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Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Ch... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 28,405 items from Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Costly chinese Fish. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

Costly chlnoso Fish. Tlio most boautiful and costly tisboa iu the world come from China, and tho rarest and inost expensive of all is tho brush-tail gold fish. Spocimona of these liavo «old for as high as £110 each, and iu Europe tho pricoa rango from 1'50 to £100. Tho brush-tail gold fish is so email that a live-shil ling pieco will cover it, and probably there is no living thing of its size and weight that is worth so much monoy. Tho lisfi lias a body nearly oval in form, with raiubow hues. It is stockily built, und has wonderful broast and tail-fins, which nro as beautifully and dclicatoly formed as lacowork. Its long, drooping brushliko tail is liko silk, aud wliilo at one moment tho littlo fisli throws it round him aa gracefully as the skirt dancor envelopes herself in her fluffy | gown, at tho next it becomes a sharp , and stiff weapon of attack and dofonco. I In some parts of China gold fishes aro held in tlio greatest reverence and awe. In Tai-Ping they aro used as idols, an...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NO DEAL. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

NO DEAL. The Yankee promoter came to town in a special car. He told his admiring friends at the hotel that he had just "pulled off a deal" that had netted him a million dollars. No, he didn't have the actual cash yet, but would have it to-morrow. He had just sold seven hundred thousand acres of land and "fixed himself for life." A week later the promoter was in tercepted while making a quiet "get away" from the hostelry. He was a picture of dejection, but put on a brave front when asked what had gone wrong. "Didn't your deal go through all right?" inquired a sympathiser. "No. I slipped up on two minor technicalities, and that, too, after I thought I had covered every point." "What were the technicalities?" "Well, the fellow who had the land couldn't make a good title, and the man who wanted to buy didn't havi> the money."

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW THE KING'S SPEECHES ARE MADE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

HOW THE KING'S SPEECHES ARE MADE. It ib often asked who really inspires the King's attitude upon current ques tions of the day, and, more particular ly, who writes his speeches? The King takes - the' closest possible Interest in every prominent question of the day. and while ha must, of necessity, take the advice of his responsible Ministers, he has views of his own that he doos not hesitate to pronounce whenever tho occasion calls for it, while his speeches ho "roughs out" entirely by himself. This draft of what his Majesty desires to say is tlion passed on to the officials of the Private Sec retaries' Office, who prepare the speech in set form, and submit it to his Majesty in formal language. This ho goes through most carefully, and it often take two or three re-writings before the King is thoroughly satisfied with it. It may bo said at once, how ever, that no words uttered by the King aro approved until tlioy havo passed hiB most careful scrutiny. It is likewise possiblo to add t...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FACTS AND FANCIES. "Canard." [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

PACTS AND FANCIES. 'Canard." Kvoryouo is familiar with the term "cannrd," used to describe an im probable story. Tho origin ol tho word is older than that of newspapers. In tho sixteenth century tiuiiiu Dutch tishennen brought nows of a marvol lous "canard" or duck, which wub born at tho bottom of tho sua, ap parently out of nothingness. Another version had it that a special kind of tree produced a capsulo, which opened and had a duck inside. Tho naturalists ol' tho period believed in those utoiios, out not so tho public, houco "duck" bccaiuo tho equivalont for a tall story.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
RED MEDICINE MEN. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

RED MEDICINE MEN. Ail tribes «f red mon havo their doctors, or mwlicine men, IjiiL niauy of 1 laoni do not depend upon drugs us curative agents. It is believed that diseaso is some B]>iritual or mental in iluonco upon the physical part of tho patient, and can bo charmed away, Tho medicine mow of tho Apucho In dians divss in boar skins, and carry a rattler, made after tho manner of a tambourine, also a wuiul inado like a spear and loaded down with strips of different coloured skins, or. pur- 1 haps, leaves, and dried poisonous ani mals, liko the lizard. 'l'ho bear-ekln costume is also docked out with tur tles, poisonous reptiles, spiders, birds of pvuy, otc. As a broast-pioeo, tho bat is frequently used. Tho appeuranco of such a doctor is not only enough to frighton tho bad spirit away, but to torrify tho pationt, if ho has not' become familiar with tho demon. Tho Sioux Indians havo a uiodicino man who ohauts about tho sick, crawling upon hands and kneos a portion of tho timo....

