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Title: Huntingdon Globe Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 74,785 items from Huntingdon Globe, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Id=119 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 30 May 1855

§200 REWARD 'PHE public generally, and the rascals who .i_ somctimesirjce entered my store and i-cmo' - ved valuables to the nrnoont of about SU00 without my permission, uro informed thut I have just opened a more general :tnd bettor assortment of articles in my line of business than was over brought to Huntingdon, con. .^afev ^ 4j£> sisting of Watches, Jcwcl^, ^pSpis^ I^J^k Clocks, Fine Knives, Pistols, fe i-^:| sk^i-ils Perfumery, Port M<mnaies,Sil. Jgg^s^ ver Ware and Fancy Articles, &c, &,e. My old friends and customers, and the public in general throughout tho county are requested to calland examine my assortment. EDM. SNARE . Huntingdon. March 22,1854.

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id=104 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 30 May 1855

AGENTS WANTED, To Sell the Best "Work of T. S. Arthur, "TEN NIGHTS IN A BAR-ROOM, AND WHAT I SAW THERE." HpHIS is a large 12mo., of 240 pages, illustra-JL ted with a beautiful Mezzotint Engraving, by Sartain, bound in the best mannor ; full gilt back. Specimen copies sent to any part of the United States, on receipt of the price75 cts. Some agents now selling- this book, are making 950 per month. Apply to J. W. BRADLEif", Publisher 48 North Fourth Street, April 11,1835. Philadelphia.

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id=121 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 30 May 1855

Come and Be Clothed, At Roman's Store opposite Gouts' 1 Hotel. Frock Coats, Dress Coats, Sack Coats, Business Coats, Pants and Vests, Shirts and Drawers, Handkerchiefs and Cravats , Collars,Gloves, Suspenders, Hats and Caps, &,c.,&c. All of the best materials and most fashionable style and finish—CHKAITR rHAN ELSEWHERE. [Li Call and examine for iiour&elvKs. BANKING HOUSE OF BELL, GARRETTSON & C0.5 On North- West corner of Hill and Mantgonery Streets in the borough of HXJBrTIJKTGDOH', At which a general Banking fausines 19 contemplated to be done. "TYRAFTS on Philadelphia, Pilfsburg, &c., I / &c, always for sale. Collcctio'ns made'ut the principal points in the United States. Money received on deposit, payable on demand without interest;also 3, 6, £)and IS months payable with reasonable rates of interest, thereon. MEMBERS OF FIRM: J. M. Beli ^ R. B..Tohnstons,Wm. Jack,\\ k. M. Lloyd, Hollidaysburg, Ph.; A. P. Wilson, J. Geo. Mil...

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 96 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 30 May 1855

IMPROVED LARD LAMP. TpHE undersigned having purchased the full { and exclusive right and privilege of constructing, using-, and vending toothers, the right to make and use, in the county of Huntingdon, STONESIFER & SMITH'S improvement in the adjustable packing for a lamp for burning Hrd. Lamps for sale by the dozen or single, also township rights for sale at reasonable pri-411 «rdors promptly tended to by addressing the-JuHscriber, Orbisonia, Hunlinffdon county, E.AST ARRIVAL OF SPRING & SUMMER GOODS, CHETNINGHAM & T)TJNN , HAVE just returned from Philadelphia, and arc now opening ulthc old .stand of Josiuh Cunningham &. Son at the head of the Brosd Top basin, a splendid assortment of new Goods, eonsisthijj of- DRY-GOODS GROCERIES, HARDWARE, QUEENSWARE, CEDARWARE , HATS, BOOTS ( / SHOES, Also—BACON, SALT, FISH $ PLASTER And in short everything that is usually kept in a country store. The public are respectfully invited to call and examine our ...

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id=114 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 30 May 1855

yw n C?* 5 B 1 n M F™ ¦ m n rt/m m HPHE subscriber informs the public generally J_ that he has now on hand and for sale, at bis kiln at Pctcr.sburg, superior burned Lime for building, plastering-, &c, &c, which he will sell by the bushel or larger quantity . A good supply will ihvuys be kept on hand. B. ATHERTON. Petersbu-ff, April 17, 1955

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id=115 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 30 May 1855

PLASTER AND CLOVERSEED. r\ ROUND Plaster now read y and for sale.— \J[ Also cloversccd. KESSLER & ERO., March 13, 1855. Mill r.Ycrfr BLANKS! BLINKS!! BLANKS!!! A full assortment for sale at the "Globe " Of fi.ee. Deeds. Summons ', Ex' s, and Thus. Deeds, Executions, Mortgages, - . Subpienas, Bonds, wivh and without waiver, Wa-rr ' aktsLeases Attachments CommittmbntSj Agreements for the sale of Real Estate, Notes relinquishing all benefits of exemption laws.

