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Elephind.com contains 116,947 items from Recorder, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Untitled [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 10 June 1921

" TRIMBLE, Va., June 7. —Eld. C. B. Gibbs preached at Wesley Chapel Sunday at 11 o’clock. Mrs. C. A. Dickson is numbered with the sick. Miss Violet Gutshall, of Back Creek was visiting relatives here last week. The Misses Rader, of W. Va., are spending sometime with their mother in the home of Lonnie Doyle. Miss Sylvia Gutshall was the guest Saturday night of her uncle W, T, Gutshall. Eld and Mrs. C. B. Gibbs, Misses Carrie and Elva Hamilton and Boyd Bussard were Sunday guests of Harvy Waggy. John Bussard, of Big Valley, spent Saturday night and Sunday with his sister. Mrs. Orvie Gutshall. Eld Jas. W. Gardner preached at Vistory Chapel Sunday night. Several of the folks from here attended J H. Pruitt’s sale in Monterey Thursday, Forest Hiner and John Hamilton Miss Lizzie Terry, Edna Terry Hinkel Terry and Gertie Grifiln, of the M. H. S., have come home. Mr. and Mrs. Clay Waggy and two sons Clement and Paul were guests Sunday of the latter’s brother, Orvie Gutshall. A. J. Terry, J. A...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
MICKIE SAYS— [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 10 June 1921

MICKIE SAYS—

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
A ftear-Siiastef [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 10 June 1921

A ftear-Siiastef A eeufelmhtt homing no h’olii Me Dowell last Sunday was heard to observe that “it was always the unexpected things that happen; for instance if I had been told that McDowell had been visited by a cyclone I would have felt sure that at least ouedwelling house had withstood the elements, yet, last night with no wind or storm at all, one wall of that very house tumbled down”. He then explained that the noardisaster occured about 10:30, the dwelling%>eing the large brick building known as the Peterson property now owned by A. R. Hincr It was while Mr. Hiner was holding family worship that the rumbling sound was heard and with but a moments warning the foundation of the large chimney on the west side of the house crumbled, the chimney and several feoet of wall falling in and crashing through two floors to the basement. Fortunately none of the family was in the immediate danger line, al though a daughter, sick in Ltd on the upper floor, barely escaped the mass ...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
McKENDREE [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 10 June 1921

McKENDREE McKENDREE, June 7.—Mrs. Mary Siron, wife of Abel Siron, departed this life May 31, 1921 at the age of eighty years. Having been in declining health for some time her death was not unexpected. She was converted and united with the Methodist Church, South, about forty years ago, and by her death the church has lost a most devoted and faithful member. Appropriate funeral services were conducted from the Methodist church Wednesday afternoon by her pastor Rev. S. R. Snead assisted by Rev. L. M. Moffet of the Presbyterian church, after which the remains were interred in the Siron cemetery. She leaves to mourn their loss beside an aged husband five children, they are Mrs. Jno. Simmons, Headwaters, Mrs. Jno. Samples, Strait Creek, Luther, of Colfax, Ill., Lyman of this community, and Olin at home. We extend our sympathy to the bereaved family. Uriah Halterman, of Swoope, Va., after a few days visit among friends, returned to his home last Saturday. Henry H. Siron and wife recently...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
MONTEREY 15-FRANKLIN 6 [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 10 June 1921

