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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

98 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 4- - "! 5C A Bit of Church History Repeating Itself. X " I mmmmr N Charles Warren Stoddard's graphic delineation of old days in El Dorado (In the Footprints of the Padres 1902), we find these words anent the foundation, in the eighteenth century, of the Spanish Missions in California and their destruc tion some sixty years ago, which take on a pe culiar significance in the light of recent national events: "The Franciscans founded their first mission in California at San Diego in 1769. The Mis sion Dolores was founded on St. Francis' Day, 1776. To found a mission was a serious matter; yet one and twenty missions were in the full tide of success before the good work was abandoned. The friars were the first fathers of the land: they did whatever was done for it and for the people who originally inhabited it. They explored the country lying be tween the coast range and the sea. They set apart large tracts of land for cultivation and for the pasturing of flocks an...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 99 There were no hotels in the California of that day, but the traveler, the prospector, the speculator, was ever welcome at the mission board; and it was a bountiful board until the ra pacity of the Federal Government laid it waste. "Alexander Forbes in his 'History of Upper and Lower California' (London, 1839) states that the population of Up per California in 1831 was a little over 23,000; of these, 18, 683 were Indians. It was for the conversion of these Indians that the missions were first established; for the bettering of their condition mental, moral and physical that they were trained in the useful and industrial arts. That the missions labored not in vain is evident. In less than fifty years from the day of its foundation that is in 1825 the mission of San Francisco Dolores is said to have possessed 76,000 head of cattle; 950 tame horses; 2,000 breeding mares; 84 stud of choice breed; 820 mules; 79,000 sheep; 2,000 hogs; 456 yoke of working oxen; 18,000...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

IOO CHURCH HISTORY REPEATING ITSELF. manumitted; portions of land were allotted to them, and the whole country was divided into parishes, under the superin tendence of curates. The zealous missionaries were no longer to receive a salary four hundred dollars a year had formerly been paid them out of the national exchequer for de veloping the resources of the State. Everybody and every thing was now supposed to be self-sustaining, and was left to take care of itself. It was a dream and a bad one! "Within one year the Indians went to the dogs. They were cheated out of their small possessions and were driven to beggary or plunder. The Fathers were implored to take charge again of their helpless flock. Meanwhile the Pious Fund of California had run dry, as its revenues had been di verted into alien channels. The good friars resumed their of fices. Once more the missions were prosperous, but for a time only. It was the beginning of the end. Year after year acts were passed in the Mexican ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 101 the masses whoever they might be. The general govern ment had long been in financial distress, and had often bor rowed to put it mildly from the friars in their more pros perous days. In 1831, the Mexican Congress owed the mis sions of California 450,000 of borrowed money; and in 1845 it left those missionaries absolutely penniless. "Let me not harp longer upon this theme, but end with a quotation from the pages of a non-Catholic historian. Re ferring to the Franciscans and their mission work on the Pa cific coast, Josiah Joyce, assistant professor of philosophy in Harvard College, says: " 'No one can question their motives, nor may one doubt that their intentions were not only formerly pious but truly humane. For the more fatal diseases that so-called civiliza tion introduced among the Indians, only the soldiers and col onists of the presidios and pueblos were to blame; and the Fathers, well knowing the evil results of a mixed population, did their best to ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

102 CHURCH HISTORY REPEATING ITSELF. Catholic Americans towards the friars of the Philippines, an unprejudiced observer cannot fail to detect a notable paral lel to the conditions which led to the secularization of the Spanish missions of California in the last century. Enemies of the friars in both instances seem to have ignored the fact that those good religions were (as Mr. Stoddard remarks) "the founders and rightful owners of the missions the first fathers of the land;" that "they did whatever was done for it, and for the people who originally inhabited it." It is indisputable that they were the first explores, the first tillers of the soil, the first cattle-raisers, the first educators of the natives in all branches of secular as well as religious knowledge. In both cases, from the time officious outsiders began to interfere in the affairs of the friars, the prosperity of their people began to diminish faith and morals to languish and decay. Even as the Mexican soldiers and co...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 103 labors at a meeting of the Brotherhood. The substance of his address (as the present writer can witness) was published at the time in the Philadelphia daily papers. In it he de clared that the Philipinos were one of the most moral and re ligious of peoples; that, whereas prior to the war with the United States, saloons in Luzon (if the Philippine wineshop or restaurant could be truthfully classed in the same category with the American saloon) were few and far between, after the occupation of that city by our soldiery, the number of taverns increased to hundreds. In short, this fair-minded Protestant gentleman implied that non-Catholic evangelists to that portion of "our new possessions" were not needed there, for the people had been already thoroughly instructed in Christian doctrine and were proficient in its practice. Fur ther, that the advent of Americans in Manila had wrougth a grievous change for the worse in Philippine morals, signally degrading, inste...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

