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Title: Pacific Rural Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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MECHANICAL PROGRESS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

MECHANICAL PROGRESS. The "Woolwich Infant." —This is the nickname of the 35-ton gun, which has recently been tested. Nature for May 18th has a notice of it, from which we condense: "That the gun is not merely a show production, as was the case with the monster Krupp cannon, but a really serviceable and efficient fire-arm, is shown by its endurance of the severe test to which it was subjected at prjof. On this occasion the 700 ft. projectile was thrown from the gun by the enormous charge of 130 lbs. of gunpowder—the largest, in fact, that has ever been safely consumed in any fire-arm —the explosion being without the slightost injurious effect upon the steel bore or surrounding wrought-iron castings. The solid cylinder of iron which constituted the shot issued forth at the terrible velocity of 1,370 feet per second, and, after traveling some fifty yards, buried itself in the butt of loose earth to a depth of thirtythree feet. * * It is calculated that at a distance of fifty yards the ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SCIENTIFIC PROGRESS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

SCIENTIFIC PROGRESS. A New Connection fob tiie Induction Coil -Prof. E. J. Houston describes in the Journal of ike Franklin Institute for Juno, some experiments made with a view of increasing the quantity of the spark of the induction coil without greatly diminishing its length. By connecting one of the poles with the eaVth, and the other with a large insulated conductor, a thick quantity spark rive inches in length was obtained with an instrument which throws a six-inch spark in free air. We quote: " One of the poles or ends of the secondary wire was connected with the earth by a copper wire attached to a gas pipe. The other polo was connected with a wire, which rested on a largo lecture table holding the coil. On turning the break piece, the electricity, instead of being lost bypassing along the wires to the earth, jumped from the pole connected with the table, to that connected with the earth. The thickness of the spark was greatly increased, its length diminished, and its color ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CORRESPONDENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

CORRESPONDENCE.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Sanitary Effects of Coal Oil Questioned. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

The Sanitary Effects of Coal Oil Questioned. Editors Press:—Your correspondent was much astonished by a statement which has been going the rounds of the papers of late, purporting to emanate from a distinguished physician of Santa Barbara, ascribing the immunity which that country enjoys from the ravages of such diseases as scariet fever, small-pox, diptheria, chills, and tho like, to the presence of such large quantities of petroloum in that portion of tho State. On perceiving in your last issue that this hypothesis had received the sanction of so eminent an authority as your Santa Barbara correspondent, it becomes necessary to examine the subject more carefully and the result is the unqualified adhesion to tho new doctrine by your present correspondent. The Santa Barbara savans evidently explain tho action of the " poculiar ambrosial influence pervading tho air," by the aid of the germ theory of disease, and the "well known action of carbolic aoid in destroying low forms of animal...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Great Valley of Los Angeles. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

The Great Valley of Los Angeles. Editor Press:—ln your comments upon my letter to Mr. Northam, which was published in your issue of May 13th, your request that some one of your Los Angeles correspondents would give you some information on the character of the soils of this climate. Although I am not included in this category, not having been one of your correspondents, I will endeavor, however, to give you what information I possess in this relation, and as I have not seen an intelligible description of the great valloy of Los Angeles, will premise by giving one as brief as possible. Tho groat valley, or alluvial plain of Los Angelas county, extends from the sea coast north of the isolated hill of Point Pedro, in a southeasterly direction, parallel to the sea coast, a distance of some forty miles in length, by ten to fifteen in width; embracing all the space between the foothills and the sea. This plain is crossed by the San Gabriel and New rivers, which are in fact, tho same stream...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Color of the Norman Horse. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

The Color of the Norman Horse. Editors Press: —I do not wish to bore you on the horse question, and yet I should like to be permitted to answer Mr. "W. C. Myer's note, which appeared in the Press of May 27th. Mr. Myers there states, at some length, that I have made a false statement in regard to the stock of my horse f and also to prove, by authority, that a Norman horse must necessarily be gray, in order to be a Norman; and if he is gray, then he is all right, according to Mr. M.'s logic; for he says, "Young Rawley was sired by Rollin, and imported into Champagne county, Ohio,"—does not say where from. Now, Mr. Myer makes a wrong statement of the above, and still further Ba y ß: _"and was a dapple brown; Rawley jr.'s dam, Lady Jane, was from a French horse, Louis Napoleon, from his own statement," he continues, "his horse Rawley is not more than three-quarters blood." Now Mr. Myer is not excusable for the above statement on any ground but one, and that is, he may not take the Rural...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Personification—California and Oregon. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

