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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1998

August 1998 'Global' politics will make all Virginians suffer All Virginians will suffer painful new energy taxes or fuel rationing if the "Global Climate Change Treaty," recently negotiated in Kyoto, Japan, by Vice President Al Gore, takes effect. Farm families in Virginia will bear an especially high burden of higher energy prices and taxes under the vice president's scheme. To make matters worse, the Clinton Administration's Environmental Protection Agency and other federal bureaucracies are taking steps to impose the Kyoto treaty's restrictions on Americans even though the treaty has not been—and is unlikely ever to be—ratified by the U.S. Senate. The Kyoto agreement calls for the United States and many other developed nations around the world to reduce emissions of "greenhouse gases" including carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. The U.S. would be EPA may overstate risks of asbestos There's no telling how much money has been spent on ripping asbestos out of buildings, pa...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1998

Farm Bureau News Money available for saving forest, farmland By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—Money is available to help prevent development of farm and forestlands, but the deadline for application is Sept. I. Preserving farmland and forestland is so important that a state agency, the Virginia Outdoors Foundation, will help pay for fees associated with placing such land in conservation easements. A conservation easement is a voluntary legal agreement between a landowner and public body or conservation group in which the parties agree to protect the open space and natural resource value of the land. VOF is often the holder of easements. Conservation ease- ments held by VOF usually restrict mining, industrial, commercial and high-density residential uses while allowing farming and forestry activities to continue, said Tamara Vance, VOF executive director. "When you leave this place, you can't take it with you," said Plan helps water quality (Continued from page 1) amou...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1998

August 1998 Organic will never replace traditional farming By 808 ELLISON American Farm Bureau Federation It wasn't that long ago that organic farming was considered something done on communes to buck the "system." Organic advocates touted the glories of food raised without synthetic chemicals on very small-scale operations. The downside of this agrarian Utopia was usually a lower quality product and plants and livestock handicapped by pests and disease. But the times— they are a changin'. Less than 3 percent Organic products account for less than 3 percent of total U.S. crop production and there's not a chance organic production will replace traditional farming. Whether some consumers believe organics are healthier, chic or a protest against Virginia celebration to showcase produce RICHMOND—The Virginia Harvest Celebration on Sept. 20 will present 25 of the areas finest chefs, cooking Virginia's freshest foods produced by 25 of our finest farmers. The Sunday event will be at Richmo...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1998

Farm Bureau News Buffers are key to good water quality in state By SALLY MILLS Editor's note: Sally Mills is a freelance writer who specializes in natural resource protection and conservation issues. She has written for a number of publications for state agencies, local governments, and local grassroots organizations. Imagine you're out in your johnboat or canoe —fishing on your favorite tidal creek. A mid-afternoon shower blows down the river. Where do you go? If you're in an upland stretch of water above the wide meanders of the flat coastal plain, you'll likely head for the shoreline and pull your boat under a large tree canopy shading the river's edge. As you wait out the storm, you have time to study the shoreline. A dense root system of knotty "fingers" holds the riverbank securely in place. On the water's surface all around your boat are leaves, twigs, ribbon-like grasses and plant shoots, and water striders jumping an imaginary hopscotch game. You've just entered the "ripari...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1998

August 1 998 Conservation tillage still increasing in use (Continued from page 1) described by the state's Natural Resources Conservation Service as any tillage and planting system that leaves at least 30 percent of a soil surface covered by mulch or the previous year's crop residue, is not new. "This area of the state is where no-till production started," said Ed Overton, commercial horticulture Extension agent for james City County. "According to the anecdotes I've heard, no-till was started in Charles City County in the '605." Conservation tillage has grown and expanded over the last three decades, and research is currently underway on no-till cotton, vegetables and even tobacco, Brann said. By not disturbing the soil, notill helps reduce soil erosion. "Notill holds the land so much better and keeps it from washing (away)," Watkins explained. Between 1982 and 1992, soil erosion on highly erodible cropland was reduced 21 percent, according to the most recent soil study by the NRCS...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1998

