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Elephind.com contains 12,833 items from Waynesburg Messenger, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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The Panic at Jfaahville. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 March 1862

The Panic at Jfaahville. ST. LOUIS , February 24.—The Nashville papers advise undermining some of the bluffs on the Cumberland j and blowing them into the river on the approach of our gunboats, either j to destroy them or obstruct the chan- j nel. —?•¦ i

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Slave Pirate Gordon Executed—Bumside Eeinforoed. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 March 1862

Slave Pirate Gordon Executed—Bumside Eeinforoed. NEW YORK, Feb. 21 — .Nathaniel Gordon, the convicted slaver, was ex- • ecuted at noon in the Tombs. He made no speech. The unfortunate ' man attempted to commit suicide , last night by, smoking cigars which . were saturated with, strychnine. , The Postal this evening says; j Reinforcements havebnen sent to j Gen. Burned*, whieh will increase ! his force to 40,000. • j

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Flags Presenied-Eebeh? Concentrating at Krirfreesboro. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 March 1862

Flags Presenied-Eebeh? Concentrating at Krirfreesboro. LOUISVILLE, .Feb. 25.—The Ninth i Ohio and Second Minnesota this afternoon received two splendid flags from the loyal ladies of Louisville, in commemoration of their victory at Mill Spring, January 19th. Considerable enthusiasm attended the presentation. A deserter from the rebel army arrived at Munfordsville today. He reports the national flag flying over Nashville, and that the rebels pretend to be concentrating 200,000 men at Murfreesboro, intending to give battle there.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
lien Price Still Estreating--Leaves His Siok and Wounded. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 March 1862

lien Price Still Estreating--Leaves His Siok and Wounded. ox. iiotJis, Jreo. zo.— . naaecK this morning telegraphed to Gen. Mc-Clellan as follows: Priee: s army has been driven from his strong post at Cross Hollow. The enemy left his sick and wounded and such stores as he could not destroy. He burned the extensive barracks of that place to prevent our troops occupying them. Gen. Curtis says that most of our provisions fcr ta* fest tea days hare been *#k*»***m tbe mmy.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Commodore Foote's Proclamation. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 March 1862

Commodore Foote's Proclamation. CAIRO, Feb. 22.—Everything is quiet at Fort Donelson. The rebels, before evacuating Clarksville, fired the Railroad bridge, crossing the Cumberland at that point. Commodore Foote issued the following proclamation: To the inhabitants of Clarksville:— At the suggestion of the Hon. Cave Johnson, Judge Winslow, and the Mayor of your city, who called upon me yesterday, after Otir.hoisting the Union flag, to' ascertain my views and intentions towards the citizens and private property, I hereby an nounce to all peaceably disposed persons that neither their persons nor property shall suffer molestation by me, or the naval forces under my command, and they may safely resume their business avocations, with assurance of my protection. At the same time, 1 require all military stores and army equipments shall be surrendered, no part of them being withheld or destroyed; and further, that no secession flag or manifestation of secession feelingsball be exhibi...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
"+ • «-»-*¦¦- the Death of Willie Lincoln. l/ [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 March 1862

"+ • «-»-*¦¦- the Death of Willie Lincoln. l/ The deceased son of President Lincoln, says the Washington Star, was a boy of unusual intelligence, and was a favorite with all who visited the White House. Some weeks since he was taken sick with an intermittent fever, which soon assumed a typhoid character, and since that time he has been gradually sinking. Much of the time his mind has been wandering. His condition has been very critical for more than a week, and last Monday his case was considered almost hopeless. Since Wednesday he has sunk rapidly, and Thursday it was seen than he was dying, but he lingered until five o'clock in the afternoon, when his spirit was released. Drs. Stone and Hall have attended the deceased and his younger brother since their illness. He was a fine looking boy, and his intelligence and vivacity made him a favorite with old and young. He was a faithful attendant of Sabbath school, and the last day he was present there told his tutor that when he ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Rebel* Tin* Fighting Against the Old flag. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 March 1862

Rebel* Tin* Fighting Against the Old flag. ST, Loins, Feb. 21.—Special dispatches from Cairo to the Republican and Democrat, say that on Tuesday two rebel regiments from*Clarksville, came to Donelson and gave themselves up, saying that they had been deceived and were tired fighting against the old flag. It is declared that strong objections will be raised by the Tennesseeans against the Bowling Green force offering battle at Nashville. The Provost Marshal at Clarksville sent word to General Grant to eoihe up and occupy the town at once. The officers of the gun boats now lying there represent the Union feeling as very strong.— The people of the State had been made to believe that the Union army was entirely composed of Germans and Negroes for Abolition purposes, but they now see that it is not.— They are now anxious to return to their allegiance. Prominent citizens say that a similar feeling would pervade the whole State in a week. Governor Harris has called a meeting of the ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
A Letter from the Secretary of War. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 March 1862

