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Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857) Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 3,401 items from Boston Pilot (1838-1857), samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Foreign Summary. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 January 1847

Foreign Summary. A Cathodic Missionary—-Chinese Barbarity. The Gazette du Midi announces the arrival at Marseilles, from China, of Abbe Charricr, priest of the seminary of the foreign missions of Paris. “This ardent missionary,” it says, “has endured cruel sufferings for the cause of the Gospel. Arrested by the tyrants of i Tong King in 1841, M. Charrier was load- ! ed with chains, subjected to the frightful j torture of the cangue, and so unmercifully I flogged that he was left for dead on the | spot. His torturers vainly endeavored to j obtain from him revelations which would ; have compromised the neophytes; and he was actually under sentence of death, when the French corvette Heroine relieved him from a captivity that had already lasted seventeen mouths, and liberated with him four of his colleagues. M. Charrier has been recalled to Paris, to replace ono of the directors of the missions compelled by his advanced age to vacate his post.” Foreign Cattle. We understand that there h...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
DUBLIN CORPORATION. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 January 1847

DUBLIN CORPORATION. At the meeting of this body on the Ist of December, Mr. O’Connell made the following observations in relation to Repeal: Next, ‘my Lord mayor, I beg leave to give notice that on the second or third day of meeting in January I will move this corporation to petition for a Repeal of the Union (great cheering). I postpone it to that time, because I have hopes that in the interim all the other corporations of Ireland—at least nine-tenths of them—will discuss the question and agree jupon a petition (hear, hear). This corporation took the lead upon the subject on a former occasion, and we have a right to call upon the country corporations to commence now (hear, hear). it has been often said that we hold meetings for the Repeal at which we do not allow discussion. That opinion was contradicted most powerfully and most emphatically by the discussion in this corporation. Every gentleman of every opinion was allowed to speak to that question uninterruptedly. Those opposed t...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
REPEAL-SIR ROBERT PEEL. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 January 1847

REPEAL-SIR ROBERT PEEL. The hatred which the Protestants and the old Tory section of the once united and powerful Conservative party now bear towards Sir Robert Peel known no bounds.— His “treachery” will long be remembered by the unfortunate betrayed. His desertion ot his party and of his principles on the Emancipation question, the corn law question, and others, have already earned for him the everlasting execration of the men from whom he has separated. Rut there is a lower depth still. His past apostacies were bad enough, but there is another for which his cidivant admirers are, they tell us, fully prepared, and would not beat all surprised to witness. What new “jump”cari this be? Why nothing less than from being a decided anti-Repealer to be the advocate for Repeal—even to propose in parliament the Repeal of the Legislative Union! Such is the opinion formed of Sir Robert Peel by his old friends and fellowlabourers. A writer in Blackwood gives a portion of the speech with which ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE CONDITION OF IRELAND. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 January 1847

THE CONDITION OF IRELAND. From the Augsburg Gazette. Irish misery is increasing with every following hour; the very birds of the air are perishing for hunger; while man cries to God in heaven, and to his fellow-man on earth, for help in his hour of need. Heaven forfend that it come to a struggle between man and man—between the hungry and those who have to eat! Still,even this extreme seems almost at hand. Meanwhile, eveuts in Ireland, their influence upon England, and the attitude assumed by England to her more unfortunate sister are pregnant with lessons of the most instructive character. For centuries has Ireland been drained by England; for centuries have the sweat and blood of Ireland been wasted for England. At last, however, Ireland became aware of this state of things and demanded redress; she complained of absenteeism, and at last hit upon the simple idea that if she had a government and administration of her own in Dublin the system by w hich all herstrength and prosperity ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Correspondence. TO ALL WHOM IT MAY CONCERN. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 January 1847

Correspondence. TO ALL WHOM IT MAY CONCERN. 1 conceive, from a principle of Christian charity, from a true sense and just appreciation of the highly responsible and correlative duty which devolves oil the medical practitioner, that it becomes extremely necessary to animadvert on the pernicious and misguided custom of calling in two, three or more physicians to visit a patient at the same time, without their previous knowledge, and of disingeniously concealing from each the mode of treatment to which the patient was subjected by some or either of them. Such a fatal custom, so pregnant with evil consequences, should arrest the serious attention of those concerned, as it merits the virtuous denunciation of every well-wisher of the human family. The right of choosing a physician in whose wisdom and experience he can repose confidence, is the property of every rational individual, which should not be invaded by the prejudice or partiality of ignorant and designing men, who, leaving the r...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
TEMPERANCE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 January 1847