io4 CHURCH HISTORY REPEATING ITSELF. spread of drunkenness and immorality after the occupation of Manila by the American army were vigorously assailed. Is there now any one who has the audacity to question their truth? Since then, we have all heard of the 'water cure,' and the murderous orders issued by an American general. The perpetration of these outrages was unknown for a time; they were, however, so flagrant that it was impossible to keep them from the knowledge of the public. The introduction alone of the public-school system was just cause for alarm." Again: "The impression has gone abroad that America is furn ishing educational facilities to the Filipinos for the first time, and that the people were in a state of dense ignorance. This is another calumny. The Filipinos were not civilized and Christianized as we have civilized and Christianized the In dians of America, by rifle bullets which consigned them to quiet habitations beneath the sod. During centuries the friars dwelt...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 105 from their field of labor, were recalled when pestilence and death stared the wretched sinners in the face. The Father General of the Augustinian Order, Most Rev. Thomas Rod riguez, himself a Spaniard, is credited with having said in August, 1902: "The truth is that the friars are not hated by a majority of the Filipinos (as has been so often declared by a subsidized press) but only by that' faction which wanted to get rid of them in order to be left without curb or law. This I verified myself when, in 1896, I visited the islands from end to end; and I have had confirmation of this statement in recent re ports, which say that friars have been called again to parishes outside of Manila which they left after the revolution of 1898, this being partially due to their excellent work in the present cholera scourge. The result is that the Augustinians now again occupy ten places outside of Manila. They would easily be able to return to all the abandoned interior di...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

106 CHURCH HISTORY REPEATING ITSELF. spots they have consecrated for ages by their self-sacrificing toil and prayer; from the soil they have enriched by their sweat, their tears, and their blood. Sacrilegious hands may level the convent-belrfy to the dust, and pluck out the metal tongue that has long and lovingly invited the favored abo rigine to the true worship of his God, yet the music of the ancient mission-bell will ever continue to echo through the corridors of romantic history, bearing melodious witness against the vandals who conspired to rob a happy people of that angel summoner to the blessed realms of prayer and peace. Ruthless bigots or crafty diplomats may succeed in de molishing or purloining theantique mission-houses and schools; but the picturesque phantoms of the old-time Padres and their gentle neophytes will never cease to flit through their primi tive haunts, wliispering constantly to all godless intruders the names of the patrons of their shadowy shrine titles a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 107 5 5 A King in This West. 3 C mammmat DT lnnor aorn tVioro naccorl fhp locf rViiff rf n rrrnnt 11 i line of hereditary Osage nobles, and none was more celebrated in all his princely house. Not a soldier or leader of fighters not once in his long life did he raise tomahawk against man, woman or babe only distinguished in peace, and for that reason more worthy of remembrance than many who have legibly written their names in blood. So far back as Osage tradition travels, a son of the house of Saucy Chief has been chief of the great Osages, and as great is to little, so is the great Osage band to all other bands of Osages. There are many Osage bands, and once they were numerically strong but when the Nation numbered 12,000 or 15,000 this American dukedom included more than half of the whole population. So, you see, this hereditary lordship was something in the way of power and pomp and circumstance. At that time, furthermore, the Osages owned about all of Missour...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

io8 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. place. He was a chief nearly fifty years, and remembered nearly seventy. When he was a boy the French trappers and traders came up from St. Louis to stay much of the time and start well the race of Osage mixed bloods. When he was a young man he stopped often in and about a small, lonesome landing place, village of shacks and cabins, called Kansas City in later days, where mixed bloods were now congregat ing to be in touch by steamboat with civilization of what seems today indeed a dim sort, the full-bloods still clinging naturally to the Osage river and its Kansas tributaries. . When he was a young chief he came with the first exodus out of Missouri forever, into Kansas temporarly. They were cutting down the kingdom, these white people; pushing, ever pushing all together and persistently from the Fast. Now, in the 50s, the Nation was fenced in by the bound aries of a reservation small state or province of a once ex tensive dominion, and yet larger than Engla...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

