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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1988

PAGE 14 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1988 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is one of a series of articles written by Grace Cash of Flowery Branch, Georgia. Watch for more of her stories in the future. In 1920, in the month of April, Mama had a strikingly beautiful blue-eyed, black-haired baby girl - her last baby at Papa's Place. She had five older children, born with blue eyes and black hair, which in most cases turned to various shades of brown. But Mama knew this child was special, just as other people recognized the same thing, when Mama started taking her out in what she called "company". From the first, there were offers to adopt Ruth, or what was called then "taking her to raise". The people passing Papa's Place, on the narrow county road, admired the new baby when they stopped and talked a while with Papa and Mama. A daily passerby was a mailman in his buggy. He knew the names of Mama's children, and he did favors for her, such as selling bushels of peach seeds in town, and bringing her...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1988

When I was very young my life was enriched by knowing my Great-Aunt, Texas Cockram. I really did not know how much until I got older. She lived near Meadows of Dan, Virginia in the year of 1911. She was a big fat, jolly person and laughed a lot. Sometimes I think she did this to hide her real feelings. When I was a child, I would talk to her. She seemed to always know what I was going to say before I got through talking. One day I was asking her some questions and she began to answer them before I got through asking them. I was young, but it bothered me for anyone to know so much about my mind. She would always look into my eyes when I talked to her. One day she was talking to me and I looked off and she said, "Honey, look at me when you talk to me and I can understand you better". She was around 80 years old and had lived through many hard times. Her family was just about all gone. In her long life she had gathered a lot of wisdom and wit. I was glad she could share it with others....

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1988

PAGE 16 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1988 A DAY ON GRANDPA'S FARM BY: LINDA COLLINS ©I9BB Whenever summer came around, I always looked forward to going to Floyd County, Virginia. My mother, my brother and I went to see my grandparents. We practically always stayed two weeks, but my dad usually stayed at home because he liked city life better. He got bored on the farm. Golfing was his favorite pastime and there aren't too many golf courses in the country. My grandma, Ava Bolt, was in the hospital most of the time. Grandpa, Clark Bolt, had a 90 acre farm in one of the most beautiful places I've ever seen. My aunt and uncle, Arthur and Ethel McAlexander, and five cousins lived on the adjoining farm. When we would get to Virginia, we would pick up Grandma and bring her to the farm too. There was always something to do. Even work seemed like fun to me. Grandpa had two huge gardens, which we worked in and picked the fresh vegetables to cook and eat. There were many fruit trees, and grapevines tha...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1988

When I was a little girl there was no place I would rather go visit, then to my Grandma Moore's. Not that I was all that fond of my grandma. I loved and respected her, but she was very strict and stern with kids. We called her bossy, not to her face, of course. When she spoke to a kid, that kid moved or it was in trouble. My brother Johnny sometimes did get in trouble with her because he was stubborn and didn't move fast enough. Grandpa was a quiet, easy going man, he was always nice to us kids, but he was a busy man and had little time for playing with his grandkids. I suppose he was tired from trying to keep food in the mouth and clothes on the back of his own ten. Their two youngest daughters, Florance and Rosa Lee, were still living at home, and they treated all of us grandkids so great, each of us thought we were their favorite. They had all the patience in the world. They would let me help with milking the cows, feeding the pigs and sometimes gathering in the eggs from the hen...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1988

PAGE 18 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1988 BACKROADS (Continued from page 24.) from beginning to end. However, we recommend at least two days and you'll wish for a week after you've seen it. Take along the camera, the kids, the family pet and you'll all enjoy the Highlands. 00.0 (00.0) We will begin our tour at Exit 37 (Mile Post 118) on Interstate 81. This is the U.S. 11/460 exit to Christiansburg, Virginia. Travelling north we will leave 1-81 on Exit 37. 0.3 (00.3) At this stop sign we are at the end of the exit ramp coming off of 1-81 and we will turn left onto Highway 460 west and U.S. 11 south heading towards Christiansburg, Virginia. (NOTE: If you reach the point of beginning by travelling south on 1-81 you will turn right at this point onto U.S. 11/460 west.) 1.3 (1.0) Here we will turn right following 460 west towards Blacksburg, Virginia Tech and Bluefield. 4.1 (2.8) We are entering the corporate limits of Christiansburg, Virginia. 6.9 (2.8) Here 460 Business West turns right leadin...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1988

