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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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NEW STORIES. Running in "THE WORLD'S NEWS," Including: [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

NEW STORIES. Running in "THE WORLD'S NEWS," BY LEADING AUTHORS, Including: C. J. CUTCLIFFE HYNE, the creator 0f "Captain Kettle." ROBERT BARR, author of the "Mutable Many," and other popular works. JOHN STRANGE WINTER, whose stories are widely read wherever the English language is spoken. HELEN MATHERS, author of "Comin' Thro' the Rye." ALAN ST. AUBYN, who leaped into popu- larity with "A Fellow in Trinity." JOHN K. LEYS, whose serial story, "Fallen Among Thieves," is now appearing in "The Daily Telegraph." Next Week will appear: "EARTH-BOUND," A Mystic Story, By John Strange Winter.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
In the Public Gaze. SANTOS DUMONT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

In the Public Gaze. SANTOS DUMONT. I had the pleasure of meeting Santos Dumont (says a writer in "M.A.P.") the great balloonist, the other day, at a dinner party given in Paris by Mr. Harmsworth. He is the very last man in the world you would take to be the fearless and reckless man who has often faced death in the pursuit of scientific discovery. Rather below the middle height, with a very slight and almost boyish figure; with a boyish face—long, narrow,   with black hair worn down rather low on the forehead, he looks a little like a Brazilian edition of Phil May. And his manner is quietude itself. As he discusses ballooning as you might the weather, you find it almost impossible to realise that you are in the presence of a man whose name and fame have been made immortal; but only by the exposure of his life over and over again to death in a horrible way. From what I heard, I should not be at all sur- prised if some time this year we saw in England a new and daring bal...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
COST OF THE BRITISH CABINET. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

COST OF THE BRITISH CABINET. The annual "wages bill" of the British Cabinet is no light sum—at present it nearly reaches £100,000; or, to be exact, it amounts to £93,550. Of the Cabinet as at present constituted, the best paid is the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland, who re- ceives £20,000 a year; the Lord Chancellor comes next with £10,000, and the Irish Lord Chancellor's salary is £8000. Seven Ministers—respectively stationed at the Foreign, Colonial, War, India, Treasury, and Home Offices, and the Chancellor of the Exchequer—are paid £5000 each, which is the standard salary for a Secretary of State; while the First Lord of the Admiralty has £4550. The remaining eight members of the Cabinet are each given £2000 per annum. The offices of the Irish Chief Secretary and of Postmaster-General are respectively rated at £4425 and £2500.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RULERS AS HORSEMEN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

RULERS AS HORSEMEN. Few of the Sovereigns of Europe are good horsemen. The German Emperor has not what can be called a good seat. The Emperor Nicholas is far from being a master of the art of equita- tion, while the Kings of Sweden, Greece, and Denmark detest riding. The King of Portugal labors under the disadvantage of embonpoint. Prince Ferdinand of Bulgaria cannot ride for an hour at a time, and King Alexander of Servia is afraid of horses. The British Royal Princes are, however, all expert horsemen, but Continental Europe can only boast of two Sovereigns who are really at home in the saddle—the Emperor of Austria and the King of the Belgians.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A VALUABLE FRIEND. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

A VALUABLE FRIEND. One of the best stories now being told about Mr. Yerkes, the American millionaire, who is going to convert the London District Railway into an electric "tube," is that which relates to a most generous act he once performed in the Quaker city. When Mr. Yerkes rose to the zenith of his power and the height of his wealth, one of the first things he did was to pay a visit to Philadelphia, the city wherein previously one of his best friends had met with financial disaster. Mr. Yerkes invited all his old friend's creditors to a magnificent dinner at the leading hotel, and when the repast was over he presented to each guest a cheque for the amount of his original claim, with 6 per cent. compound interest.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ABOUT PINERO. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