A KING IN THIS WEST. 109 Osage excursions, then, were largely after buffalo. Tur key, deer and fish were in large abundance over the eastern half of their dominion. When their home was in Missouri, Saucy Chief had hunted buffalo in Central Kansas and the Cherokee outlet. Those were long and splendid journeys, in the fall of the year, 300 miles afoot across the kingdom and back again the prince with his retinue of strong yc ng hunt ers. He must have been a tireless leader, since he was big and active, 6 feet 2 in moccasins, lithe, with no superfluous flesh, yet weighing well onto 200 pounds in his best days, eagle-eyed and eagle-beaked, firm lipped and proud imperi ous every inch a leader and a lord. Only the best could stay with him and these were proud of the distinction. He would sometimes talk of these days of Western Missouri, a wilderness of forest and prairie, big streams and mighty trees growing rank in wide bottoms; of Kansas City, straggling, unpainted, ragged, weather-beat...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

no THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. But in decidedly clear and primitively simple way his brain kept pace with it all. He alone of all the chiefs looked ahead. Had not his own life been kaleidoscopic in epochs? There would be other epochs and still others, each one show ing the Indian farther away from what had been. Yes, even the ground would be pushed out from under him if he stood still. The first agent and the last and present one found him a friend to the white man's theories and plans concerning this great Indian question. He was for boarding schools when it seemed cruel tyranny to take 6 and 7-year-old babes out of their protesting mothers' arms, to take up their abode in modern dormitories for nine months of the year. "It is better for our children," said Saucy Chief. "White people ought to know." He was for industrial schools which took away from the reservation for years the proudest and fairest of the boys and girls. Some came back grown and good to look at, but their fathers and mot...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

A-KING IN THIS WEST. ' in to us when they were poor and we pitied them and we adopted them; now, because we are grown rich we will not turn them out." "We are settled in this country and doing well," he said at another time. "Now we are butting our heads together and I do not like it at all." Again in relation to this same quesiion: "The mixed-blood children are brighter than ours and learn quicker. It is best for us that they should all be in one school together; that helps our children. Then when they are grown they can all be of advantage to each other." You take notice that he was an optomist, and why not? Clear headed and just, much honor had been thrust upon him hereditary overlord of the Great Osages, first noble of the council, prime minister to his excellency, absolute, United States Indian agent, friend and mediator for the race of mixed bloods, beloved of all parties, white or red. Much of his wisdom came through sorrow. None of his sons survived him. Only one daughter ou...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

112 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. and hearse, and heathen panoply of shroud, of modern ser mon and bursts of primeval dirge. But it must have pleased the old prince from that other side. When he was dying his old wife promised to mourn for him all her days. Summer and winter, naked of feet and shoulders, with dried clay upon her head, she would remem1 ber. At the last pony-smoke we heard her mourning, voicing that fearful Osage dirge, which begings at the top of grief and sinks gradually into the very dregs of despair out, away from the big circle: "A year ago he was there; he presented the pipe; he gave ponies; he smoked and received; last of giving and receiving; he, the greatest and wisest; he, the best beloved; he, the one Chief Saucy Chief Ki-he-hah-wah-ti-an-kah; mourn for him; mourn for him; mourn for him, they that have forgotten him. They shall not look npon his like again." Henry Walker. (D (3D (2D Wj Wj vSfa Higher Authority. An Irishman, about whom the Detroit Free Press tells, h...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