THE STATE OF POLITICS IN AMERICA'S 51ST STATE, CUMBERLAND About a year ago, we did a Backroad tour into Scott County, Virginia and by Natural Tunnel State Park. At that time, we learned of a complex tounge-in-cheek subversive plot going on in that area. Cumberland Gap is surrounded by three counties in Virginia (Wise, Scott and Lee), Tennessee (Claiborne, Hancock and Hawkins), and Kentucky (Bell, Harlan and Knox) who decided they had more in common with each other than they did with their own state capitols. In a spirit of cooperation and a lot of fun poking at politics, they decided to secede from the Union and form the 51st state - The Great State of Cumberland. On May 4, 1987, they declared InterDependance Day. Shortly thereafter, they held Gubernatorial and state cabinet elections, designed a flag, the whole works. Cumberland was off and running, promoting travel to their fine state and having a whole lot of fun doing it. Cumberland is an equal opportunity state and it was no su...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1988

PAGE 20 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1988 BACKROADS (Continued from page 18.) 29.2 (4.2) On our right is a sign marking the entrance to the Mountain Lake property. 30.1 (0.9) The cottages on our left and the beautiful stone Mountain Lake Resort on our right were recently featured in the movie Dirty Dancing. Directly ahead we can see the lake. Mountain Lake, with it's beautiful setting, is reminiscent of the era of elegant and luxurious resorts so popular around the turn of the century. Mountain Lake, unlike many of its contemporaries, has continued to prosper and today offers the discriminating vacationer the choice of excellence amid beautiful scenery. It is like entering another world, high above and far removed from the present day hustle and bustle. 30.4 (0.3) We will continue past the resort and cottages following the road as it winds its way alongside side of this beautiful mountaintop lake. At this high elevation, hemlock trees are abundant and provide the lake with a dark green back...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1988

COCKRAMS GENERAL „„, STORE t .o\V u ln ws\ FREEMAN COCKRAM, ° & PROPRIETOR FLOYD FARM SERVICE Stores Located Side By Side LOCUST STREET, FLOYD, VA. PHONE: 703-745-4761 HOMEMADE MOUNTAIN MUSIC fit EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT COUNTRY Left to Right: A.D. Wilson, Bass; Glen Wilson, Guitar; Bill WICCt Moran, Banjo; Alton Vest, Fiddle and Freeman Cockram, Dobro. QJgj] WIISOII Cockram's General Store is actively continuing the traditional role of an old country store. We operate six days a week 7 to 7 and close on Sunday, but each Friday evening, about 7 o'clock, friends, neighbors & company start Get the very best lawn and garden, and farm advise at Floyd Farm drifting in the store, The first hint that something special is about to happen is Service! Glen Wilson has recently joined our staff. Glen retired in a glimpse of an elderly lady carrying a guitar into the store. Ry 7:30 or so, November of 1987 from the ASCS office in Floyd with a total of 32 Freeman's got his dobro ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1988

PAGE 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1988 BACKROADS (Continued from page 20.) September 13, 1761. Long known as Wood's River it later came to be called the New River. After passing the historical markers we will cross over the beautiful New River. As we cross the bridge consider that prior to the Revolutionary War, Mary Draper Ingles followed the rugged course of this river on her way home from Ohio after she had been kidnapped by Indians near the present day site of Radford, Virginia. There is an outdoor drama, "The Long Way Home" performed on the site of the family homeplace, within sight of Mary Draper Ingles grave. The part of Mary Draper Ingles is played by one of her direct descendants. 45.4 (1.2) To our left is towering Pearis Mountain. 48.0 (2.6) Here Route 100 and 460 Business exit off of 460 west. We will continue straight ahead on 460 west which is the bypass. Do not exit at this point. 49.0 (1.0) Here we cross another bridge over the New River. As we cross the bridge we can see ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1988

BACKROADS (Continued from page 22.) ahead on Route 100 south. 77.3 (5.8) The Farley Memorial Wayside is on our right at this point. The Wayside offers creekside picnic facilities. Just after passing the Farley Memorial Wayside we will cross a bridge over Big Waller Creek. 79.5 (2.2) Here we bear right across a bridge over Big Waller Creek continuing to follow Route 100 south. This community, as we cross over Big Waller Creek, is known as Staffordsville, Virginia. 81.1 (1.6) Here we cross a small bridge over Wabash Creek. 82.6 (1.5) We are now entering the community of Poplar Hill, Virginia. 84.1 (1.5) We are now leaving Giles County and entering Pulaski County, Virginia. 84.3 (0.2) Almost immediately after crossing the county line we will cross a bridge over Little Walker Creek. We are now passing through another portion of Jefferson National Forest. 85.2 (0.9) We have just reached the crest of Cloyd's Mountain. It is the sight of the annual Civil War reenactment usually held on Jul...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1988