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 28 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 6 June 1855

From the Waverly Magazine TEARS. BY J. J. WIGGENS "The rose is fairest when 'tis budding new . And hope is brightest when it dawns from fears ; The rose is sweetest washed with morning dew, And love is loveliest when embalmed in tears. " Tears are ihe crystal drops which are the emblems of man ' s weakness, of man's affection, and of man's misery. They, distilled with curious art, by some passion or emotion,of the mind, at last burst the barriers of their receptacle, and pour themselvs forth in one uncontrolable flood. They are the heart's irr.pulsesj which, excited by some thought or external object, and which, unable to find " relief in words, declare themselves by this unuttered language. There Is the tear of the child, who pursues the gaudily colored butterfly over fields and hedges, through brambles and mire, and when at last he reaches the object of his chase, by his. impatient .and unskillful grasp destroys at once its frail beauties and the reward of .his labors; a...

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 5 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 6 June 1855

THE BHOTHS& HUNTERS , POOR TOM'S FATE.- - ' At the foot of the Ozark Mountains, whero the rocky.slqpes extended,far |inio.the cultivated settlements, and at no,great distance from the .bank of the Mulberry, which foamed and roared against the sharp ridges of ice with which the extraordinary severe winter threatened to imprison it, two white huntera walked wrapped in their blankets, along the streamand seemed to be looking for a place , where they could cross to the other, side 1 .-- - ' ¦ • •' . ' - -. ' ' • • • They were two' powerful looking-fellowe, as thisy' talked on with their rifles on ;heir shorilderB, and the elegant fringed leggins, the closely fitting and carefully soleil moccasins showed that'they had'assumed Ihc habits of the woods and not of those "land- hunters " , who especially nV that day..had begun traversing; the western part of the Slate in order.to find out the most favorably situated districts, and purchase, or at least lay claim to them. " ¦ '...

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 32 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 6 June 1855

Marriage. Marriage should' be emblematic of the union of minjl , and heart to heart. It is well to build matrimonial happiness on physical sympathy of heart responding to heart; but the mental adaption , and a similarity of views relative to the grand princi ple of action and events of society, shoiild also be taken into consideration ; for the bodily perfeclion.rnust fadethe ardor of affection may cool or be diverted into another channel, bu: the minds fixity of purpose is more to be de¬ pended upon, its energies diminishing but slowly with.increasing yenrs. A marriage founded upon this mutual understanding has but little chance ,of being wrecked. ~ Both parties finding the self-same mental beauty they once admired , and constantly deriving from each other benefit of mutual interchange of- thought, they hye together as monitors ; their two beings have become insidiously chained by habit, and they really torm but one personality, though having, it is true, a masculine and femini...

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 6 June 1855

From the.FJng- of our Union NIGHT. BV ALBERT O. CLOUOH. O the joy when.night.its mantle Weaves along the silent sky, And the " starry hosts of heaven" Peep from out their homes on high ; When the moon's soft light is lending Newer beauty to the earth, And all nature seems to mirror Forth the peace that hailed its birth-Wnen sotne gentle zephyr b' ringelh Lulling music to the ear, Like some loving.seraph whispering To us from, the'angel sphere.; Then to give the. soul's deep feeling To the, mngic'of the hour, . , And to shrine within our spirit, All its beauty, all its power. " Earth can gi.ve.no higher plcnsure, . None more holy, pure; than this ; For the very "heart seems laden With a calm angelic bliss. i . Give me, tben, the prnce'ful feeling • That belongclh to . this hour . For my spirit then must worship The Creator of iis power.

