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Elephind.com contains 2,614 items from Monocle, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Monocle — 12 November 1954

November 12, 1954 Jayem Takes Loss; Team To Be Ready For Jeffersonians Title Hopes Dashed As 'Devils Win John Marshall's State Title hopes were dealt a stunning blow as they were by George Washington High of Alexandria, 21-7 at City Stadium last Saturday night, for Jayem's first defeat. Against an overload line, the Jayem ground attack sputtered except for their one scoring drive, late in the fourth period. The first time the Presidents had possession, they scored as fullback John Bernard took a pitchout and raced 69 yards. Alexandria threatened again in the third quarter, but the Jayem defense put up a gallant goal-line stand that stopped the Presidents on the one-yard line. In the fourth period, quarterback Harry Lee Goode personally engineered the lone Jayem score on a series of option plays and went over from the two on a sneak. John Marshall showed a definite weakness in pass defense as George Washington quarterback Mike Agee missed only one of his many pass attempts. After Jay...

Publication Title: Monocle, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Monocle — 12 November 1954

Page Four ■r B % a ft** JBBBWMk. m | < '* rain^l ggllJ - ■ - r TYMPANOISE —Sandra Kennedy booms on the tympani while Peggy Yarbrough seems to be having a much better time clanging the cymbals together. A Woman's World Sound Effects of Orchestra Strictly for 'Cra Boys usually do it. Many adults wish they could do it. But two hep girls, Sandra Kennedy and Peggy Yarbrough, play the percussion instruments in the J. M. orchestra. The girls try their hands at everything from cymbals to chimes. As a rule Sandra takes care of the tympani and triangle parts, while Peggy gives out the beat on the drums. A peep at the orchestra during sixth period might show Sandra pecking away at a typewriter and Peggy busy making like a carriage return and bell. These extraordinary feats are required for Maxwell Anderson's novelty number, The Typewriter. Another piece, The Waltzing Cat, calls for several cat's meows and one dog's bark. So far the girls haven't found a satisfactory way to produce a...

Publication Title: Monocle, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Monocle — 2 December 1954

TELL 'EM YOU SAW IT IN THE MONOCLE XXVI No. 5 Owen Boss Of Paper This Issue Journalism Class Edits School News Three weeks ago, in a little less turmoil and excitement than Hurricane Hazel, the journalism class elected an editor and all the other necessary officers and prepared to get down to the job of taking over the editing of The Monocle for this issue. Each year the staff of The Monocle releases the editing of the newspaper into the hands of the journalism class, since they are the future staff members. Eileen Owen was elected to head this issue as editor-in-chief, with John Church as managing editor. News editor is Walter Clark, and Jane Payne is the feature editor. The class elected Bobby Luck as sports editor. After that, the class elected Jean Ormand as fashion writer. The guest writer for The Nook is Frances Grimm, the Spectroscope, David Richart, and the arts column, Peggy Yarbrough. UNANIMOUS CHOICE Since there is only one cadet in the class, Sander Margolis was unanimou...

Publication Title: Monocle, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Monocle — 2 December 1954

Page Two A Practice to Shun Students and faculty of John Marshall have always been proud of the democratic principles employed by our school. However, we now note with dismay that there are students here that have departed from our ideal of democracy. The idea of high school sororities and fraternities seem to be spreading in the Richmond area. When they first started springing up at John Marshall, the administration tried to nip them in the bud. Since then a bulletin regarding the faculty's policy on the subject has been issued to be read in homerooms all over the school. It appears to have been in vain. The administration's policy, stated in one of the bulletins, is this: "This administration and the faculty oppose these societies at John Marshall." In 1919 the Illinois Legislature defined a high school secret society as, "any organization, composed ... of public school students, which seeks to perpetuate itself by taking additional members from the students enrolled in such schoo...

Publication Title: Monocle, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Monocle — 2 December 1954

December 2, 1954 Justices Edged Out by Presidents, 14-13, in Final Game Conversion Spelled Difference Approximately 9,200 spectators watched an unpredictable and wild game at the city stadium as Teejay took an early lead and hung on to eke out a 14-13 victory. Teejay scored first with 2:05 left in the first quarter from the five yard line after halfback Ed Dovel interrupted a Jayem pass on the 25 and ran it to the five. Teejay's second score came in the third quarter as John Marshall recovered a blocked kick on Jayem's 18 yard line. Three plays later Teejay scored for a 14 to 0 lead. Jayem exploded in the fourth quarter by scoring two touchdowns within 80 seconds, the first coming on Cecil Umberger's 85 yard sprint when he recovered a Tee jay fumble in the air on the Justices' 15 yard stripe. The second touchdown was set up when Henry Bryant recovered a fumble about a minute later on Teejay's 18 yard line. Two plays later Don Goodman swept his right end to score the second TD from 1...