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
REMEDY FOB A DRY SKIN. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

REMEDY FOB A DRY SIC1N. Wlion tho skin is constitutionally of a: dry naturo and liable to hecoiiK* rough and irritable at almost i-voi.v change in tho weather, it is generally desirable to apply, at least oneo a tl^y. a good cniolliont preparation. Cold cream of almonds is au oxcelleut speci fic for this purpose. To znako it, mix together four ounces of oil of almonds, half an ounce of white was, hall an ounce of spermaceti. The.sc' hi* Erodionta should bo put in a jar. Set tho jar in a saucepan of water over a slow heat and mix tho ingredients thoroughly togother. When the mix turo is a smooth liquid, stir in two ounces of orange-floivor water; well and store in an oarfchormvare }><'*• Simp)© olivo oil is also an unguent for use on tho skin. Thorc i* no dangor from the uso of vegetal)!* oils. A great many pooplo with aui" rally dry skin use a Uttlo simpto otl after hathing, and for this pwrposo a vegetable oil, liko oil of almonds or olive oil, is to bo preforrod to a...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TO PREVENT CONSTIPATION. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

TO TOEVENT CONSTIPATION. i On© very frequent cause of a fre , quent trouble is the habit of bolting the food without properly masticating it. 13at brown bread, not necessarily of the roughest, huskiest description, which many people much disliko, and I chew evory mouthful before swallowing it. Take fruit, either frosh or cooked, 1 while the dry raisins, figs, and dates are also very useful. Fruit acids, in addition to being laxa tive, stimulate the natural action of the intestines known as peristalsis. Green vegetables should outer into the diet, cither cooked or in the form of salads. Between meals copious draught* of water should be taken, but very little liquid should be drunk with food. The use of water is to keep tlio waste products in a soft state during the passage tlvrough the intestines. Take as much exercise as is possible. Hut all this care as to food and the rest will not avail much unless regularity bo observed in tkxj evacuation of the bowels. As nearly as possible at ...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHEN TO DRINK. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

WHEN TO DRINK. Is i» a good plan to drink a tumbler ful of water between mealB once or twice a day; ono can bo taken on rising in tlio morning if preferred, and a tum blerful of hot water takon nt night ii often very soothing and aids digestion. It is not well to drink much liquid with a meal, as this dilutes the digostive juices. The amounts taken should be roughly as follows: For breakfast, oo« to ono and a half large cups of collet, cocoa, or weak tea; for dinner, a turn blorful of water, lemonade, or other liquid; for tea, two or three teacup fuls of freshly made tea; and for sup por, ono or two tuniblors of milk and soda water, or a largo cup of cocoj. This totals up two and a half pinti of liquid, so at least one tumblerful of water should be takon between moal« to complete the necessary three pints.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
USES OF HONEY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

tISES OF HONEY. Honey is at cnco a ralusbto mcdi. cine and food. Foul air, improper ven. tilation, sudden changes of weather, tho exposure of lungs and throw to a damp atmosphere, are tho source ol no end of throat and bronchial troubles. A free, regular and constant, use rf honey in probably tho bost juedicina for throat troubles. It u a most wiiolosomo substitute for butter, and of more sorvice in cooking than many people imagine. Honoy may replace \BUgar in many ways, oven is an ingredient in the cooking of almost imy article of food. In rice puddings it is preferable to sugar, and tho flavor is much moro delicious. For preserving most kinds of fruit honcv is far pre ferable, as it has tho quality of pre serving for a long time in a fresh state anything tlwt may be required.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
[?]ETTINC HIS OWN BACK. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

CETTINC HIS OWN BACK. Murphy was taking: a day off, and, wishing to enjoy himself thoroughly, and walked round to watcli "the boys" working, lie was surprised to see his friend and colleague Kelly working as if carrying* a hodful of mortar up and down a ladder were the only thing he took a real pleasure in. "It's yourself that's working mighty hard to-day, Kelly!'*' expostulated Murphy. "Whist! I'ni just making a fool of the boss!" safd Kelly, winking slyly. "And how arc you doing that, Kelly?" "Sure, Murphy, it's as easy as kiss ing your hand! lie sees me going up and down the ladder like one o'clock with my hod full of mortar and he thinks I'm working. Kiut, Murphy, my boy, it's the same hodful I'm carting up and down all the time!" Only ho who lives a life of his own can help tho lives of othor men.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Wedding Customs. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

Wedding Customs. | Certain wedding customs are almost | universal among all nations nnd re ligions. It has been hold that the placing of the ring on the bride's linger was a symbol of her submission to her husband. In some instances, however, kings and rulers have hand ed rings to favored subjects us tokens of regard, and as a symbol that they wished those subjects to bo regarded on a social footing equal to their own. The word "wedding" is derived from the Saxon "Woddo," meaning pledge or token, and in olden times at bo trothal ceremonios the future husband gavo his finnceo certain weds or pledges, one of which was invariably a ring, and • this is undoubtedly the origin of the modern engagement-ring. An old Latin writor gives the fol lowing explanation of tho wedding ring:— "Its circular form importoth that mutual love and hearty affection should always exist between tho giver and tho wearer, and oxomplitieth that the loving joys of courtship and matri-. inony should bo for over, t...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Chevy Chase. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