Farm Bureau News Tasty varieties available at farmers' markets By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—Juicy tomatoes, corn as sweet as molasses and potatoes that were dug yesterday— these are the fresh delights available at Virginia's 53 retail farmers' markets. Virginians are swinging by local farmers' markets to buy the freshest fruits and vegetables in town. They often meet the farmer who grew the produce. Some shoppers find a farmer who will plant a special variety just for them. "If someone says he or she likes a different variety of beans than we have, then we'll try to grow it for them," said Mike Clark, a vegetable grower in Stafford County. "You can grow some beans in 60 days, but you'll have more trouble trying to grow tomatoes and peppers in a short time," Clark said. He and his wife, Gayle, sell produce at the farmers' market in Garrisonville. It's an open-air market, with six to eight vendors selling produce under canopies and from the back of pickup trucks. Li...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1998

August 1998 / flfft 1 ' JStyuflHp -JB m ~ —.—— i Farmers market busier now than anticipated By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor OAK GROVE—The doors opened in June, and within a few weeks, 100 to 150 truckloads of produce began shipping out of the Northern Neck Farmers Market each week. "That's a lot of product," said Rod Parker, the market's general manager. "We've got quite a lot of activity. This is quicker than anticipated." • The $2.8 million Northern Neck facility in Westmoreland County is the third of four wholesale markets to open in Virginia. The fourth was recently completed in Southampton County. Northern Neck's market began as an idea nearly 10 years ago among farmers who wanted to pool their resources and create a shipping point for fresh vegetables. Markets' customer base continues to increase (Continued from page 8) shopped at the market each day. The market is so important to the Richmond City Council that it appointed a Farmers' Market Commission and hired a farme...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1998

Farm Bureau News Retail Farmers' Markets in Virginia Annandale Farmers' Market Downtown South Boston Mathews Farmers' Market Roanoke Historic City Farmers' Contact: Jack Baggett Farmers' Market Contact: Mathews Extension Market 703-642-5173 Contact: Jerry Lewis Office Contact: Ashley Waldvogel 804-575-5233 804-725-7196 540:342-2028 Appomattox Farmers' Market Contact: Bob Heater Eastern Loudoun Farmers' Market McLean Farmers' Market Salem Farmers' Market 804-352-2621 (Cascades) Contact: Jack Baggett Contact: Beth Carson Contact: Joan Broome 703-642-5173 540-375-3028 Arlington County 540-882-3048 Farmers' Market Mechanicsville Farmers' Market Saluda Outdoor Farmers' Market Contact: Elizabeth Montgomery Fairfax Extension Farmers' Market Contact: Tim Etheridge Contact: David Moore 703-358-6400 Contact: Jack Baggett 804-798-5124 804-758-4120 703-642-5173 Bedford Farmers' Market Middleburg Farmers' Market Staunton-Augusta Farmers' Contact: Elizabeth Berry-Mosley Falls Church Farmers' Mark...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1998

August 1998 Poultry litter saves big in commercial fertilizer (Continued from page 2) for 200 bushels per acre because it won't produce that. The crop will absorb the fertilizer I put down. "I can go to bed at night and sleep well knowing I'm protecting the environment and the water," Arey noted. "We have well water. We also have three children ages 15, 13 and 11. 1 hope to take care of my land so that I can pass it on to my children." Charles Schooley raises 120,000 turkeys each year, as well as beef cattle, on his Augusta County farm. He's had a nutrient management plan since 1989. Schooley had DCR develop a plan so he would know how much turkey litter to apply to his fields and how much to cut back on commercial fertilizer. By using turkey litter, he saves $7,500 in commercial fertilizer each year. He's certain he's not hurting the environment, Schooley said. "Poultry litter has helped the whole farm operation," he noted. "The pastures have a heavier grass cover, which prevents e...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1998

Farm Bureau News (A Free Service to Members) Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau News accepts classified advertisements only from members of the Virginia Farm Bureau. One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each member. If the ad runs more than 15 words, then the member must pay $5. Ads over 30 words will not be accepted. > Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please TYPE your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. (You do not have to use this coupon.) I Classified ads WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. > DEADLINE: The September and October issues will be combined and the deadline is Aug. 15 I Repeat ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each issue in which they will appear. I Ads MUST include member number to be published. (For your convenience we are providing this coupon.) NAME: MEMBER NO.: COUNTY: ADDRESS: CITY: STATE: ZIP: DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER: ( ) ADVERTISEMENT: (Pl...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1998