Publication Title: Monocle, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Monocle — 2 December 1954

Page Four Students Set For Orations Contest In U.S. Pupils Study Hard For Scholarships With visions of a $4,000 scholarship, many students all over the U.S. are now beginning to prepare for the 18th annual National High School Oratorical Contest. Last year, 325,000 students in the 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th grades of public and private schools participated. To enter the contest, sponsored by the American Legion, a student prepares a 10- to 12-minute oration on some phase of the Constitution, emphasizing the duties and obligations of a citizen to the government. A thorough study of the Constitution of the United States is necessary to prepare the oration. Certain sections of Articles of the Constitution have to be memorized for an extemporary discusion at the end of the prepared oration. HARDWORK—PEPLE "It's hard work, but anyone who has ever studied for it says that he has never regretted it. What you learn is worth the effort," explained Miss Mary Peple. "I will give anyone informat...

Publication Title: Monocle, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Monocle — 16 December 1954

TELL 'EM YOU SAW IT IN THE MONOCLE XXVI No. 6 '55 Senior Who's Who Amidst the Christmas confusion and rush, does anyone know "who's who"? It's a cinch you know if you're a senior Marshallite. The superlatives in the fields of clothes, looks, personalities, brains, and activities were announced by the John Marshall Senior Class on Wednesday, December 8. Leading the parade for the most popular of the February class of '55 are Pat Tucker and Jimmy Holmes. To Dolly Reynolds and Tommy Jones goes the best all-round title. Because of their talents in the respective fields of journalism and music, Gaynelle Hitchens and David Bishop are dubbed the most talented. When it comes to brains, Phyllis Worrell and Earl Norman have little competition for the most intelligent, and Betsy Ross and Dickie Arnold are a sure bet for the most likely to succeed. The best looking couple in school, acording to the votes, are Nancy Myers and Richard Barrett. Elaine O'Neill and Bill Coleman always look like fash...

Publication Title: Monocle, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Monocle — 16 December 1954

Page Two There Was No R00m... "And she brought forth her first born son and lay him in a manger, for there was no room for them in the inn." At this Christmas season we often hear these words. We have heard them since we were little tots. Our parents would tell us the story of the Christ child, as we listened in wide-eyed wonder. They are old words written centuries ago, but in a way, they can be applied to our modern age. Amid the bustle of Christmas, we seldom find room in our hearts for Christ-like things—the real source of Christmas. We are greatly concerned about a present for Aunt Susie, or whether to send a card to a friend. Our minds are filled with thoughts of Christmas decorations and what Santa Claus will put under the tree for us. Underneath all this tinsel, ribbon, bustle, and excitement, how often do we think of the real meaning of Christmas? We don't bother to buy a present, or even send a thought to Jesus. We are celebrating His birthday, but He is the furtherest thi...

Publication Title: Monocle, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Monocle — 16 December 1954

December 16, 1954 Maury First Group 1 Foe For the Justices Tommorrow Non-District Tilt Marks Jayem Opener The John Marshall Justices open their Group I basketball campaign tomorrow by traveling to Norfolk to meet the highly-touted Maury Commodores. Last year's state champion, Jayem expects to field a strong team with 9 returning lettermen. Back from last year are co-captains Harry Lee Goode and Don Goode, Tommy Jones, Lee Southard, Jimmy Adams, Earl Norman, Ed Beck, Amos Tinnell and Junie Wyatt. These experienced players hope to take up the slack left by the graduation of Larry Rauppius, Buck Jones, Tommy Davies, and Tommy Murray. A host of height and talent from the junior varsity is expected to fill the gap. 17 WINS LAST YEAR The team last year climaxed a brilliant season of 17 wins and 3 losses with three victories in the state tournament at Arlington and a return of the state championship to John Marshall after an absence of 6 years. Rated to be little more than a District power...

Publication Title: Monocle, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Monocle — 16 December 1954

Page Four In Eight Years—Nobody Tuesday Big Day for Home Says Daily Bulle "Better late than never." So goes the saying, although more students are absent than tardy every day. This information and more is recorded every day on the daily bulletin which is the most widely read paper in John Marshall. It is also one of the most important papers, for it contains notes to the students as well as the faculty, and it lists the students absent ,leaving, tardy, withdrawing, or new. An average 01 oU pupils is absent each day, which is just under 5 per cent of all Jayem. Tuesday is the day most disliked by the students. On this day, more are absent, late, and leaving, with Monday running it a close second. Absences on Monday can be understood. That desired longer weekend or recuperation from one could be the excuse, but Tuesday presents a problem. Since Monday is the first day back, Tuesday could be the recuperation from Monday. Thursday is a good, all-round day. More people come, fewer are la...