MONTEREY 15-FRANKLIN 6 The Monterey Base Ball team defeated Franklin here, on Saturday, 15 to 6. Franklin was crippled by the loss of two players, but the game was fast regardless of the large score. M The home team made a good showing for the first game and hit I/ukius hard, while Franklin was unable to find Eagle. The box score is given below. FRANKLIN Ab. R. H. O. A. E. Hedrick c 5 112 6 2 Carter If 5 0 1 0 0 2 Waggoner ss 4 2 1 3 2 2 Lukens p 410511 Penabaker 3b 400210 Bowman cf 4 0 10 10 Boggs lb 3 0 1 3 10 1 McLaughlin 2b 4 1 0 1 2 2 Keister rf 4 0 13 10 Total 37 5 6 19 24 10 MONTEREY Ab. R. H. O. A. E. Payne c 3 2 3 0 11 1 Slaven 2b 5 113 2 0 Mackey H lb 4 2 2 f 11 0 Trimble ss 4 2 3 3 2 2 Eagle p 4 1 2 12 10 1. Wiley 3b 4 1 2 2 0 0 Stephenson pf 4 2 1 0 0 1 Campbell If 4 2 1 0 0 1 Mackey rf 2 10 111 Total 32 13 15 23 27 7 Theree base hits —H. Macky, Trim ble. Two base hits —Slaven, Payne, Lukens. Waggoner. Sacrifice hits— Slaven , H. Mackey 2 Campbell 2, Payne- 1. Time — one...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
BIG BALL GAME! [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 10 June 1921

BIG BALL GAME! Between Two Strong Teams MARLINTON GIANTS VS MONTEREY On Saturday, June 11th Every one should see the game which promises to be the best of the season. Batteries —Monterey; Trimble gnd Eagle Marlinton: Yeager and McNeil. Umpire: Maj. C. S. Roller. LAWN PARTY-BENEFIT OF TEAM A lawn parly will be held on the court lawn commencing at 5 o’clock Saturday evening, by the young ladies who will have charge and be delighted to have you come and help the boys. There will be lots of good things to eat.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Eight Pmetit [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 10 June 1921

Eight Pmetit In response to the invitation issued by the Highland Chapter, IT. D. C., eight from the decimated ranks of Confederate veterans responded today—Thursday—and w r ere guests of honor at a dinner served by the Chap ter at Hotel Cunningham. The eight present were J. Clark Wilson, native Highlander but now of Elkhart, Ind., M. H. Corbett, John W. Simmons, G. W. Botkin, J. C. Pruitt, F. C. Trimble A. C. Bird and J. H. Samples. The Confederate monument on the court lawn was appropriately decorated with confederate flags and wreathes of wild flowers. o Lloyd Sullenberger returned first of the week from a trip to Baltimore o Lawn party and Baseball at Monterey Saturday evening.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 10 June 1921
Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 10 June 1921

LUC SIR CIGARETTE A new size package I Ten for 10c. Very convenient. Dealers carry both; lOforlOc; 20for20c. It’s toasted. c OuyanlMd Jy CHURCH SERVICES MONTEREY CIRCUIT First Sunday—Seybert Chapel 11 a. m.; Higtown, 3. p.; Monterey 8 p. m. Second Sunday—Monterey, 11 a. m.; Green Hill, 3 p. m. Third Sunday—Higtown, 11 a. m.; Trinity, 3 p. in.; Monterey 8 p. m. Fourth Sunday—Rehoboth, 11 a. m. Monterey, 8 p. m. Rembert D. McNeer Crabbottom Charge—lst Sunday Cent ral 11 A. M.; New Church, 3 P. M. 2nd Sunday, Union Chapel 11 A. M.; Central 8 P. M. 3rd Sunday New Church 11 A. M.; Central 8 P. M. 4th Sunday Circleville 11 A. M.; Dry Run 3 P. M. Ist quarterly meeting at Central, preaching by P. E. Rev. J.H.Light May Ist 8 P. M. Busines meeting May 2 10 A. M. H. W. Lindimood For Sale Privately I will sell privately my house and lot in Monterey Va. The house contains 8 rooms of modern convenienc es, electric lights, and water piped in house, out buildings are a good meat house, wood house b...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 10 June 1921