TEMPERANCE. Mr. Dona hoe —Dear Sir; Permit me i through the columns of your paper, to call the attention of the friends of temperance to a few facts in relation to those Sunday night meetings, held in Father Mathew j Hall, in Broad street. The public are already aware that the Father Mathew Society have continued those meetings since they were first organised; and to enable them to carry on more effectually the great work of reform, they rented-a large hall on the corner of India and Broad streets, and for the last two years Heaven seemed to smile on their efforts to secure the poor inebriate from misery and crime, and to make him again the sober, moral, and useful member of society. Hundreds of young men have rallied under the banner ot total abstinence; dwellings once desolate and dreary have become homes again, where peace and harmony and contentment reign. In going through Broad, and other streets where our people reside, its effect is evident—in no portion of our city is there ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
REPLY TO MR. MOONEY. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 January 1847

REPLY TO MR. MOONEY. To the Editor of the Bouton Pilot : Dear Sir, —I was not a little surprised at the unexpected and wanton attack which was made upon me in the Pilot of last week, by a certain Thomas Mooney, in consequence of a lecture, which I lately delivered before the “Young Catholics’ Friend Society.” As to the favorable reception of the lecture, I leave it to the society, and to the thousands who attended it, to decide; at the game time regretting, that the society should have permitted a tirade of abuse so undeserved, to appear in your journal. However, as it has been published without any ceremony, I think that a few remarks on the writer’s invectives and criticism, may serve to throw a j little light on the nature and importance | of his “very learned communication.” The first enquiry which presents itself to the reader, who has patience enough to wade through the rather lengthy satire is, w ho can this great man be w ho undertakes to “martyrize” Dr. Wilson, (in his own ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
The Muse. THOUGHTS FOR THE PRESENT. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 January 1847

The Muse. THOUGHTS FOR THE PRESENT. A BELFAST MAN. Remember the proud year Fokty-thhek, Ye men of steel-toned Era, Whose lull hearts heaved like a hill-hemm'd sea Round Mullnghtnast and Tara— Wiien tlie llery foa® of outgushing words, From Leaders stern and gifted, Broke over your ears like clash of swords By conquering bands uplifted, Men, these are the duys of doubt and guile, Of falsehood, fraud, and lolly— Then ask your hearts have ye yet an Isle Kor'wliieh to die were holy ? On ! yes, ye’ve the same green laughing laud, And the same hearts to adore her; But, men, there’s the same cold foreign hand Like a black bliglit hanging o’er her. And your hearts have leap’d in the living light Of the creed that proud year brought ye; And now in the teeth of ban and blight Will ye stand by the truths it taught ye? Can j c bear with the frowns of a wayward late, And your glorious work renew, men? Can ye smile at the false world’s craven hate? Oh, ye can, if you’re only true men. Ar. 1 a kol...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
ON HEARING OF THE ILLNESS OF TOM MOORE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 January 1847

ON HEARING OF THE ILLNESS OF TOM MOORE. N. O. Delta. Weep thee, sad Erin, thy bitterest tear. Let the Green Isle be wrapt as a funeral bier; Let the Heavens be darken’d that shadow the isle, Tor the light of thy Poet is gone for a while. As the sea that surrounds thee, in salt briny tears, Let the spray of thy grief touch the circle of years, Teach thy youth that the Ilarp of sweet Erin hath That the light of the Poet is gone in the East, [ceased; Vos, Ireland’s own bard, sweetest Poet of song, Like the Son of Bethlehem gone to thy home, rhy light, which is darkness to Erin and me, Is a star in the heavens for thee “Isle of the Sea.”

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Christianity and the Bayonet. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 January 1847

Christianity and the Bayonet. From the Niagara, (N.Y.) Courier. A correspondent of the N.Y. Tribune, takes occasion to reprove the Editor of that paper for his course in relation to the Mexican War, and rather approves of the measure, as he thinks it will eventually improve—Christianize, we believe he says —the Mexicans. He attributes the deplorable condition of that country, subject as it is to anarchy and misrule of every kind, to the prevailing religion of its inhabitants. To strengthen this position, towards the close of his article he remarks as follows: “ Why is not Catholic Ireland as thriving, intelligent and happy as Scotland.’ They have a better country and the same religious, priviliges. It is because of their ignorance, superstition and priestcraft. If Ireland were all Protestants to-day, the people in three years j would present as fair a spectacle of thrift and prosperity as the people of any other part of the Queen’s dominions.” As to his comparison of Ireland to Scot...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 January 1847
Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 January 1847