113 --- THE INDIAN ADVOCATE i THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. a it Published by the Benedictine Fathers of ' J$ . tX SACRED HEART MISSION. OKLAHOMA. t u . ................ t -- A Monthly Review Under the Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary, St. Michael and St. Benedict. Approved by our Regular Superiors. TRHMH OF SDnSCIIIPTIOMl Single Copies 15c. Annual , Si. 00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. . 75c. Foreign Si. 25. Entered as Second-class Matter at Sacred Heart, Oklahoma. PRIVIIiISQKHl 1. Eery Subscriber and Benefactor will participate in all the merits, prayers and good works of the Religious of Sacred Heart Abbey. 2. A solemn High Mass is sung every First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors. 3. A Conentual Mass is offered every First Saturday of the month for our departed Friends, Subscribers and Benefactors. 4. Every year, in the month of September, two Solemn Masses are sung for our Bene f...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

H4 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. The Sovereign Pontiff has just selected the forty Consul tors from various nations, who are to assist the Commission of Cardinals for Biblical studies. There are 13 Germans, 11 Italians, 9 Frenchmen, 2 Belgians, 1 each from the United States, England, Ireland, Holland and Spain. Fifteen of the Consultors are members of xeligious bodies: 4 Dominicans, 4 Jesuits, 2 Benedictines, 2 Sulpitians, 1 Augustinian and 1 Oratorian. The Secretaries are Father Fleming, Vicar Gen eral of the Friars Minor and the Rev. Fr. Vigouroux. Nine of the Consultors reside in Rome. t Ik Combes, and company, drive out the Benedictine Fathers from their College at Douai (France) they will have to answer for it to their sober-minded neighbors. The Ben edictines teach only their own countrymen young English men, students for the priesthood. For this purpose English Catholics have recently given large sums of money. Besides, a large sum of money, paid to England for French confiisca tion o...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

AN APPEAL FOR INDIAN SCHOOLS. "5 American Federation of Catholic Societies, we do so in the interest of an object so dear to the faith of every Catholic, a cause so imperative to the successful mission of Holy Church, that we feel confident it will evoke a responsive, even an en thusiastic echo in every Catholic heart. It is needless to state that the last three years have been precarious ones in the history of our Catholic Indian schools and missions. The repeated appeals of our Bishops and Archbishops, the pa thetic pleadings of our missionaries in pulpit and press, through private and official channels to sustain the work, are so well known that further explanation is needless. At one time a crisis, which at no period "of the Catholic Church's history in the United States ever seemed possible, even as a remote contingency, almost became a humiliating fact. A crisis that involved not the mere impairment, but threatened abandonment of the missionary and educational work, begun four...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

1 16 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. save the jeopardized souls of our Indians. Shall we allow the repeated appeals of our Archbishops to go unheeded? Shall we let this devoted woman stand alone between a just God and His avenging wrath to atone for a "Century of Dis honor? Shall she alone offer her life as a vicarious reparation for the national crime, which makes the Indian an alien, an exile, a pauper in the land which God gave'him by the most sacred of titles? Shall we contribute to this catalogue of in iquities by our sinful indifference, which allows our Catholic brethren among the Indians to be forced into apostasy, and screen ourselves under the cowardly plea, "Am I my brother's keeper?" The unaccountable apathy on the part of American Cath olics to maintain and perpetuate this Christian work, inaug urated four centuries ago by "men of mercy, whose godly deeds have not failed;" by apostles who "sowed in tear.s" that we might "reap in joy;" by labors sanctified by more than thirty marty...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

AN APPEAL FOR INDIAN SCHOOLS. 117 Government on earth, within reach of the most generous Catholics in Christendom ! Shall twelve millions of Catholics shirk the sacred re sponsibility of trying to save two thousand despoiled, soul endangered Indian children? Will they allow the one-hundred and six thousand Catholic Indians to clamor for the Bread of Life and its dispenser, the Black Gown, and turn a deaf ear to their pleadings? Shall we can we, in defiance of the claims of fraternal charity, nay common humanity, allow these, our brethren in the household of the Faith, to relapse into sin, savagery and heathenism without extending the hand of Catholic fellowship and Christian helpfulness? Brothers of the American Federation of Catholic Socie ties our Catholic Indian schools must stay ! Our Catholic Indian missions dare not be abandoned ! To you we appeal to inaugurate and carry out this great act of national repara tion to the Indian; to you we look to come to the aid of Holy Mother ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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