I o 0 Qo o o O i <? % :§ Every year we pay out in Highland thousands of dollars £: It is the interest at four per cent on the savings of our friends. li£* monies back to them, the reward ofiirifty practice and intelligeenc real* soning. To have you must save. ;£ g: Start today!! :g THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK Monterey Va s TIRES TIRE MIItACE ATLOWEST COST IN HISTORY 30x3 Plain 30x3 1-2 non-skid 30x3 tubes 30x3 1-2 tubes 12.00 15.00 2.15 2.55 Fisk Tires are adjusted on 0000 miles basis. ftl 111 if and Honest Product w ■Zf'J For Sale Privately An excellant farm of 25 0 acres, three miles north of McDowell, Vi.!T J or So acres ir good sod, 15 acres !in fuming land & ul rema.ndi r in excellent range land; well timbered and , watered. On this farm is a good 8 room house practically new, with fine water right at door and all necessry out buildings consisting of cement cellar, garage & corn crib combined, barn &c. A nice orchard containing an abun...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
nr rirPTrrt ~ ■ – FASTEST SPtEO AMO PHOTO EVER MADE ! [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 10 June 1921

nr rirPTrrt ~ ■ - FASTEST SPtEO AMO PHOTO EVER MADE ! On? hundred and twelve miles an hour is the that man has. ever traveled, shown here, as Fred Ludlow set the record at the Beverly, ’Hills track in Los Angeles. More remarkable vet is the camera which 'so accurately photographs such speed. Loth teat and photo are h story ,ry 1-in ».**

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
GO FAR BACK IN HISTORY Prehistoric Animals and Reptiles That Have Survived the Long March of Father Time. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 10 June 1921

GO FAR BACK IN HISTORY Prehistoric Animals and Reptiles That Have Survived the Long March of Father Time. Many of the prehistoric beasts and reptiles are still with us, though we do not always recognize them. Our common hedgehog was one of them, says a writer in Loudon Answers. lie lived and nourished in these islands thousands of years ago, as the rocks tell us in their unerring way. lie owes his survival to his prickles, his comfortable disposition and careful habits; and, seeing he is a useful little beast, nobody is sorry that he outlived the dragons of old. The common shrew is literally “as old as '.he hills.” His remains have been found as deep as men have ever dug, and that means a very ancient history Indeed. The shrew is the smallest animal on the globe, and, despite his size, he is the champion “flyweight” of the fields. He also has a frightful temper, especially when “he” is a “she,” Hence the term “shrew.’ Turtles and tortoises are old-timers, too. The huge Galapagos tor...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
FUG MADE MANY JOURNEYS Emblem Finally Planted by Peary at the North Pols Had Undergone Seine Vicissitudes. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 10 June 1921

FUG MADE MANY JOURNEYS Emblem Finally Planted by Peary at the North Pols Had Undergone Seine Vicissitudes. The flag which Peary planted at the North polo, and which has drifted 400 miles from its original geographical position, has done more traveling in high altitudes than any other ever made. The intrepid explorer carried io, W omui.-i oJumt his-body on every one of his expeditions northwards, and left a fragment of it at each of his successive “farthest norths.” By the time it actually reached the pole, therefore, It was somewhat worn and discolored. A broad diagonal section of this silk ensign was left at the farthest goal of earth, and a diagonal strip of the same flag was deposited in a glass bottle by Peary, tdgeflier with his records and a message, and was placed in a space between the ice blocks of a pressure ridge. Four other flags were left at the pole; the colors of the Delta Kappa fraternity, the World’s Ensign of Liberty and Peace (red, white and blue, in a held of whi...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
The Seismograph. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 10 June 1921

The Seismograph. There is a little instrument —or perhaps it’s a big one; at any rate, It is little In comparison with its job —that lias a field all its own and that knows not sentiment. Its scientific name is the “seismograph.” When a gigantic c.tfaclysm in the earth’s crust overwhelms some city and sends thousands homeless into the fields, it records the fact with mercilessly cold methodicity. At such times it is absolutely inhuman in its devotion to the bald scientific. It worries about the cause of disaster; bothers itself not a whit about effect. Then, having exhibited its callousness, it goes to sleep, perhaps has a conscience-smit-ten dream and suddenly wakes up to prove to us all, or some of us, that we have wholly unsuspected cause for thankfulness. In this mood It’s about the only thing on earth able and willing to Impart that impossible piece of knowledge—what we missed.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Heard at a Reception. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 10 June 1921