Publication Title: Monocle, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Monocle — 20 January 1955

TELL 'EM YOU SAW IT IN THE MONOCLE XXVI No. 7 Commencement Set for Monday Night, January 31 E. E. Owen Will Edit Newspaper . New Staff Named For Ensuing Term The journalism class has chosen Eileen Owen to be editor-in-chief of The Monocle for next term, according to Mr. Mooney, adviser. Eileen is president of the Girls' Athletic Association and is an active member in the Future Business Leaders of America. Since entering John Marshall, she has participated in many school activities. While at Bainbridge Junior High School, she was on the newspaper staff and has been an active member in the journalism class this year. OTHERS CHOSEN Other members of the new staff have also been chosen. The editor will be assisted in writing editorials by Earle Brown, Eileen Cordle, and Shirley Green. The new managing editor will be John Church. Keeping up with all the news stories will be Walter Clark, news editor, and Leo Crosier, Scott Wagner, Lydia Brindle, Janet Brown, and Shirley Howard, news writ...

Publication Title: Monocle, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Monocle — 20 January 1955

Page Two Who, Me ? A group of sleepy-eyed, solemn-faced, students walk into the room. We scramble to our seats for last minute peeks into our books. There is a mad rush for the pencil sharpener and a frantic search for paper, erasers, and fountain pens. When all is in readiness, the teacher puts the questions on the board. Wide-eyed, we read the first question. Our minds go completely blank. We gaze into space, doodle on a piece of scratch paper, and try our best to think. Anxiously we follow the questions as she puts them up, but they look like Greek to us. Suddenly we recognize something familiar, and so we begin the exam. As we tackle each new problem, we think back to the night before and try to remember what we studied. All we can remember is that Eddie Fisher was singing "I Need You Now" on the radio, and that peanut butter sandwich was awfully good, but it certainly did mess up that magazine that was tucked inside the textbook. We remember being hard at work (?) studying when...

Publication Title: Monocle, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Monocle — 20 January 1955

January 20, 1955 JM Downed by Cadets, Ready for TJ Tomorrow Night Football Team Attends Feast; Prizes Awarded The football banquet for the members of the team and cheerleaders was held December 20 at the Central YMCA. The banquet was sponsored by the fathers of the players, and, excluding the cheerleaders, was a father-son affair. ' Mr. Eugene Luck, father of the fullback, Bobby Luck, was the toastmaster for the evening of fun. Upon entering the banquet room, everyone was given a bag containing 10 beans, and every time anyone could get another person to answer "yes" or "no" to him, he collected one of their beans. Don Goode, after consolidating, won the prize with a grand total of 51 beans. This was not the only prize awarded, for a hat-making contest was also staged, and a prize was given to the person making the best hat with 1 newspaper and 2 straight pins. Dr. Dixon made a striking appearance with his cylinder-shaped chapeau and Coach Clayton Rechenbach's George Washington-Napol...

Publication Title: Monocle, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Monocle — 20 January 1955

Page Four Hp y&y .Vy-WB ;lw <; > ■ - - >xw. f —Monofoto MO' SNOW—Through rain, sleet, and snow come the John Marshall teachers as is displayed here by Mr. Walter Beverly, adviser of The Record. He is just ending his long walk from Church Hill. The snow, which came unexpectedly, made John Marshall look JM Receives Face-lifting As Painters Brig John Marshall's time-honored halls have been pervaded recently by the smell of paint and turpentine. Yes, the school is finally being repainted. It will be the first time in almost eight years that the entire Marshall Building has had a new coat of paint, and the bright, new colors are welcomed by students and faculty alike. The painters completed work on the cafeteria over the Christmas holidays and then began working down from the third Boor. No one has any idea exactly how long the job will take. Assistant Principal Oscar H. Parrish has reported that the painting is being handled through the offic...

Publication Title: Monocle, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Monocle — 17 February 1955

TELL 'EM YOU SAW IT IN THE MONOCLE XXVI No. 8 Jay em Welcomes New Students As February Classes Begin Anew Frosh Tune Changes As Term Goes By Frances Grimm Reading, 'riting, and 'rithmertic are the familiar three R's offered to John Marshall students, plus athletics, student activities and the Corps of Cadets. Is it any wonder that there is a large class of newcomers to JM? New students to the school were introduced to student leaders, the faculty, and the building itself at the orientation ceremonies January 28. Purposes of orientation for new pupils are numerous. To many newcomers the building and older students seem foreboding and unfriendly. Coming to a school with two buildings and the famed tunnel, which everyone has heard so much about, is right much to take in on one occasion. Realizing this, the Jayem faculty, in cooperation with the student association, planned a program to suit the needs of almost every pupil. STUDENTS ORIENTATED Ann Woodson, a member of the orientation co...