August 1998 Your ideas, inventions could win a national prize It was on a Virginia farm in 1831 that a 22-year-old farmer, Cyrus McCormick, invented the world's first mechanical grain reaper. He ushered in a new era in agri-culture-an age of mechanization that allowed millions of people to leave the farm and enter an industrial society. For centuries, laborers had harvested grain manually with a long knife, such as a sickle or scythe. The horse-drawn McCormick Reaper harvested five times faster than any previous method. Like McCormick, perhaps you've invented a handy gadget on you farm, and would like to share it with others. If you're a young farmer, age 18-35, here's your The Formers Market (Continued from page 12) mower with 18 HP Onan engine. Excellent condition. 804-779-3537. FOR SALE — Bottle collection, over 700 cobalt blue, medicine soda, Clorox, milk glass bottles. 540-674-5462. GREENHOUSE — 26 x 83 hoops (unassembled), furnace 80,000 BTU. 540-947-2301. SATELLITE SERVICE CE...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1998

Farm Bureau News Farm woman contest ready for nominations Calling all superwomen—super farm women, that is. It's time to give credit where credit is due. So many farm women work behind the scenes, day in and day out, but rarely get recognized for their contributions to agriculture. That's why the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Women's Committee sponsors the annual Farm Woman of the Year contest. If you know a farm woman who works hard on her family farm, nominate her for our 1999 Farm Woman of the Year award. Jackie Easter, our 1998 Farm Woman of the Year, said it's very worthwhile. AITC raises $ 105,000 in fiscal year The Virginia Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom has just ended its 1997-1998 fiscal year, and preliminary accounting of gifts and pledges put the total raised by the foundation at more than $105,000. In addition, the foundation has received a $25,000 challenge grant from the Commonwealth of Virginia. Training and materials The foundation receives gifts from ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1998

August 1998 1 " T r 1 I I Sl :+1 ißw IJ. Li . MHBMtI >}. Ll 1 I T%-1 J h 111 FSMeWIBIPJ 'Mtt**-sr*' ▼ ■■ * *5W ». ■ KHf r !■ Charles Schooley is shown with some of the 120,000 turkeys he raises each year. Advertisement "A Thinner You! Melt Pounds Away Safely With Vinegar" Amazing And Ultimate simple muscle toning), no dieting or f FAT I Weanon Against Fat ingesting harmful diet pills - ™ 91 £M YYCdpuii /\gctIIKM reti... It , seasyj safe? convenientand you .NO p. |ls! CANTON (special) -If you seriously don't have to starve yourself thin. . jyq Dieting! want to lose weight and keep it off, The secret? Food proportion, #Nn r „| ftrip rmintino » take a look at vinegar. vinegar and thermogenesis - ® ' It's true! Vinegar expert, Emily (process of your body burning fat 11 * ore nvvanted Flab - Thacker says in her new book that to create energy). And Emily states, vinegar safely helps speed up "it works!" Ki Waler? Fo « d Color? "? no J oke ' metabolism to burn unwanted Doctors a...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1998

Over 12 Health Insurance Plans To Choose From. Not everyone has the same Medical needs... Choice! Plus not everyone has the same budget for Health Insurance...That's why Virginia Farm Bureau offers a Choice of Health care programs and options. Why pay for coverage you do not need? Best Value Now you can choose a plan which will give you the coverage you For Your Dollar: need... and will fit your budget. ■JHEt |j We believe quality protection and personal service go hand in hand. \ I|| ' Personal Service: With over 100 local Farm Bureau offices throughout Virginia, \ \ AjjHpp?^personalized service can be as close as your own community. } Jfe Broad Range of m jf y OU are unc j er a g e 55 — f or Individuals or families Coverage • jf y G u are over age 65 — Medicare supplement • If you are a small business — coverage for 2-99 employees. available through farm bureau for members only. IffiM j You choose the health care plan that fits your needs... and your budget! ■Unl. J No-till practi...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1998

Farm Bureau v News Volume 57, Number 8 Outlawing pesticides would hurt many growers By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—Insects, diseases and weeds threaten to destroy crops each season, and farmers must rely on pesticides to protect America's food source. But the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has indicated it may seek to outlaw certain key pesticides. EPA officials say this is necessary to lower the cancer rate among Americans, safeguard the environment and better protect infants and children. However, cancer mortality rates, excluding lung cancer, have declined 16 percent since 1950 in the United States, said a report from the National Center for Policy Analysis. Dr. Leonard Gianessi, senior economist at the National Center for Food and Agricultural Policy, is a consultant to EPA. If EPA outlawed key pesticides, major crop losses would occur, Gianessi said. Plus, growers would face escalating costs for effective insect control. Even worse, insect resistance to r...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1998