Personification—California and Oregon. The following passages were written by Mrs. Frances Fuller Victor, of Oregon, a lady whose genius has given her national fame: I have thought if I were a painter how I would personate California. She should be a girlish Cleopatra; large, supple-limbed, dusky-brown, fiery, yet indolent; voluptuous, yet unconscious; intellectually a queen; really a dreaming romantic maiden. Her throne should be the russet colored hills; her mantle the violet ha?e. Her girdle should be gold; her scepter silver, and her crown the native laurel, mingled with wild oats. Behind her throne should tower the grand Sierras; at her feet should murmur the blue Pacific, stretching far away to where on the horizon a whitewinged fleet fixed the dreamy look in the lustrous dark eyes of my girl-queen. A fair and fascinating picture, is it not? Fit to till a niche of our Western Art Gallery. But opposite to it I would have my Cleopatra's Antony. Young, lithe, strong, und beautifu...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE ORCHARD. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

THE ORCHARD.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Facts About Apples. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

Facts About Apples. Apples dried before they are fully ripened will make more pounds to the bushel than those fully matured. Very large apples will not yield as many pounds of dried apples to the bushel as smaller ones. Large apples have larger sap cells than small ones, and less fibre. Small sized apples will often yield eight potmds of dried apples to the bushel. A bushel of Baldwins will sometimes make nine pounds of dried apples. Apples with thick, close textured skins, keep longer than thin-skinned apples. When a tree overbears the llavor of the fruit is impaired. The flavor of fruit is dependent upon the maturity of the sap through the leaf. The leaves are the expanded lungs of the tree, in which the sap is oxygenized and purified. The flavor of the fruit does not depend upon the character of the sap as carried up from the root, but upon the manner in which the tree breathes; hence the character of the fruit does not follow that upon which it is grafted, but the loaf which the...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Trimming Fruit Trees. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

Trimming Fruit Trees. If you wish to have flavor in fruit, you must hang it outside of the tree. Inside fruit grown in the shade, is sure not to mature. It lacks color; it will lack fragrance and flavor; will be less crisp and juicy. It is less healthy, also. All fruit should be kept on the outside of the tree, and distributed uniformly. It is no excuse to say the orchard is large. What pays in one tree wil pay in a thousand. We may as well have good fruit, all of it, as not. Some trees will do their own thinning, but many will not, and must be attended to if good, fair, and uniform fruit is desired. By thinning and distributing, tlie tree will* be strengthened for future bearing. It will have a good look, with the fruit all visible and all alike, and all good, as good as sun and air can make, and is not so apt in a rainy time to become mouldy. Whenthe top is dense and the circumference close, there should t>e an opening made at an apex, a thinning out of the branches. So...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Eve's Apple Tree. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

Eve's Apple Tree. One of the great botanical curiosities of the Island of Ceylon is "the forbidden fruit " or "Eve's Apple Tree." Its native name is Divri Kaduru. Kaduru, signifying "forbidden," and Diwi "tigers." Its botanical name, Tuber memontura duhotoma. The flowers of this extraordinary production are said to emit a tine cent. The color of the fruit, which hangs from the branches in a very peculiar and striking manner, is very beautiful, being orange on the outside, and a deep crimson within; the fruit itself presenting the appearance of having had a piece bitten out of it. This circumstance, together with the fact of its being deadly poison, led the Mohammedans, on their first discovery of Ceylon—which they assigned as the site of Paradise—to represent it as the forbidden fruit of the Garden ol Eden; for although the finest and most tempting in appearance of any, it had been impressed—such was their idea— with the mark of Eve's having bitten it, to warn men from meddling with...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Requirements of a Successful Farmer [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

Requirements of a Successful Farmer A man must know something about farming before be can become successful. He may desire to become a farmer or gardener; but before he becomes one he has something to learn. We are constantly meeting nun, both old and young, who say they would like to Income farmers. They like fresh milk, butter and eggs, the country air, and fresh strawberries. Oh, yen, they like all these good things, and many of them think they can be had for the asking, no skill being required in their production. "I would like," says another, "to be a doctor or lawyer." Well, do theu become rich without "study? No; nor does any one think of such a "thing. Yet it would be just us foolish to think of becoming a scientific and successful farmer without study, as to become a successful lawyer or doctor. A love for the country is not enough of itself to prepare one for being a farmer. There is no business which requires a more thorough observance or a clearer perception of the laws ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE DAIRY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

THE DAIRY.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Dairy Stock. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

