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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1988

PAGE 18 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1988 WOODEN THREAD SPOOLS BY: IVALIEN H. BELCHER © 1988 The other day I was going through my Granny Dollie's old treadle sewing machine drawers and came upon some old wooden thread spools. Well, I thought the thread these days is rarely on a wooden spool. Then I got to thinking of some of the uses my family has made of these spools. First of all, they made a good teething ring for the babies when they were cutting teeth. You could put a string on thread spools around the baby's neck and it would chew away and play. As a child I used the wooden spools for a bubble blower. First, rub a bit of soap on the end, dip in some soap suds and just blow all kinds of rainbow bubbles. I still love to blow bubbles for my grandson and watch him trying to catch them. One of my favorite toys made from the spool was a "dancer" (That's what we called them). It was as good as any toy and if you put dots of brightly colored paint, when spinning, the dancer appeared to be o...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1988

It was late, almost midnight, by the time my oldest brother Harold and I banked the fire in the cannery boiler. The night was warm and still with that dark softness you feel in the mountains after an endless, hot summer day. The first days in August in Carroll County, Virginia are a magic time when the promises of summer are fulfilled. Blackberries, huckleberries and raspberries grow in thick profusion - you're watching the world doze in the steaming days of summer as it has a million, million times before and as it will again and again on into infinity after you have ceased to watch and suffer. The small community of Lambsburg, Virginia extends from the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains to the gentle tobacco country along the North Carolina line. It is a remote farm community with a mosaic of farms and strong log buildings standing against the wooded hills along Stewart's Creek. When seen from high in the mountains, along Piper's Gap road in late summer, it's like one of Grandm...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1988

PAGE 20 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1988 Barney was the son of Elder James Thompson, one of the Charter Members of the Laurel Fork Primitive Baptist Church established in 1864. The church still has his writings as clerk. He and his wife are buried in an unmarked grave near his old homeplace. Barney married Martha who was the daughter of Issiac Dalton. The Thompson's settled a few miles from Laurel Fork Primitive Baptist Church and they owned land along the Laurel Fork Creek. They owned a mill and did grinding for a number of years. This was a very necessary part of country life in those days. Most all of the small farms grew their own grain. They had small patches of wheat, rye, buckwheat, and corn. These small self-sufficient farms grew and made most everything their families needed. Barney and Martha had twelve children; six boys and six girls. Three died in infancy. There was only one grandson belonging to the Thompson name. Today he has two sons living in Win-ston-Salem, North Caroli...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1988

•........... ■ • • •................. .......... .....v.. ................. . ■ , .■ • ••••• ■■ • ••• ■ • • ■■■•• "• • ' " '"'' '''' ■ ;. S: JMmw&SL .m lMilMr»^ SKjOr #» jy^K Granny Ruth's "Crush" Cake 3 cups of plain flour 2 3/4 cups sugar 1 cup of crisco (solid) 1/2 stick of margarine 1 cup of Orange Crush (the soft drink) 5 eggs 1/2 teaspoon of salt 1 teaspoon of vanilla 1 teaspoon of orange flavoring (Optional, Granny Ruth never used it.) Cream together the margarine, crisco and sugar. Then add one egg at a time and beat well after each egg. Keep beating until light and fluffy. Sift together the dry ingrediants. Then add alternately to the creamed mixture with the Orange Crush. Then add the vanilla and orange flavoring. Bake at 325° for and hour and ten minutes in a tube pan. Our thanks to Mrs. Ruth Hayes Thigpen of Kernersville, North Carolina for this recipe. She has been baking it with great success for many years. OLD PHOTOS We would like to thank Bobie Clement o...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1988

PAGE 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1988 SHAWNEE *- «. THE COVI^^ N The SHAWNEE Improved Log Home Package Includes Pre-cut Wall Logs - Pre-cut Log Gable Ends - Pre-cut Log Rafters Quarter Log Garage Gable & Dormer - Pre-cut Floor Joists Girder Beam - Snow Blocks - Log Porch Post - Sills & Plates Ten-Inch Spikes - Hard Board Splines - Gasketing Energy Efficient Insulated Glass Windows & Doors with Removable Grilles - Pre-cut Window & Door Casing 26 Foot Dormer - Wood Preservative - Caulking 8 Hours of a site Technical Assistant. Plus Many Features To Numerous To Mention NOTE: Truss For Extension & Garage By Others For More Information Contact: Hap Pendleton 703-989-5400 Send $6.00 (Check or Money Order) for the complete Shawnee Log Home Planning Portifolio. Extra Option & Custom Designing Available To Suit Your Individual Needs. 703 SHAWNEE LOG HOMES, INC. 703 989-5400 R t . j ( Box 123, Elliston, Va. 24087 268-2243 M...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1988