Chevy Chase. The famous old ballad of "Chevy Chase," so dear to the heart of the schoolboy, is founded upon two events which were separated from each other by at least fifty years. One of these the Battle of Otterburn—took place on August 15th, 1388. The border chief tains were constantly engaged in war fare with each other, and a few days previous to this date the Scots, under the Earl of Douglas, crossed into Eng land and ravagpd the country about Carlisle and Northumberland, making many prisoners. On their return they attacked a castle at Otterburn, near the Scottish border, and were over taken on this date by Henry Percy ("Hotspur"), son of the Earl of Nor thumberland, and a desperately fierce battle ensued, in which Earl Douglas was killed and both Percys made pri soners. Fifty years later a private conflict, arising from a hunting dis pute, took place between the sons of the leaders in the former battle. These two fights appear to have been mixed up by the ballad-writers in su...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE BUSY MAN'S ROMANCE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

THE BUSY MAN'S ROMANCE. He was a very busy man, and she was a very pretty girl. She insisted upon having a lovo lettor uvery day. Silo got it. "You writo' tho loveliest letters, dear I" she said. "And tvhon you ara so very, very busy ali the time, I think it is splendid of you to think of me." "I don't forgot you," ho replied. "My secretary has instructions to writo you a lotter for mo to sign every morning. Ho is a most efficient and capablo young man." "And you don't know how I appre ciate the flowors and sweets you send 1110 every day," "Im glud you get them. I told my j secretary to nmko a memo, to send [ you somo overy (Saturday." "How systematic! And it is so thoughtful of you to think of the plays I like best and tho books X prefer." "It's a pleasure to know you are pleased. My secretary gets the tickets and picks out the books. Ho is a very capablo fellow." Two months later the very busy man .said: "Hung him! I don't mind so much his eloping with my fiancee, but how in thund...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE POULTRY RUN. MOULTING POINTS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

^jnTrouLTiiY run. MOULTING I'OlNTb. Keep (U»vn Uu: vermin; don't let the moiiIli»K l'i»1-s 1,av'' "lis 'n:sl co'1 tL.„,| with. Have plenty of dry, looiic earth about lor the birds to dust in— little sulphur mixed with tile dust will l«-'lp 10 lfi" ver"1'"' Spray the ciacks >u tlm roosting sheds' with car bulic, kerosene, hot water, or other distinctive agent. Don't overcrowd the jjioulters; if you do they will take luiw; it "vi:r l'1B ju'J !in^ co»": in to lav I.ito. and wasted time means lust money. I'owl-s moult because Nature diiccts thein to grow a new coat of leathers with which to face the cold of winter; the old feathers are thin allJ worn out, and ineireetive as a cmcring. Strong birds in the moult need no treatment beyond generous feeding, plenty of green stull, and a watertight shed faced away from the prevailing wind. With the heavy breeds it is a wise plan to let the biuudy ones sit for three or four weeks. The spell from laying and tlie stoppage of the machinery gene...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

RE£V3ESV1BER WHEW YOU GET YOU GST HEALTH TOO! A PROFESSIONAL NURSE well known throughout Western Australia, writes her opinion. NURSE ALICE WILKINSON. 21 Hyd. Strut, Nth. Perth, sends this letter: " I have spent many years in my profession as a nurse, both here and in Victoria. I have nursed the sick of all descriptions, and some have been very low and weak. The question always arises in the mind of the nurse what is the best medicine for a patient when thoroughly run down or to keep them from getting low and prostrated. From years of experience and close observation 1 can say I know of no medicine as good as CLEMENTS TONIC as a nerve food and appetising medicine, creating a desire for nourishment. It quickly gives health and strength. {Signed) NURSE WILKINSON." . . or this ttmarfcaWe :ueiici:ie. Where the neivou> system is shattered ihr.-uzh e\hats>tive <tutiie«, fever, waiting iline^. or hraiu fa;, this meci cine juopcrly regenerate- :;erve power. because «t is ri...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE AGE OF BREEDING STOCK. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