Publication Title: Monocle, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Monocle — 17 February 1955

Page Two Sling, Slang, Slung It's really amazing how many good ol' English words have been changed by the modern-day generation. Just plain "yes" has been reduced to the low form of "0.K." Though, where this abbreviation comes from, no one seems to know. There are other slang words that have largely taken over the already limited vocabulary of teenagers. A "square" is no longer a plain rectangle with equal sides; it now means a person who doesn t go along with the crowd. Superlatives have become very popular exclamatory words like, "great," "tremendous," and "terrific." A "flick ' is known as a movie, while "grimey" serves to express something distasteful or discolored. Another expression is "strictly from hunger," which is used to describe someone completely beyond help. It's obvious that to get along today, you must have a little knowledge of "teen terms." This may serve as a short lesson. If a "cool cat" walks over to you and says, "Man, I dig you the most," don't look like a "sq...

Publication Title: Monocle, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Monocle — 17 February 1955

February 17, 1955 Jayem Suffers Defeat To Glass; Still First In District J.M. Takes 4th Defeat Of Season Ready for Jeffs Tomorrow Night John Marshall suffered its fourth setback of the year by E. C. Glass of Lynchburg last Saturday night by a score of 53-49. Leading most of the way through the first half, the Justices were caught just before the buzzer to end the half went off; and they trailed by one point when it ended. From here on in, Glass led the rest of the way, assisted by a very high percentage from the foul line. Don Goode was high for Jayem with 20 points. Tomorrow night, the Jayem-Teejay clash at the Richmond Arena is the spotlighted event here. John Marshall, number one in the district, will meet Thomas Jefferson, the number two team for their second joust of the season. Jayem won the first. Hoping for a large crowd, both teams are all out for this game, and it should be a good one. After tomorrow night, Jayem has two more games in the regular season; both at the arena....

Publication Title: Monocle, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Monocle — 17 February 1955

Page Four A Model of Ambition— Seay Accepts Daily Routine Everett Seay is back in school, but not because the truant officer caught him or his mother wouldn't allow him to loaf around the house all day. He himself decided to return to school so that he might obtain that sought after object—a diploma. To the passer-by in the halls, there is nothing outstanding about Everett Seay to denote him from his fellow sophomores. Homeroom 210 accepts him as just another classmate. The fact remains, though. Mr. Seay is 28 years old. Although he stopped attending Thomas Jefferson High School several years ago, recently he has strongly desired to complete his high school education. Mr. Seay hopes that with one semester of work at John Marshall he can pass the State Board of exams and thereby receive his diploma. Once he has his diploma, Mr. Seay tentatively plans to become a minister of music. At the present time he teaches piano and organ during the late afternoon and into the evening. Orchestra...

Publication Title: Monocle, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Monocle — 3 March 1955

TELL 'EM YOU SAW'IT IN THE MONOCLE XXVI No. 9 ■|L „'MWHijij ■LJ' ,ym| nra ll ■Fm Mr % MMWiMw ■F « JT ™ Jg —Monofoto by Leo COMMITTEE MEMBERS —The newly elected members of the Executive Committee of the Student Association are, left to right, Mickey Kerneklian, Betty Sue Barbee, Scott Wagner, and Jean Ormand. Four Students To Fill Office On Committee Ormand, Kerneklian, Barbee, Wagner Chosen In the regular meeting of the executive committee Monday a week ago, the following seniors were elected as representatives to the executive committee: Betty Sue Barbee, Jean Ormand, Scott Wagner, and Mickey Kerneklian. These students succeed Nancy Meyers, Betsy Ross, Tommy Jones, and Dolly Reynolds. Students are selected for the committee by their good citizenship, ambition and leadership, and sound reasoning. Betty Sue Barbee, a senior in 207, has proved her executive ability by serving as treasurer of the Literary Society. She is also in the National Honor Society and on the Marshallite staff. ...

Publication Title: Monocle, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Monocle — 3 March 1955

Page Two Paperßornßefore Crash In 1929, 26 years ago this past Tuesday, amid the chaos of the Wall Street crash, The Monocle made its entrance. To the outside world it was of no unprecedented importance, but to J.M. students, past and present, it was the founding of a most important institution. The first Monocle, an 8-page edition featuring the picture of J. Fulmer Bright, the Mayor of Richmond and first subscriber, was distributed on March 1, 1929. The Monocle was conceived and established by Miss Charles Anthony, John Marshall English teacher, now retired, who served as faculty adviser 24 of The Monocle's 26 year history. During that span of time she saw such present-day notables as Frank J. McCarthy, Hollywood movie producer and first editor-in-chief, pass through the ranks of The Monocle Staff. Since that first March 1, many a Marshallite has sweated out a deadline, racked his brain over a headline or wrangled an ad from a skeptical merchant, but he enjoyed every busy minute of...

Publication Title: Monocle, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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