BACKROAD (Continued from Page 24) Fancy Gap, Virginia. From here we will head south on US 52 toward Mount Airy, North Carolina. U£ (1.5) Directly ahead is a spectacular view of piedmont North Carolina. onto State Road 691. 4J) (0.4) On our left is the Saint Paul Intermediate School. SJL (0.2) To our left is a beautiful view. (1.0) Beginning here orchards intermittently line both sides of the road for the next several miles. Ml (1.9) Looking at the mountains rising to our right we can see Interstate 77 as it winds its way up the mountain from the piedmont of North Carolina. 9.0 (1.0) At this stop sign we will turn right onto State Road 620. A large green house operation is on our right immediately after we turn. 9.5 (0.5) We are now passing beneath the Interstate 77 overpass. 10.3 (0.8) And old stone chimney stands in the Maybetty Trading Pot* MEADOWS OF DAN, VIRGINIA Milepost 180 - 181 HOMEMADE [2oll] Mountain Crafts s/ BOOKS:Foxfire 1-8, $9.95; Fairydale Tragedy, 4.95; Man Who Move...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1988

"The Heart of the Blue Ridge" s\oun£ain Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life APRIL 1988 Volume 5 Number 1 $1.25 | PAGE 24 HOW TO FOLLOW BACKROAD TOURS. BACKROAD tours always make a complete loop back to the point where we started. The underlined numbers at the beginning of each paragraph indicate the total number of miles we've traveled from our point of beginning. The numbers in parenthesis () indicate the distance from the last point of interest that we passed. "BACKRO^j "Never take the main roads, they're the future with their stores, offices and service stations. Always travel the backroads. You can see the future tomorrow but backroads are the past and someday they may be gone. On backroads you can see old weathered barns with wagons and horse drawn hayrakes. There are meadows fenced with old chestnut rails and creeks that bubble and cascade over rocks that have never known polution. There's a part of our heritage on our backroads that no pen or camera will ever capture. There are ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1988

JL V WWi! "" cV [THLY JOURNAL OF MOUNTAIN LIFE laurel MONTHLY JOURNAL OF MOUNTAIN LIFE # * Josephine Cameron Strickler Sweeny in 1889 when she was 18 years old My mother, Josephine Cameron Strickler Sweeney, was born December 15,1881 at Floyd, Virginia, the fourth of eight children of Ballard and Celeste Sowder Strickler. She was a great grand-daughter of John and Sarah Linesay Helms, whose daughter, Nancy, married Samuel Strickler. She was a descendant of Jacob and Priscilla Prillaman of Callaway, Virginia, whose daughter, Anna, married Jacob Sowder. When her ancestors, Abraham Strickler, came from Zurich, Switzerland to Pennsylvania in 1700, he could weave on a sixteen shuttle machine and brought with him a large Bible which had been in the family for around four hundred years at the time. My mother told me about it. He was one of the first settlers in the Shenandoah Valley. When he crossed the Susquehanna River to come to Page County, Virginia, his little daughter Mary (Roads) to...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1988

PAGE 2 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1988 TALES MY MOTHER TOLD ME (Continued from page 1.) home, he stayed for days until he had made new shoes for everyone in the family. One time my mother's double cousin, Eliza Strickler (Simpson) was visiting there and he made new shoes for her too. One time when my mother was spending the night away from home with a friend, they all saw a big ball of fire come down near a grave yard. That made her feel so bad that she wished she was at home. Her brother Will's wife, Georgia Lancaster, who was raised up near New Haven Baptist Church said one night they saw something like a big lantern right over the church. They all walked down there to see what it was, but when they got there, it was gone. I think my mother and her brothers and sisters had a good time during their teenage years. They had riding horses and my mother said that in the races, her horse could keep up with any of them and was often times the winner. They had dances at their home and boys and ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1988