A Letter from the Secretary of War. To the Editor of the N. 1. Tribune : SIR: I cannot suffer undue merit ^to be ascribed to my official action. The glory of 6ur recent victories belongs to .the gallant officers and soldiers that fought the battles. No share of it belongs to me. Much has been said of military combinations and organizing victory. I hear such phrases with apprehension. They commenced in infidel France with the Italian campaign, and resulted in Waterloo. Who can organize victory? We owe our recent victories to the spirit of the Lord, that moved our soldiers to rush into battle, and filled the hearts of our enemies with terror and dismay.— The inspiration that conquered in battle was in the hearts of the soldiers and from on high, and wherever there is the same inspiration there will be the same results. Patriotic spirit, with resolute courage in officers and men, is a military combination that never failed. We may well rejoice at the recent victories, for they ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Bentonville, Arkansas, Taken. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 March 1862

Bentonville, Arkansas, Taken. ST. LOUIS , 21.—General Halteck to-day telegraphed to General 3|c-Clellaa that General Cartiaha* tfe, ken BaatsMilt* , A^fcapav wfefc; * , conBidenajHr fin itjr «f bajgtfiV etc. > , i

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
— .v. From Missouri. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 March 1862

— .v. From Missouri. ST. Lours, Feb. 20.—Gen. Halleck has sent the following dispatch to Gen. McClellan. "Clarksville is taken, with supplies enough for our army twenty days.— The place is now occupied by Gen. Smith's division. "Gen. Price being reinforced by McCulloch's command, made a stand at Sugar Creek Crossing, Arkansas, on the 19th, but was defeated, after a short engagement and again fled. Many prisoners were taken, and a quantity of arms, which his men threw away in their flight." Nearly all the Fort Donelson pris- oners reached here and are being rapidly forwarded to their destination. General Buckner is expected to-night. It is understood that the officers will be sent to Columbuu, Ohio. A Union scout who was in Columbus on Tuesday night reports that no preparations are being made for the evacuation of that place. Fourteen steamers, with steam up, were at the wharf, and a salute was fired, indicating the arrival of a General and reinforcements from the South. The ce...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Ool. Annisansel in Disgrace. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 March 1862

Ool. Annisansel in Disgrace. I j i j j j J ' i S ; !! it seems tnat ool. Annisansel ot the 1st Virginia Cavalry, has turned out to be a coward, and actually disgraced himself and the Union arms at the fight at Bloomery the other day. Gen. Lander reported the fact to Washington, and the Secretary of War sent the following bulletin in reply: WASHINGTON, Feb, ID, 1862. Complaint having been made by Gen. Lander ofthe misconduct of an officer under his command, and the matter referred to the Secretary of War, the following instructions were given :— If Gen. Lander is satisfied that Col. Annisansel was guilty of cowardice or misbehaviour before the : enemy, he may be tried on the spot, I and if found guilty, the sentence of j death may be executed on the spot, j or he may be cashiered by the com-: manding General at the head of his i regiment. The former course is j recommended as the preferable one. j Cowardice in an officer, exhibited on j field of battle, should receive the , swi...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Latest From North Carolina--Gen. Bumside's Movements. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 March 1862

Latest From North Carolina--Gen. Bumside's Movements. FORTRESS MONROE , February 25.— The steamer Baltimore, whieh left here several days since with ammunition for the Burnside expedition, returned from Hatteras about noon today, having left yesterday afternoon. The news is not of special interest. The burning of Winton , North Carolina, is confirmed. The Ninth New York regiment had made an expedition up the Chowan river with three gunboats, but having found the enemy in full force, returned without making an attack. Among the passengers by the Baltimore is Charles Henry Foster, who was yesterday reported killed by the rebel papers, at Winton. The election ordered by the Provisional Government of North Carolina to take place on Saturday, resulted in the re-electioii of Mr. Foster.— The ordinances of the convention were also ratified. The object of the expedition ofthe Ninth New York regiment was to destroy the Railroad bridges on Black water and Chowan rivers. The enemy was ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
-.- ^ ^W^^^^^^^M Gen. Basil's Arm? in Baahville. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 March 1862

-.- ^ ^W^^^^^^^M Gen. Basil's Arm? in Baahville. There can be no doubt that Nashville is now in our possession. The details of the matter have evidently been kept back, as well as the news of other Important and mysterious movements now taking place in the West. Our troops are said to have taken possession without opposition. Floyd fled as usual. The report that Gov. Harris has ordered the Tennessee troops to lay down their arms, is also confirmed. The Tennessee Legislature is called far next Monday. No opposition to the j Union movement is made anywhere I on the Cumberland. It is reported i that white flags were flying at Mem- i phis. j Two old citizens of St. Louis, who i left Memphis on Tuesday last, have I arrived at the former place. The j report that the day they left Mem- j phis, the Legislature arrived there from Nashville. They were to meet on the following day to discuss the present state of affairs in that State. People were rapidly arriving from Nashville and in ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The Death of Miss McLean. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 March 1862