"The Heart of the Blue Ridge" JLaurel ' V WW-'!? CL Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life May 1988 Volume 5 Number 2 $1.25 PAGE 24 HOW TO FOLLOW BACKROAD TOURS. BACKROAD tours always make a complete loop back to the point where we started. The underlined numbers at the beginning of each paragraph indicate the total number of miles we've traveled from our point of beginning. The numbers in parenthesis () indicate the distance from the last point of interest that we passed. * BACKROAIS "Never take the main roads, they're the future with their stores, offices and service stations. Always travel the backroads. You can see the future tomorrow but backroads are the past and someday they may be gone. On backroads you can see old weathered barns with wagons and horse drawn hayrakes. There are meadows fenced with old chestnut rails and creeks that bubble and cascade over rocks that have never known polution. There's a part of our heritage on our backroads that no pen or camera will ever capture. ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1988

EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is one of a series of articles written by Grace Cash of Flowery Branch, Georgia. Watch for more of her stories in the future. In 1927 I was twelve years old and in the Seventh Grade, not an ordinary seventh grade, but a grade that started with capital letters. That school year the big boys and big girls, who had dropped out of school in past years, came back to Miss Essie's room to get more education. Some came back who had completed seven grades, but wanted to review Arithmetic and English, needed for the jobs they hoped to get, now that the Chicopee Manufacturing Company had set up a big plant eight miles north of Chestnut Mountain. Other cotton mills were opening their doors to workers who didn't live in the villages. Several farm girls worked as housekeepers in the homes of public workers, and they got paid three dollars and board for each week's work. The big boys and big girls were preparing for jobs and new clothes and Model-A Fords and Chevrolets...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1988

r- * * *» PAGE 2 MOUNTAIN LAUREL OCTOBER, 1988 MISS ESSIES (Continued from page 1.) bow, now to the gents..Back to your partners..And promenade home!" The sets would vary, and he revised and designed sets as he wished. The sets and figures were followed without a hitch. The big shouldered man who called the sets had a strong speaking and singing voice, and he would sometimes sing, and just let the dancers whirl themselves around without pattern. When the band played "Dixieland" he sang out, in tune with the fiddlers' spirited music: "I wish I was in the land of cotton, Old times there are not forgotten, Look away, look away, Dixieland!, Then I wish I was in Dixie, Hoo-ray, hoo-ray!, In Dixieland 111 take my stand, To live or die in Dixie..., Away, away, away down south in Dixie, Away, away, away down south in Dixie, In Dixieland where I was born, Early on one frost morn', Look away, look away, Dixieland!" His singing made all of us happy. The last one of us, old and young, thought t...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1988

OZARK DREAMS / . • « /« A v (Continued from page 2.) Henry were standing looking at me as if I were a ghost or a witch or a spook. They were skinny and real tall to be just fourteen and fifteen years old. They had a thick mop of yellow sun bleached hair that almost covered their ears and disappeared at the back down their tattered shirt collars. Their patched calf length overalls showed sun browned ankles and bare feet. Joe Henry was carrying a heavy twenty-two gauge rifle. They just looked at me. I just looked at them. Then we all three just looked at Lil Young Sam as he stumbled up the hill breathing low and sobbing loud as he wiped his runny nose on his raggedy sleeve. Joe Henry looked up at me and said, "Hits the danged truth. He haint no good fur huntin' rabbits. Hit jest naterally looks lik' he haint never goin' to learn to trail 'em or tree 'em or no other danged possums or coons neither." Lil Young Sam said between sobs, "This here big toe, hits my toe," and he reached down ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1988

PAGE 4 MOUNTAIN LAUREL OCTOBER, 1988 It had been hot. The kind of heat that seemed to settle into the hollows at mid day and deepen into the afternoon. The sycamore and poplar leaves appeared to have lost some of their crispness and the sour wood bushes had already started to add a splash of crimson to the appellations. A welcome shower had offered some respite from the August heat to man and beast of the Cumberlands. A powerfully built man in a dark well-worn suit, strode easily along what resembled a narrow mountain road - a bible under his arm. Looking back he spoke to his wife in her sun bonnet and long full skirted dress. "Sarah, you and Martha keep the least-uns with you and I'll try to keep in sight of these two young Dan'll Boones up ahead." Then calling sharply to his sons he warned, "Now remember boys we have 20 miles to walk today, so don't wear yourselves out climbing trees." His wife answered in her quiet composed voice, "The two little-uns are right here with us. But J...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1988

