guilty of a discord. The Mon tezumas did no...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 137 ish conquerors, the resemblances ends there. In the church all are associated together indiscriminately and certainly a great number of the sculptors, carvers, constructors of musi cal instruments, composers of music, painters of picturers, writers of books, are of Indian blood. And then the enjqy ment that is theirs! The Mexican fiesta appeals to all classes, and belongs to all. If it is the fiesta of a Saint, or a secular feast, like our season of Mardi-Gras, in either case it occu pies two or three eays in preparation, during which time all is merriment and anticipation. The yearly fiesta at Cordova occupies a whole week. In the City of Mexico, from first to last, twelve days. . And the grand day itself! It is simply in describable. In "the States" we can do nothing without fire works the thunder of cannon by day, the flash and flame of all kinds of illuminantsby night. In Mexico all is music and roses. It is the land of the sun, and the sunland is the la...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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