MY FLOYD COUNTY "ROOTS" BY: GAIL SUTPHIN ©I9BB Although the years spent in the mountains were very precarious and uncomplicated to me, looking back, I wonder just what those years must have been like for my parents, Tom and Pauline Bolt. My father had lost his mother a few years before I was born. Also, both my parents had brothers in the war, pretty close to the front lines of battle. My mother's brother, Daniel Belcher, and my father's brother, Lancie (Dick) Bolt, made it back home, but my father's youngest brother, Earnest Bolt, did not. The last word the family received about him said that he was captured and had pneumonia at the time. I guess there are many differences in a child's memory of events and an adult's, because I can only seem to remember the good times...like all of us going out in the evening to get the cows. While we might have to hunt for them it didn't take long because they had a cowbell around their necks and I can almost hear the sound they would make as we d...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1988

PAGE 4 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1988 CLAYTON AND MAMA S PUMPKIN TREES PRESERVED BY: JEFFERY LOCKHART ©I9BB In the summer, Grandma Lockhart tended a big garden. And you could make sure that she had at least one or more running vegetables growing along hand strung trellis. The Kentucky Wonder pole bean was her absolute favorite. This long, slender green bean was hanging in her garden every year. She also planted running squash, cucumbers, gourds and pumpkins. She said that you should never plant gourds near squash or pumpkins because gourds were wild and would cross with them and make the squash and pumpkins not fit to eat. Great Aunt Almoth told me a story about her brother Clayton and some special pumpkins her Mama raised. Grandma Lockhart had an idea about planting pumpkin seeds around the base of a tree and training the vines upward into the sturdy branches for support. Well, the idea turned out to be very fruitful. The vines ran like wildfire entwined into the branches of that tree a...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1988

1 "FLOYD COUNTY, VIRGINIA • Local Arts and Crafts • Mountain Culture • Rare Plants • Abundant Wildlife • Mountain Farms • Fresh Streams * • Fishing • Hiking • Camping • Craft Shops • Country Stores • Bluegrass Music • Art Gallery £ I 2 Friendly Country Folks • Restaurants • Lodging • Bed and Breakfast Inns • Bicycling • Christmas Shops P5 I J Festivals • Picnic Areas • Historic Sites • Hunting • Swimming • Bird Watching • Christmas Tree Capital of Va. Mabry MHI, Floyd county (Miiepost 176.1 B.R.P) J : HOW TO GET TO FLOYD COUNTY, VIRGINIA: ~\~JL ttrnnGfiofrf 7nn I •From NC: Take either Blue Ridge Parkway or 221 North 30 miles from Roanoke, VA Blue Ridge Parkway NC - interstate 771 rJr UU/v A loLLL 11J1J J • Interstate 77. Blue Ridge Parkway traverses the entire county. V • • *From Blue Ridge Parkway: North on Rt. Bat Miiepost 165.2 I Miippost 165.2 / j °©cr and Breakfast J ! •From Interstate 81: Exit 36 (Christiansburg). South on Rt. 822 miles I 8 (f Miiepost 153 r /. | 7% miles nort...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1988

PAGE 6 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1988 This is a serialized, true story of a poor Ozark family in the 1930's through the eyes of one of their children. Experience their hardships and heart warming togetherness as they struggle through and celebrate life in the Ozark Mountains. By the middle of July all of our crops were layed by and there was more leisure time for all our family. Papa and Mama had both been feeling poorly so after the chores were all done up, they'd just sit and talk about us children all growing up or about politicians and wars and other things we'd heard about on the Jenkins' radio. I spent a lot of time in the attic reading all the books the Shaughnessy's had left there and some new books I'd sneak from beneath Earl's mattress. They were yellow backed Westerns and Widow Pollard had prayed about them in church. She said they were as bad for boys to read as True Story's were for girls. I hated to be so bad and read things I shouldn't, but I loved those westerns; especial...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1988

I am Heinrich, a brown haired Dachshund, brush tipped here and there with black. My face and feet have turned to white and I can barely walk these days. I've had some pleasant times in life but if I've learned anything in my sixteen years of life it's this: I'll never understand the ways of Man. You've gotta do this and you gotta do that. It's okay to sit on the couch but don't get caught on the easy chair. Food and Drug says no to any restaurant or Super Market. Yet I eat right in the kitchen. Some welcome me in their motels; others won't permit me. Just when you've dozed off for the night, they wake you up and take you for a walk in the nippy air. You sit around in the house all day, but no one thinks of going for a walk. They wait till night when all is dark and things make scary shadows and trees and bushes talk in time to the wind. I'd never go it alone then! Those are all everyday things a dog can learn to put up with, but what really gets me, now in my old age, is that they'v...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1988