The Death of Miss McLean. The shocking death of Miss Mary McLean, on the Pennsylvania Railroad, on Friday last, has already been briefly noticed by us. The Greensburg Democrat gives the following account: "From the evidence produced before the Inquest it appears that the deceased and two other girls, named Rodebaugb, was on their way to a singing school, at Ludwick, and that, when a short distance this side of the Tunnel, they heard the approach ofthe Express train bound east, and a freight train bound west. One of the Rodebaugb girls called the attention ofthe others to the fact that a train was approaching them from each direction, and remarked that they had better leave the road. Deceased replied that the freight train would pass them before the Express came up, and that then they could get on the other track in time to avoid the Express; but just as the freight was passing them at the short curve on this side ofthe Tunnel, the Express came thundering down upon them, and ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Rejected Army Clothing. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 March 1862

Rejected Army Clothing. I he military board of inspectors appointed by the General-in-Chief are engaged in examining the supplies recently received at the clothing depot, at Washington, from Philadelphia and New York. The result of their first day's labor was to condemn 25.000 infantry privates' coats, which articles cost the Government $167,750. From all appearances the board will continue in session for a ^long time. It is found necessary to order the erection of a huge shed for the purpose of storing rejected clothing. In order to protect the Government from thus being swindled by wholesale, and the better to secure the health and comfort of the army, efforts are making to organize a bureau to furnish the troops with clothing, camp and garrison equippage, and to be established similar to the other bureaus of the War Department, though separate and distinct from them all.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
i Gen. Scott Going to Mexico, [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 March 1862

i Gen. Scott Going to Mexico, Washington's birthday, says a Tribune dispatch, was chosen for the nomination to the Senate of Gen. Winfield Scott as Minister Extraordinary to Mexico, with, as is said, functions such as he exercised in the pacification of the North-eastern Boundary Question. Accompanying this nomination, the project of a treaty went into the Senate, whose principal feature was substantially the assumption of the Mexican debt due to England, France and Spain. The interest on this amounts to three millions a year. The treaty guarantees the payment of it for five years. There is no law for the appointment of an Assistant Minister to Mexico, or any other country. As Commissioner, Gen. Scott's nomination would be confirmed by the Senate, particularly if his functions should be limited to the pacification of the armed quarrel conspired against Mexico at a momffnt when we could not defend the Monroe doctrine and go to her help. Hut it is very doubtful if the Senate wil...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Wouldn't Be Left Behind. I [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 March 1862

Wouldn't Be Left Behind. I When the Donelson prisoners were en route for Chicago, the cars stopped at one of the stations, and two of the Confederates, in charge of Captain S. G. Ward, were allowed to ' leave the cars to obtain water. By j an oversight the train departed before their return. The cars had just got under headway, however, when j the two soldiers were seen upon the ' track, at double quick, waiving their j hats and shouting for the train to be stopped. They had no intention to Deleft behind, and after a few mo-j ments the speed was slackened and S they climb«d aboard, puffing and | blowing from their exertions. I ¦II i

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
| Hashville Occupied by Gen. Buefl. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 March 1862

| Hashville Occupied by Gen. Buefl. ST. LOTJIB, Feb. 34.—A special dispatch from Cairo to the Democrat says that the latest intelligence from the Cumberland is, that General Buell's ! forces occupy Nashville; that Gov' ernor Hams has called in all the j Tanneam troops, and that . a strong reaction has occurred among tbo 'people.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
(knars! Lander's Stirring Words. I [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 March 1862

(knars! Lander's Stirring Words. I There's something magical about the words of a true soldier, the world over.— ! The other day, at the battle of Bloomery ! Gap, Samuel F. Bigger, of Belmont coun- j ty, Ohio, member of Captain Carman's I l»t Virginia Cavalry, was killed, while i gallantly charging the enemy ia the front I ranks of hia company. Gen. Lander, on j hearing of hia death, issued the following order, full of nobleness and heroism : ! DIVISION HEADQUARTERS , ) ! CAMV CHASE, PAW PAW) VA. J j Special Orders, No. 57.] i Mr. Samuel F. Bigger, a private of! Capt. Carman's company D, First "Vir- j ginia Cavalry having been killed whilst; gallantly assisting his Captain to capture j the baggage of the enemy, will be escorted j to his former residence, and his body delivered to his family with the compliments of the commanding General. His last words were, "Iam hilled! Don't mind me, but go en." Capt. Carman will detail two true soldiers and brave men who were with him in th...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
LATEST MAEKET EEP0BT8. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 March 1862

LATEST MAEKET EEP0BT8. FmiiABELPiiiA, heb. 28.—Flour dull; sales 2,000' bbls. at $5 75 for extra and §f> 00 for extra family. Rye flour steady at S3 25 a&d corn meal at §3 00. Wheat firrAsales 10,000 bush, at SI 33@1 35 for red and 1 39@1 43 for white. Sales 2,000 bush, rye at Vic. Corn steady at $5@5G for new yellow. Sales 10,000 bush. Penna. oats at 39e. and Del. at 87e. Provisions firm ; sales mess pork at §13 50@14 00. Coffee firm; small sales of Bio at 18i@21c. and Laguyra at 22c. Sugar and molasses dull. NEW YORK, Feb. 28.—Flour firnj; sales 7,000 bbls. Wheat declining.— Corn heavy; sales 25,000 bush, at 62@64e. for mixed. Beef and pork firm. Lard steady. 1 «i i

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
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