ABOUT PINERO. Mr. Arthur W. Pinero, the dramatist, like more than one brother playwright, trifled with the law before finding the cap that fitted him.     His father was a solicitor, who might have left       his son well provided for had he not, in an evil   day, banked with the forger Fauntleroy, who afterwards had a brief morning engagement in front of Newgate Gaol. Pinero's earliest dramatic engagement was at the Theatre Royal, Edin- burgh, that he graduated in the same school as Henry Irving and J. L. Toole. He was one- and-twenty then, and passing rich on a pound a week. Five years later—that is, in 1881—he played with the Bancrofts at the Haymarket. Then he gave himself wholly up to play-writing, in which he was just beginning to find his feet. Now he is one of our wealthiest dramatic authors.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW A MUSICAL COMPOSER WORKS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

HOW A MUSICAL COMPOSER WORKS.   Mr. Frederic H. Cowen, the well-known com-   poser, says, with regard to his method of composi-     tion: "I never work very late into the night now,     though I used to. Every composer should have     a note-book of some sort to jot down ideas in     when necessary. I may say, however, that I     have carried about with me (mentally only) whole     songs or movements perfected sometimes for     three or four years without writing down a note,   and have afterwards used them in almost the exact state in which they were photographed   in my brain! I usually work by fits and starts,   sometimes for months continuously, while at     other times I do little or nothing, lying quite fal- ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MR. CROCKETT AS AN EARLY RISER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

MR. CROCKETT AS AN EARLY RISER.   Mr. Crockett, the well-known novelist, sets an     example of early rising, which few of his brother     writers of fiction would care to follow. He is, in   fact, a very Spartan among authors, for at 4   o'clock every morning this amiable giant tumbles   out of bed and into a cold bath, and his long legs     are striding over the moors by the time 5 is struck,   After a cup of coffee he sits down to his type-     writer, and has clicked out a large number of     words before most people sit down to a 9 o'clock     breakfast. Nearly all his writing in summer is   done in his garden, where he has an ideal study   as well as an observatory.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PARIS UNDERTAKERS' LAMENT. FUNERALS SHOWING A GREAT FALLING OFF. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

PARIS UNDERTAKERS' LAMENT.   FUNERALS SHOWING A GREAT   FALLING OFF.   The last Paris Exhibition has been blamed for   many things, but few people suspected that it   has earned a grudge on the part of the under-   takers (says the Paris correspondent of the "Daily   Mail," on January 7).   Such, however, proves to be the case. A few   days ago I was informed by a member of this   sombre fraternity that 1901 had been one of the   worst years in his line that he could remember,   and official statistics support his statement.   During last year the number of deaths in Paris   was 2500 fewer than the average, and one large   firm of undertakers did £8000 less business than   in 1900, while another showed a decrease in re-   ceipts of £1600.   &nbs...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
POIXTED DIRECTIONS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

POINTED DIRECTIONS. Merritt: "A man shouldn't bother a woman by   talking business."   Cora: "That's right, dear. If you mean busi-   ness, go talk to papa."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A GREAT DETECTIVE. THE HERO OF THE PHOENIX PARK MURDERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

A GREAT DETECTIVE. THE HERO OF THE PHOENIX PARK MURDERS. A brief official announcement on a recent Sat- urday intimated that Mr. William Vesey Harrel had been appointed Assistant-Commissioner of the Dublin Metropolitan Police, in the room of Mr. John Mallon, resigned. That simple communique recalls some of the most interesting chapters in the political history   of Ireland during the last half-century, in which   Mr. Mallon played an exceedingly significant   part.   In the days of the Fenian conspiracy, Mr. Mal-   lon rendered invaluable service to the authori-   ties. He was one of the officers who in 1865   effected the seizure of the "Irish People," the   organ of the Fenian Brotherhood, when the types   and presses were seized, and all on the premises   placed under arrest.   Later on in the same year he secured the arrest  ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FINED FOR EVADING MATRIMONY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

FINED FOR EVADING MATRIMONY. A peculiar custom prevails at Norham, Durham,   that if the banns of marriage be thrice published   and the marriage does not take place, the refusing   party, whether male or female, pays 40s to the   vicar as a penalty for "scorning the Church."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE SPEED OF OCEAN WAVES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