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 38 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 6 June 1855

DC?" , A fellow at a race course was staggering about the track, with more liquor lhan he could carry. "Hallo ! what 's the matter now?" said a chap whom the inebriated individual had just run against. "Why hie —why," said the fellow, so drnnk he.was Iiardly able to articulate; "the fact is, a lot of my friends have been belting liquor on the race to-dav, and they 've got me to hold the stakes I" . •• ¦ ••" ^~r ~ Let no man be too proud to work,— Let no man be ashamed of a hardjikt or a sunburnt countenance. Let him be ashamed only of ignorance and sloth. Let no man be ashamed of poverty. Let him only be ashamed of idleness and dishones .ty " . When We are Dead.—1. There will be some honest sorrow. A few will be really sad, as we are robed for the grave—fewer, probably, than we now suppoBe. Out of a small circle, how soon we shall be forgotten! A single leaf from a boundless forest fallen! That is all. . [C7* Humility ever dwells with men of noble minds. It is a flower that pr...

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 31 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 6 June 1855

A word for "young X&en. Extract from an address delivered before the graduating class of fiutger 's College, by the Hon. Theodore Frelinghuysen : "Resolve to do something useful, honorable, ihttiful, and do it heartily. Repel the thought that you can, and therefore you may, live above work and without it. Among the most pitiable objects in society is the " man whose mind has not been trained by the discipline of education ; who has learned how to think of the value of his immortal powers, and with all these noble faculties cultiva¬ ted and prepared for an honorable activity, ign.obly sits down to do nothing; with no influence over the public mind; with no interest in the concerns of his country, or even his neighborhood ; to be regarded as a drone , without object or characterwith no hand to lift and no effort to pnt forth to help the right or defeat the wrong. Who can think with any calmness of such a miserable enterprise ? Never permit your influence to go into hostili...

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 33 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 6 June 1855

The Female Mind. The iufluonce of the female mind over the stronger mind of man, is greater, perhaps, than many are willing to acknowledge. Its operations are various, and some men struggle fearfully to disengage themselves from it. But this we believe, that more or less, all men have felt its power; and those perhaps have experienced it to the greatest extent who would have it supposed they despised it most, A woman losea many of her charms, and consequently, much of her power in the opinion of many, when she ranges herself on the side of that which is wrons : while it is impossible to calculate the influence of virtuous womanwhen that influence is exercised with tenderness- and modesty. The ruin produced by a bad woman may be sudden and violent, and compared to the bursting of a volcano, or the overflowings of the ocean ; but the influence of a virtuous woman are like the gentle dew and morning showers, vvhich decent silently.and softly and are known only by their effects in t...

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 18 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 6 June 1855

away rme, Due ne returned in a few moments with a firm and certain step. With his gun in his hand ; he swung himself with his right hand over the scattered trunks, and soon stood agninby the side af.his brother, who looked.affectionately in his face. . • ¦• ¦ "lam.ready ;'? said the latter withnsmile; c£do not tremble.iand God reward you for your kindness.—good-bye ! He offered him his hand as-ha turned his.face away. ¦ - • "Brother !" the tortured , hunter cried, in agony;and he threw himself again on his breast. Once again they held'each other in a cold embrace, till Tom entreated gently,, "do not delay any longer. " With a hasty bound the hunter stood-on bis feet, raised his rifle to his cheek, and layi the next moment unconscious, by the side of the brother he had shot. . : . What more have I to-lell 1 Shall I describe how he awoke and piled branch upon branch on his brothers corpse, so that wolf and panther might not fasten ihsir greedy teeth in the beloved remains—how he t...

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 35 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 6 June 1855

Profits on Poultry. Few farmers expect to realize anything of any amount irom their poultry. Hens are left to take care of themselves , ee a general thing, while sheep and other animals, from which they cannot possibly realize so large a per cent on the cost, occupy the whole of the breeders time and attention. Now let us suppose that a man owns 300 hens, and takes care of them as he ought. He selects six acres of respectable land; makes a good fenoo around it, and divides it in the middle. He puts up a good warm building, 12 feet by 40. In one of' these three acre yards he keeps his hens during the summer , ploughing it once in" two" or three weeks for their benefit. The other yard he plants to corn; the crop being sufficient to keep his hens through the winter. They lay, on ari average , two hundred eggs each per anum, or 6,-000 a year, iu all, which .worth, at a low estimate $600. The hens should be changed from one yard to the other every year.— Doh Newspaper. ¦ ;