Frauds and Impositio Public. INTELLIGENCE 01 There is, unfortunately, every other populous city a horde of nefarious men ei eies of imposition and pett; der the pretence of finding the industrious poor, buy real estate, See. Hut who; is to gull the poor men ant of employment, out of th.’ii ed shillings and sixpences advertisements of the keepi INTELLIGENCE C that are daily paraded in t would—if you do not know —suppose they had no end for honest and industrious ; vant girls, clerks, &.C., 8 strange to state, their adve seldom varied, for instance YOl'Xfi MEN' WAXTEI uislied with iilhccs in nil kinds ness, such ns cirrus for stores, .inlet omnibus, private carriage, nmi expri partner wanted in the grocery hnsiiit it.il; one iii the broke.’s business. A up stairs, ifC. WANTED. A yonn: man in one in a dry goods store; one public house; one in a shoe store, the alley, &c. WAXTED. A partner in tli V ▼ first rate chance with a smal iMoker’s business; four agents wi...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 January 1847

a present of five or ten dollars more (?)” Victim. “Well, Squire, I huintgot but three dollars.” Diddler. “Ah,that’s bad, but haint you got a watch or coat you could leave with me or pawn and raise a few dollars?” Victim. “Yes, I’ve got a good silver watch 1 might leave with you until 1 get the situation, and when 1 get my wages I can redeem it again I suppose?” Diddler. “Just so, just so. Ah yes, this is a very good watch. Well, what’s your name?” Victim. “Josias Hard fist.” Diddler. “Hardfist? indeed, Ah! let me see, you are from ” Victim. “New Hampshire, Squire.” Diddler. “Just so, I am well acquainted with several of the Hard fists, you are the son of old, old —Hardfist of—of—” Victim. “Of Concord.” Diddler. “Just so, I know your father (?) very well, oh, yes, know him very well.” Victim. “Well, Squire, suppose you give me the direction to the man that wants to hire one and I’ll go right off.” Diddler. Just so, well, there is the number and address of Mr. Duftail.” Victim. “Than...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 3 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 January 1847

tffrjSfiSS, MECHANIC. tal siß(;mi C OST t until Morel No. iitJO Washing Avon Place, Boston. For the purpo* extensively m many impoitaut res mode of preparing ami mounting Mi the merits ol which, it isconflilently L to greatly exceed the usuul method o subscriber has been induced to offer ited time, as will not only give to th opportunity of testing the practice but will offer a rare opportunity ft whoso means are too limited to pa mntided. The new principle is nc small ease* of two or more teeth, bu prcial/y adapted to whole and lialfset or dental has become uueven u absorbing ol some parts mure titan cases, it will be readily seen by an exi that carved work in blocks, prepun case, is necessary, for restoring that moved by absorption, and lor bringin lips to their natural and uniform fulln to be overcome in whole and half set per form is concerned, are thus fully n it is not possible to accomplish it so j means. It is the want of ihi* ingenii work, to remedy the delects abovt many a...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 4 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 January 1847

X» REMITTANCES TO IRKLA\T) jf & ANP PASSAGES, BY "TAPSCOTTS 1 LINE, ny i six to BOSTON on NEW YORK. DRAFTS for one pound and upwards, payable in any part of Ireland, England or Scotland, and PASSAGES by the above Splendid Line may be obtained by persons here for their friends at home, on apply itig to ELLIOTT A GREIG, No. l() Merchants Exchange, Boston, Agents for W. A J. T. TAPSCOTT. FebTistf rfIHOMAS D. GLEASON, 85 BROAD St. A* Wholesale Dealer in Strong Beer,Porter, Ale and eider A large supply kept constantly on hand tor cityaud conntry sale, which will be sold on the most reasonaby terms. Jnt 1? DWA R D DOLAN, MRELHASiT A TAILOR , (Late oj Boston), 14i Westminster street, Providence, R.l, respectfully solicits the patronage of hi* friends and the public. He hopes to render good satisfaction to those who please favor him with a call He will keep a good assortment of Cloths, Cassimeres, Doeskins, Vestings, Ac. Also, Ready Made Garments from his own establishment by th...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 5 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 January 1847