THE SPEED OF OCEAN WAVES. Dr. Vaughan Cornish, F.G.S., recently interest-   ed a large audience at Burlington-gardens on   the subject of "Waves on Water." The meeting   was arranged for young people by the Royal   Geographical Society, and the lecture was pro-   fusely illustrated by lantern-slides and cine-   matographs. The latter were the feature of the   affair, and they included realistic views of the   Atlantic in a storm, the rapids of Niagara, and   the Severn bore. Dr. Cornish dealt chiefly with   the length and speed of ocean waves.   During storms, waves with periods of from   eight to eleven seconds were observed, with   lengths of from 328ft. to 620ft. A ten-second   wave was 512ft. long. Great Atlantic waves   sometimes reached 40ft. or 50ft. in height, but   the ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
INVENTION GONE MAD. PERPETUAL MOTION AGAIN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

INVENTION GONE MAD.   PERPETUAL MOTION AGAIN. Another mortal has, in his own opinion, "over- come the centre of gravity." The inventor of this curious contrivance de- clares that the machine has run 21 days without a stop, and then was persuaded to stand still only by strapping down. Remove the strap and the motion begins again, without a breath to start it. How? Its inventor permits no close examina- tion of his treasure, and only grudgingly con- sented to have its picture taken. This much and this much only is he willing to let the public know in his own words:— "The machine stands 14in. high, brass standard, with an upright post 9in. high, 2in. wide. On one end, with case hardened ball bearings, are two cones, holding twelve 3.32in. steel balls each. The main shaft is 1½in. long, 3.16in. diameter, with four brass tubular arms and two gravity weights connected to each arm. These gravity weights are not at any time at the same point, making a continuous revolution of 6...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AFTER THE FESTIVITIES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

AFTER THE FESTIVITIES.   Brown: "Hullo! What on earth have you been doing to yourself?" Jones: "Fell out of a dogcart going to a meet." Brown: "H'm —; going to a meet, eh? Looks to me more like coming from a drink." —London "Punch."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHAT DROVE HIM. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

WHAT DROVE HIM. Preacher: "When you're tempted to drink, think of your wife at home." Henpeck: "I do—and that's what drives me to drink."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
COMBINATION CARTOON. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

COMBINATION CARTOON. LORD KITCHENER AND GENERAL DE WET.    

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A DUTCH SOUTH AFRICAN TESTIMONIAL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

A DUTCH SOUTH AFRICAN TESTIMONIAL. The "Taegliche Rundschau" would have been better advised to have refrained from publishing aspersions on the British soldier. War always breeds excesses, but the behaviour of Tommy Atkins in South Africa up to the present has not been of a character to incur these terrible charges. Moreover, if such things had really occurred we should have heard all about them from the Boers, and whatever opinions we may have formed of the British Army in South Africa from a military point of view, the English trooper, as an in- dividual, has repeatedly shown that war has not destroyed his better nature. —"Telegraaf," Am-   sterdam.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A BIG BOOT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

A BIG BOOT. The Carnavalet Museum at Paris has just made acquisition of a curious object in the shape of an enormous brodequin, with five soles, weigh- ing at least 6lb. It is a specimen of the cob- blers' art which a cordonnier of the sixteenth century exhibited in his window for advertisement purposes.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WAR WEAR. THE NEW UNIFORMS OF THE BRITISH ARMY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

WAR WEAR. THE NEW UNIFORMS OF THE BRITISH ARMY. The new service dress of drab material for the British regular army and militia may be serviceable for war, but it will be equally as hideous as khaki. It has, however, several advantages. The jacket, with its roll collar and four roomy pockets, is easy fitting. The greatcoat has a short cape, to keep the shoulders dry, and side slits are provided to enable the wearer to get at his jacket pockets. Then its shape and material allow it to be folded up easily, and this to a soldier is a real boon. Leggings are now obsolete; the handy but ungainly-looking puttees take their place. But for the puttees' unsoldier-like appearance, no soldier will regret the permanent change, be- cause in wet weather the legging sadly marked the foot of a pair of trousers. HOW THE REGIMENTS WILL BE DISTINGUISHED. Hitherto the name of the regiment has been indicated   on the shoulder-strap.   Trouser-ends will be tucked tight, close ab...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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