Heard at a Reception. “What was Ann talking so earnestly to you about?”“Oh, art, culture and that sort of thing. I’m afraid 1 dropped off once or twice.” “Had a sort of Ann-esthetic effect, ch?”—Boston Transcript.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
SSlat PROGltvi Of SCIENCE When It Is Solved It May Be Believed the God of War Will Be Dethroned, [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 10 June 1921

SSlat PROGltvi Of SCIENCE When It Is Solved It May Be Believed the God of War Will Be Dethroned, At present we know of but three posssible sources of new energy—solar energy, the internal heat of the earth, and atomic disintegration, writes Floyd W. Parsons In the World’s Work. The last-mentioned source of energy Is just now attracting greatest attention. We know that the atoms of radium are in constant process of breaking up. We know that this disintegration liberates energy, for It has proved that the temperature of the air surrounding a piece of radium Is about three degrees higher than the temperature beyond been unable to Increase the flow of energy from radium by heating the metal to a temperature as high as that of the electric arc. Nor have in vestlgators been able to slow down the disintegration of radium atoms by placing the metal in a temperature as low as that of liquid air. In other words, we are easily able to observe all of the phenomena of radio-activity and yet we c...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
FIGURES IN CITY’S HISTORY Blackwell’s Island, in the East River, New York, Once Attractive Part of the Metropolis. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 10 June 1921

FIGURES IN CITY’S HISTORY Blackwell’s Island, in the East River, New York, Once Attractive Part of the Metropolis. The name of Blackwell’s Island, In East river, New York city, famous for its prison am] workhouse, may become Welfare island. The island came Into possession of the Blackwell family about 16G6 through marriage, then being called Manning’s island, owned by Mary Manning, said to be a niece of Lord Cornbury, governor of the province of New York. Albert Blackwell, the first proprietor of that name —It was he who married Mary Manning—was a member of the provincial assembly 1092-95. During the French and Indian war his grandson, Jacob, served as colonel, and during the Revolution he was a stanch patriot. His property was confiscated and held during the long occupation of New York by the British. Soldiers were encamped on his Long Island lands opposite the island and officers were quartered at his residence. His death was hastened, it is said, by his financial losses.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
“Frankenstein," [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 10 June 1921

“Frankenstein," “Frankenstein” Is a romance by Mrs. Shelley, wife of the distinguished poet, Percy Byssche Shelley. The hero, Frankenstein, contrives to make and animate by his intimate control of the mysteries of nature, a mouster In human form, who becomes the constant torment of its creator’s existence. The monster was created without a soul, yet not without an intense craving for human sympathy, and he found existence on these terms such a terrible curse that in the end he slew his maker. The story of “Frankenstein” is said to be consciously or unconsciously an allegorical portrayal of the character of Shelley himself, who, In “Alastor,” has painted himself as an Idealist Isolated from human sympathy. Helen Moore, in her life of Shelley, has a chapter on this subject.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Make Firelighters of Clay. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 10 June 1921

Make Firelighters of Clay. The manufacture of a firelighter from clay deposits found on his land is being undertaken by a farmer in Saskatchewan. This deposit is the only known one of its kind on the American continent, although considerable quantities of this clay are also found in Germany. The firelighter is in the form of a brick. It is soaked in kerosene for a few minutes, and when It has absorbed a quantity a match is applied. The brick will burn for a half hour with a steady flame, and when exhausted can be replenished with kerosene and used indefinitely. Other uses to which this clay can be put are: Kalsomine, filler for paper, cleansing powders, white shoe polish, and brick or tile of the very best quality. —Scientific American.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Sunday as Day of Rest. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 10 June 1921

Sunday as Day of Rest. Sunday ought to be a day for tuning up the health of the soul, mind and body together. It does not at present fulfill this function because It Is treated simply as a day of idleness. Rest is not Idleness; the best definition of It Is unimpeded activity. The oldfashioned idea that everything ought to be changed on Sunday—clothes, books, children’s games—had some wisdom In it. The habits of the working days were to be broken; we were to do just those things which were not done during the week. So Sunday was a day apart, a real day of refreshment; It did not make us feel “Mondayish”— I. e., good for nothing when it was over.—Dean Inge.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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