Notices of this kind inserted four times for $i INFORMATION WASTED. Of PATRICK MORAN, tvho emigrated to this coun-. try in April, ls4ti, Irom Barney Forth, Welsh town, Ceunty VV exford. When lust heard from he \\ as at the house of Mr. James Crosier, at the Marsh, St. John, N. B„ and from there it is believed he has come to the United States. lie is now about 20 years old. Should this meet his eye, 9r any person acquainted with him, they would coaler a favor by wi iting to his father, Richard Moran, East Cambridge, Ms. j»-4tlf Of HENRY CONDEL, a native of Graney, parish of Boultinglass, co. Kildare. When last heard from (which is about 8 years ago), he was in Taunton, Ms. Any information respecting him will lie thankfully received by his brother, Thomas Coudel, who arrived here from Ireland last June—addressed to him, care of Mr. Thomas Shorten, No. 284 Salem street, Boston, Ms. jit—4t If ot MAURICE DANEEN, or his wife, Bridget Barry, a native ofco. Cork, pnrisii of Castlelyons, who...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Ireland. THE SECESSION—THE ROTUNDO MEETING. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 January 1847

Ireland. THE SECESSION—THE ROTUNDO MEETING. (Concluded flom our last.) Mr. Thomas F. Meagher next presented himself, and was received for several minutes with loud and enthusiastic cheers. He said—Sir, it is a righteous duty to instruct the slave, but it is a proud privilege to address the freeman (cheers). That privilege 1 now enjoy. I avail myself of it to vindicate my character, that 1 may hereafter be of service to my country. With that view, my friends, have I come here this night, and I trust not in vain. Here, in this splendid hall, on the first anniversary of the Richmond imprisonment, did we assemble, clad in the uniform of the Irish nation; and here,before the civic representatives of our chief cities and the patriot members of the legislature did we vow, that we would never desist from seeking a Repeal of the Legislative Union, by all peaceable, moral, and constitutional means, until a parliament was restored to Ireland (cheers). That is the vow of the llotundo. I‘ublic m...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE TABLET ON THE CONTROVERSY. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 January 1847

THE TABLET ON THE CONTROVERSY. THE PILOT. SATURDAY. JAXUARV 9. 1847. The London Tablet, after some hesitation, has entered on the discussion of the vexed question which now agitates Repealers. Its position is, to support O’Connell ih his practical course, but to oppose him in the abstract view of the subject. There are a great man) fallacies which lie like an incubus, just now, on the minds of many Repealers—they feel them; but they cannot express them. Some of these, the Tablet puts into words, with a great deal of plausibility. His article may bring out a quantity of argument, on this side the Atlantic, which is now lying in the shape of impressions on the minds of the doubting and dissatisfied. For fear of that, and for fear that weak minds might be induced to doubt the soundness of the moral force doctrine, we propose to give the gist of his observations, and examine their correctness. We believe, nothing yet has appeared, in the shape of argument, against that doctrine, which w...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
REV. MR. O’REILLY’S LECTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 January 1847

REV. MR. O’REILLY’S LECTURE. Some people have taken the liberty to think that our reference to Rev. James O’Reilly’s lecture, last week, was ironical. They had no right to think any such thing. We obtained our knowledge of the lecture from the report in our own paper; and if we laid it befofe the public as worthy of i credit, of course, we were bound to believe it ourselves. We received it as trustworthy, vve maintain it to be so, and will maintain it till it be proved otherwise. We have heard no person yet venturing to say that the lecture was not magnificent and sublime, as the report very properly represented it to be; and we think it surprising that we should be suspected of insincerity in echoing the eulogiums of our own reporter. However, as we are on that matter, there is one thing in the report alluded to, which we thiuk injudicious. It is the general comparison instituted between different lecturers, in respect of talent. The gentlemen who address the Young Catholics’ Frien...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
REV. MR. GIBSON’S LECTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 January 1847

REV. MR. GIBSON’S LECTURE. The lecture to the Young Catholics’ Friends, delivered by Rev Mr. Gibson, of Worcester, was highly interesting, and listened to with unwavering attention. It presented a mass of facts respecting the Catacombs of Rome. It unveiled almost j anew world to its hearers, who, we suspect, were hardly prepared for so much curious and striking information. We give as much of it as our limits will admit: “During the times of persecution, the faithful were obliged to conceal themselves in the subterranean caverns of the earth, whence the Pagan Romans excavated the sand, used in the construction of the city, and which had been abandoned on account of their vast extent, depth, and difficult access. These subterraneans we may divide into three parts. The most noble and most secret were devoted to the celebration of the divine mysteries, another part served as a temporary asylum for the Christians, and places of concealment from thoir enemies, and the third part they res...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
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