RELIGION (Continued from page 4.) some fighting from time to time. By the time Pa and I had done our business we had seen one fight and the start of another one. But like Pa says, If a person goes there on business he's not likely to have any trouble." Martha, having reached the edge of the clearing saw her mother pull back the side of her sun bonnet and cast a watchful eye in their direction. Then of all things, her 14 year old brother James (pronounced Jeems by the mountain people) came running over and joined them. After he exchanged greetings with Billy he hung with them like a leach. She tried a broad hint. "Jeems, I allow Mother might need you to help her with something over yonder." Jeems answered gaily. "No, she's all through with the meal and is a settin there with Pa. I git awful tired of this singin and preachin. I'll be right glad to just walk with you and Billy." Martha's head spun with annoyance as she thought to herself. Land sakes, first it's that fiesty girl then it...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1988

PAGE 6 MOUNTAIN LAUREL OCTOBER, 1988 BY: MARLYS BRADLEY HUFFMAN cim Some people think Lucy Belle Adkins got what she deserved. A few others clucked their tongues against the top of their mouths and rolled their eyes upward. Even the ones who patted Lucy Belle's shoulder admitted privately that putting on airs inevitably brought disaster. Me and Georgy listened to the uproar and slid down the hillside to our favorite fishing hole. We were with the "she - got - what - she - deserved crowd. Lucy Belle put on airs. But worst of all, Lucy Belle Adkins was our teacher. In school we had to call her Mrs. Adkins but the rest of the time we called her, "Old Lucy Belle". Old Lucy Belle made out lives miserable all school year. She bragged. Most of all she bragged about her conveniences. All of us had to run through the rain and slip down a hillside to our own version of an outhouse, both at home and at school. Not Old Lucy Belle. She'd talked her husband into building a covered walkway from th...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1988

I think most Senior Citizens like to hear good things that has come into other people's lives. I believe they are hoping that something good will come into their lives in their Senior years to cheer them along too. Keep hoping, for this could happen. I am going to tell you a true story that happened a few years ago in my family to my husband's nephew and wife. Richard Collins called me one beautiful fall day in October 1986 and asked me if it would be all right if he and his wife Lady Ethel paid me a visit the next day. They live in Roanoke, Virginia. I said that would be fine, but what is all this about "Lady Ethel"? I knew his wife's name was Ethel, but he never had called her "Lady Ethel" before. He said he would tell me all about it when they got here. He said they would arrive in a royal procession complete with chauffeured limousine and a personal body guard. He also said he would go by my daughter's home in Danville and bring her on down with them. I told Richard I would make...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1988

PAGE 8 MOUNTAIN LAUREL OCTOBER, 1988 After the football game, I quickly showered, dressed and jumped in my dad's old sedan and headed home for a change of clothes. The other high school kids converged on the local hang outs, while I was escaping suburban life and heading for my grandparents' home in the country. I eased the car over the rocky, quarter mile road bed that led to their home. I opened the old wooden gate and pulled the car through. After shutting the gate, I paused for a few minutes and looked at the old, brick-sided, farm house sitting on top of the hill. Its outline was barely visible in the darkness. All the lights were out except for the oil lamp burning in the dining room window. My father's words came back to me of how he and his brothers traveled this very same road late at night as youngsters. I know first hand what my father meant by the warm and secure feeling they received in seeing the light in the window when coming home. It was a beacon of love that gather...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1988

"Girlie! Girlie! Come home for supper," Ma (Grandma) called from below the stairs. "Girlie, your Mom is calling." Coming down the stairs, with its shining polished old wood paneled banister, while holding my battered tin headed doll carefully in my arms, I felt the cool air in Ma's spotless living room. Ma reprimanded my cousin Babe and me. She said, "Why do you girls play in the attic on this lovely summer day?" We played mother's with our dolls for hours, in a tiny attic room, with a low ceiling, that we called our play house. I loved my only doll for as long as I could remember. It had a cloth stuffed body and a molded tin head that had some nicks and paint chipped off, especially on its nose, but I thought it was beautiful. Then I went skipping across the narrow mountain road to my rambling home in the Blue Ridge Mountains. Pop and Mom were both waiting for me on our big front porch with my little brother, Arthur, and Babe played with her doll while Ma prepared the evening meal....

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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