Dairy Stock. The Devons were first imported into England from Denmark.in 1G23. These were of a prevailing yellow color, their descendants being similar in the main characteristics. They were inter-bred, as a general thing, with occasional crosses with the native Briton. Soil, climate, etc., have improved the original type, and at the present day the Dovons, as oxen for draft, have no superiors. The Brittany cow, peculiar to Brittany and adjoining provinces in France, dates back quite as early as the Devon, and has descended through a period of over two centuries, with all its main characteristics preserved. This is the result of close in-and-in breeding tho greatest care being observed in breeding, them only with different families of tho same breed. They are comparatively small, but are good milkers, yielding a good supply of the richest milk, and, as a consequence, good butter and cheese. They are hardy, easily kept, and eat anything fed to them. The Jerseys, though good milkers, ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Our Dairy Products. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

Our Dairy Products. Although the drouth has reduced somewhat the product of butter and cheese, the past year has beeu one of general thrift with our dairymen; the pricew of their produce having been good throughout the entire year—a very high price for a good portion of it. At one time, the long-continued drouth promised to work a grout reduction in the quantity of butter and cheese made, and even threatened serious consequences to the stock; but with the recent moderate amount of rain this danger lias been measurably abated, though not yet wholly averted. With railroad communications with the East, however, prices could in no event touch the extreme figures that have sometimes obtained in this market; where fore there hus been no perceptible advance in prices, though dairy products have been in rather more limited supply than usual at this season of the year. The importations of butter hero amounted to 81,000 rirkins in 1809, to 7,500 last year, and much of this was sold at a loss;...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
AGRICULTURAL NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

AGRICULTURAL NOTES. CALIFORNIA. The Harvest in Progress. The farmers are now getting well into the harvest work. A largo portion of the buy crop has already been cut, and the reapers and headers are busy inevcry direction. There are short crops in many pliK-es; in some the returns will scarcely pay for labor and seed, while in many localities, where in times past we have looked for "our largest returns, there has been an utter failure. On the other hand, in mart of our coast and mountain counties the yield is fully up to, or above the average of previous years. We shall soon be able to take an account of stock, with an approximate degree of COrreotneM, and when the account is taken and the better prices considered, wo shall lind the aggregate value much above what is now generally conceded, and by no means so discouraging as many would have us believe. We are inclined to think that those who first put their wheat at a figure which exporters can accept, will do the best. The news fro...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Mineral and Agricultural Lands. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

Mineral and Agricultural Lands. Mr. J. G. McCallum, Register of the U. S. Land Office at Sacramento, has written a letter with regard to disputes of mineral and agricultural land claimants. The letter, dated May 11th, is, in substance, as follows: In a question between mineral and agricultural claimants as to the character of land applied for by both as between them, the proofs are confined to the land surveyed and applied for as a mining claim, whether a 10-acre tract or less. Where there is no other survey than the usual one returned by the township plat, the proofs are taken as to the smallest legal subdivision; that is, 40 acres when not fractional. If, for instance, in a 40---acre tract, a 10-acre tract is so valuable for mining as to make the whole 40 acres more valuable for mining than for agriculture, the whole is reserved as mineral; if, however, the 30 acres are so valuable for agriculture as to make the whole more valuable for this than for mining, the whole is awarded ag...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Eclipse of 1870. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

The Eclipse of 1870. Of all astronomical phenomena none can compare with a total eclipse of the sun for grandeur and for effect on the mind of man. We know from the history of the ■world what the effect has been on the human race, how it has caused llrst fear and reverence, then wonder and a strong desire to investigate into the reasons and concomitants of so extraordinary an appearance. As each eclipse has oocurred, the scientific world has given to it more and more attention, for the occasion gives opportunity for investigating matters which are, at other times, difficult to examine. Probably no such extensive preparations have ever before been made as were taken for the eclipse last year, and although we have noted the results from time to time, yet a general article on the matter will not be superfluous at the present time. The United States took a prominent part in investigating the phenomena of the total eclipse of Dec. 22d, 1870. This eclipse passed southwesterly over the Atl...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Lotteries vs. Industries. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

Lotteries vs. Industries. In open violation of the constitution of the State, to say nothing of their official oaths, a majority of the last Legislature specially authorized the Mercantile Library Association of San Francisco, to give, not more than three public entertainments or concerts, at which personal property or other valuables might be disposed of by chance, rafflo or scheme of like character, anything in the laws of this State to the contrary notwithstanding. The true object and intent of this Act was to authorize the Association to organize and carry out a scheme of public and open gambling by which they might, under the protection of law, cheat the people out of sufficient money to pay off the debt of the association and pay the incidental expenses of getting up and perfecting and executing the gambling scheme. Subsequent events ha*ve proved that this law has a much wider scope—that in effect it has induced and protects gambling in all portions of the State, ami among all...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
POPULAR LECTURES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 17 June 1871

POPULAR LECTURES.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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