Farm Bureau News Women now seen as farmers in own right By CHRISTY McKAY Special to the Farm Bureau News RICHMOND —A shadowy figure on a distant tractor raises a hand skyward and waves. As the tractor nears, the dusty blue jeans, pale yellow T-shirt and ball cap come into view. The face beneath the hat is a woman's. One might have expected to see a man's. Farm women say the picture of Old Mac Donald's farm with all the animals is missing something— Mrs. Mac Donald. "Old Mac Donald can't care for the farm by himself," said farmer Laura Stanley of Hanover County, who is also the county's Farm Bureau president. "Farming is beyond milking a cow just for your family or raising a few chickens." In the past, farmers like Mrs. Stanley have been called "farmers' wives." Today, women are finally recognized as farmers in their own right. Their roles on the farm go far beyond making dinner. Their roles are expanding. "Women have always been involved. They just weren't always noticed," said Mrs....

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1998

September/October 1998 Subsidies help ensure safe, abundant food Heat, drought and reduced exports to Asia have caused projected farm income to drop $7.5 billion this year. But that's lot an unusual scenario. There have been plenty of years in which farmers' income was hurt b} natural disasters or politica roadblocks. That's one reason farm subsidies are so important. They supplement farmers when times are lean, through no fault of their own. To help farmers this year, President Clinton signed a bill which allows farmers to get an advance payment of 1999 subsidies beginning Oct. 1. The bill No American immune to FQPA consequences Bill Spencer, like many of his agricultural brethren, has much riding on how the Environmental Protection Agency implements the Food Quality Protection Act. As a citrus producer, he knows if EPA elim- inates vital crop protections, his family operation could face the prospect of going out of business. For a person who has followed in the footsteps of his gr...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1998

Farm Bureau News Most ag jobs ore in urban areas, study shows (Continued from page 1) "There is a perception that this is an industry that's dead or dying or only of minor economic importance to any state," said Carlton Courter, the state's commissioner of agriculture. "Here we were able to take the numbers and show that that is not the case. This is actually an industry that is very healthy, very bright and is actually growing and expanding." That kind of data is especially important when dealing with the legislative arena, Courter noted. "The way the pipeline is put together today, it's difficult for folks to appreciate the stable, low cost of food that allows them to buy a bigger house and second or third car," Courter added. Americans spend only 10.9 percent of their income on food, while Mexicans spend 33.2 percent. The figure is more than I 7 percent in Italy, Germany, and Japan. The Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics at Virginia Tech conducted the study for VDAC...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1998

September/October 1998 $500 says this becomes your favorite farm animal. Ram The New Dodge m |||jpqM| ■M^jMfaj|||||j 1-877-ON THE-JOB $500 Cash Back to Barm Bureau® Members* ° wm4ad " dgecom We're betting you're going to like having Dodge trucks on the farm. So we're giving eligible This cash back °? er ls valid f ° r members Farm Bureau®members $ 500 cash back on all new 1998 and 1999 Ram Regular, Club, and is Quad Cab ™ pickups. You can choose from our full line of Magnum ® engines, too, including the sub Jf ;t ,0 11 may not be used in V-6, V-8, V-10, and Cummins Turbo Diesel ** We're also offering $ 500 cash back on 1999 Dakotas certificate program or certain other special with a Magnurr. V-6 or V-8 engine. And even our Ram Vans and Ram Passenger Wagons are programs. Ask for restrictions and details. , , , , .. trn/ , , , , ... , A,f J J • Farm Bureau* is a registered service mark part of the deal, with *500 cash back on new 98 and 99 models in Stock All you need to do IS of the ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1998

Farm Bureau News Most ag jobs are in urban areas, study shows (Continued from page 1) "There is a perception that this is an industry that's dead or dying or only of minor economic importance to any state," said Carlton Courter. the state's commissioner of agriculture. "Here we were able to take the numbers and show that that is not the case. This is actually an industry that is very healthy, very bright and is actually growing and expanding." That kind of data is especially important when dealing with the legislative arena, Courter noted. "The way the pipeline is put together today, it's difficult for folks to appreciate the stable, low cost of food that allows them to buy a bigger house and second or third car," Courter added. Americans spend only 10.9 percent of their income on food, while Mexicans spend 33.2 percent. The figure is more than 17 percent in Italy, Germany, and Japan. The Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics at Virginia Tech conducted the study for VDACS...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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