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 2 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 6 June 1855

THE &XJNTIN&DON GLOBE, Per annum, in advance, ' JJ31 50 " " . if.riot.paid in advance, 2 00 No paper 1 discontinued until all arrearages are paid. A failure to notify a discontinuance at the expiration of the term subscribed for will be con. sidered a new engagement. Terms of Advertising. 1 ina. 2 ins. 3 ins Six lines or less, 25 37,} ,r >0 1 square,-!6 lines,-brevier, 50 75 " 1 00 2 . " . " 1 00 1 5. 0 2 00 3 " " 1 50 2 25 3 00 ' • ; . 3 m. ,.6m. 12 m. 1 square, " . S3 00' &5 00 $8 00 2 •' " 5 00 8 00 12 00 3 " " 7 50 10 00 15 00 4 " " .9 00 14 00 23 00 5 •". .; , -. " 15 00 .25 00 ' . 38 00 10 " • " 25 00 40 00 60 00 Professional and Business Cards notcxeced. ing'6 lines, one vear, 84 00

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 34 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 6 June 1855

Truth, in. Conversation. The love of truth is the stimubus of all noble conversation. This js the root of all the chanties. The tree which springs from it may have a thousand branches, but thev will all bear a golden and generous fruitage. It is the loftiest impulse to inquire—willing to communicate, and more willing to receive —contemptuous of petty curiosity, but passionate for glorious knowledge. Speech without it is but a babble; rhetoric is more noisy but less pseful than the tinman 's trade. When the love of truth fires up the passions, puts its lightning into the brain, then men may know that a prophet is among them. Ihis is the spiing of all heroism, and clothes the martyr with a flame that outshines the flame that kills him. Compared with this, the emulations of argument, .the pungencies of sarcasm, the ptide of logic, the pomp of declamation, are as the sounds of automata to the Voice of man.

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 37 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 6 June 1855

Anti-Scratch ing Machine.—The Yankes who.invented the "Patent Hen Pursuader" has found his matoh in another who has brought out aa invention called the "Patent Never-Failing Gcivdep. Preserveror Hen Walker." It consists of a small instrument, something like a spur, only considerably longer , which is attached to the hint! part of the hen ' s log, pointing at an angle - of fortj'-fiva degrees toward the ground. When the hen wilh this instrument on her legs enters th& garden in the spring after seeds , she puts her foot foiward to scratch, the "walker " catches in the ground and forces her forward ; and thus she is walked, in her efforts To'scratch entirely out of the garden:. The Oswego Palladium says an agency, has ; been opened in Oswego for the sale ol these machines. It must be "hard scratching " about Oswego , even for hens without fetters.

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 36 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 6 June 1855

Ax Osedjest Child.—No object is more pleasing, than a meek and obedient child.— He reflects honor upon his parents , for their wise management. He enjoys much ease and pleasure to the utmost limit of what is fit'. He promises excellency and usefulness ; to be, when age has matured tlie understanding, a willing subject in all things to ihe government of God. No object , on the contrary, is more-shocking than a child under no management. We pity orphans, who ' nave neither father or mother to care for them. A child indulged is more to be pitied ; it has no parents-it is its own master—peevish, forward, headstrong, blind; born to a double portion of trouble and sorrow , above what fallen man is heir to : not only miserable himself , but worthless ; and a plagua to all who in-future will be connected with him.

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Id= 22 : [Newspaper Article] — Huntingdon Globe — 6 June 1855

Dobbs in the Legislature. Owing to a new phase .in politics, Dobbs was elected to the Legislature. Though gratified, " he . was also nJittle intimidated by the honorand but for the thought that he was not necessarily obliged to speak, would have declined serving.' As it was, he accepted. ' . ' ~ ' All things went on smoothly for a time. Mr. Dobbs could vote on "other'people ' s motions though he could'rit .make any himself. One unlucky day, however,' the proceedings being'rather ' dujl, and Mr. Dobbs rather thirsty, he eoncluded to go down to Coverley's * and get.a g)ass of lemonade. As he rose to leave the hall, he caught the Speaker's eye. The Speaker supposed he intended to address the House, and accordingly announced in a loud voice—''Mr! Dobbs." Dobbs

Publication Title: Huntingdon Globe
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
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