THE AGE OF BREEDING STOCK. It is often stated that young fowls invariably make the best breeders. I taku it that the best breeders are those which produce the finest chick ens, and the man who imagines yearlings to be the best for this pur pose is a long way from the mark. You may get chickens earlier in the season from young stock, owing to many old birds being late with the moult; but if you want size and vigour you must pin your faith upon two year-old birds, which, being ripe and thoroughly developed, are better suit ed for breeding purposes than young sters that have barely finished grow ing. I believe that many people lose size and vigour in their strains by breed ing every year from young birds, and I am sure that small eggs may he attributed in some measure to this cause. Poultry-keepers must not, how- I ever, get mixed up with layers and breeders in this connection. I have »ften said that yearlings make the most profitable layers, because they lay the most eggs, but two and...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ABOUT EGGS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

ABOUT EGGS. Wheat contains about 70 per cent, of carbohydrates—that is, fat formers, and 8 per cent, of albuminoids—that is, llcsh or egg formers. A realiza tion of this simple fact will show poul try keepers why it is that hens fed on wheat as the staple food become fat and lay badly. In any case a fat hen will lay badly, but the wheat-fed hen can't lay well, anyhow, because wheat contains such a small quantity of egg forming material. In a nutshell, the lien can't make something out of no thing. The science of feeding con sists in supplying the hen with that variety of food which will maintain the blood, bones, feathers, and flesh, and also provide her with the material out of which to make eggs. Thus, wheat will maintain the flesh, green teed and charcoal will keep the blood pure and healthy, shell grit, stone Krit and bone will keep up the bony structure and the digestive apparatus in order, and insects and meat will supply the protein necessary to keep the feathers in good hear...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AN EFFECTIVE FORCE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

AN EFFECTIVE FORCE. Little Smiblisou was a mock, nervous looking iive-feefc of humanity. His mannor suggested tho probability of his hoarb breaking were he at any time compelled to kill a; ily even though it wore in self-defence. When, therefore, a burglar paid him a visit on© night, he was a bit scared. Tiio nocturnal visitor having boon cap turotl, Smithson had to give evidence at the trial. The prisoner's counsel, a big, bullying sort of chap, evidently thought ho had got an easy job on when the little man entered the wit ness-box. Having described tho ovents prior to tho burglar's capture, Smithson said: "Of course, I got him all right, but I had to use considerable force beforo ho gave in." u0h, indeed I" replied the lawyer, with a sceptical amflo, as ho looked tho litllo man up and down. "And what force was it you used?"—evi dently scouting tho idea that it wao of the physical variety. "Oh," replied Smithson, with a blaud smile, "it was tho police forceI"

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
USEFUL HINTS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

USEFUL HINTS. If you are fattening fowls or ducks, don't forgret that they will do better if kept quiet and shaded from the hot sun. The theory is-—and it is only plain, horse-sense that they must eat •I lui to put on the flesh, and they won't do it if upset, any more than you yourself can eat when you are out of Bear. In hot weather, damp down the shady spots overnight, and the ground will be in good shape for the .birds to <!»«" into next morning. Kerosene and olive oil—equal parts —■will cure scaly leg. Rub well ;n« every other day, for a week. Don't keep a lot of breeds. Spe cialise in one. "Look around you. The 'iien who arc best known are mostly fiuued for one breed In writer's experience the pullets 'hat are bred from a quick, active, second-year cockbird and sprightly seamd-year hens are the best as lay ers. If your hens are not layinjf well •l'ey may be whipped up by (.riviiif? tl'tm cooked lean meat, of which a handy form is the dry meal.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
RANDOM HEADINGS MARRIAGE CUSTOMS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 4 April 1914

RANDOM HEADINGS j M A Kit IA CI 10 CUSTOMS. Many uiarriftfio customs obsorved. m I ho present times aro relicH of tho iiino when women wero .simply tlio ehuttols or slavos of Uioir husbands. Tho wedding-ring is but a substitute for tlio chain or t'oltor,.or perhaps bho metal badgo, of tlio fomalo slavo of tho past. Thon thoro ia Iho custom oP throwing an old shoo. Tn aneiont timon a ruler would signify his dominion ovor «'c pluco by casting his whoo across it, or ovor a sorf by touching tlvo sorf's head with his shoo. Tho casting of a shoo thcroforo signifies tho trans fer of authority ovor tho woman to tho bridegroom. In tho "good old days" a man who wanted a wifo some times wont with a companion to a neighbouring tribo and carriod a girl off by force. It was thon necessary for him to talco a hurried journey to oscapo tlio vengeance of tho pursuing friends of tho girl. S'o to-day tho bridogroom has a comrade in tho shape of his best man, and his honeymoon trip com momoratos tho fli...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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