PAGE 8 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1988 LEAVE A HOUSE HISTORY Have you ever moved into an old house and wished you knew more about it? Have you wondered about the people who built it and the lives they lived in it? I have never moved into a house where the previous owners even left as much as a diagram describing where the septic tank is located, but then I have been guilty of the same thing myself. When you move out of a house, you are so intent in not forgetting to take everything you do not even think about what you should leave behind. Consider starting a house history. Write in it all the practical information you had to learn the hard was such as "Don't bump your head on the attic doorway", and useful information such as names of exterminators, plumbers and other service people near by that have given you good service. But don't stop there. To help new owners really feel at home, leave a history of the house, all the information you have learned about it during your stay. Include the...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1988

Every Saturday afternoon, Peddler Pete parked his clattering, banged-up truck in a small clearing just west of the school house in Dwarf, Kentucky. The truck's bed had been removed and Peddler Pete had replaced it with a wooden room on wheels. Out of the back of his truck, he sold just about everything miners and their families needed. Cooking utensils, washtubs, material for making shirts and dresses, work shoes, overalls, buttons, needles, shoestrings, razors, scissors, hand-operated hair cutting clippers, belts, suspenders, rifles, shotguns, ammunition, red-headed kitchen matches, ink pens, pencils, parts for treadle sewing machines, dinner pails, hard candy, and fresh produce when in season- Peddler Pete had those items and more. Peddler Pete didn't have to advertise. Everyone in the coal camp knew exactly when he'd show up and small gatherings of women, lots of kids, and a few men were always waiting for him. He'd throw open the back doors to his small store on wheels, and anno...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1988

PAGE 10 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1988 My mother Elizabeth, daughter of John Scot and Cora Virginia Roach, was like a flower. Just being in her presence was a joy. She had wisdom and understanding, the gift of holding one's attention when speaking. She found great joy in entertaining with encouraging tales of human goodness. Often she has told me of the yearly event that took place at her home on Lewis Mountain as she was growing up called the Mutton Feast. I remember no story she enjoyed more than this one. As you may know; the American Indians had tribes with those who were the strongest in body, soul and spirit being chief. The mountain people had clans, and just by mutual agreement they operated somewhat the same way in order to survive. This type of government worked well where love brought harmony, harmony brought unity, unity brought power, and everyone was caught up in the benefits. I am sure Mama felt a touch of dignity because her parents were the heads of the liwis Mountain cl...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1988

DO YOU REMEMBER... Do you remember canned milk? It was probably a product of the World War II era when fresh milk was hard to come by and rations were being sent overseas. Canned milk didn't need to be refrigerated until after it was opened. There never seemed to be a time in my childhood that there wasn't a small can of Carnation milk sitting on the refrigerator shelf. Those cans didn't have a raised lip on them that would accommodate a can opener, so they always had two holes punched on opposite sides of the top. It was always a terror to me to watch those holes being punched with a kitchen knife. I remember watching the knife poised atop the can, my father or mother's hand holding the handle and the hitting the top of the knife with their other hand to force the knife point through the metal lid. I held my breath. The knife never slipped, but I knew there was a danger of it. It seems like no matter how well you wiped the drips off after each use, milk would still dry around the h...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1988

PAGE 12 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1988 The Mail Box Dear Susan, I was late in reading the December Backroads, but I must tell you how much I enjoyed it. It was almost as good as a trip back to my beloved Grayson County, Virginia. We can now make the trip from Princeton to Wytheville in a very short time, since the two tunnels were built through the East River Mountain and Big Walker Mountain. The places you mention are so familiar to me; Galax, Hillsville and Woodlawn. A trip to the big city of Galax was a big event in a small child's life. The bridge crossing the New River was a vast improvement to the ferry that crossed the river.Well do I remember getting out of the car with my younger sister and sitting on the edge of the ferry, taking our shoes and socks off and dangling our feet in the water. Of course Independence was closer to home and being the county seat was visited often, many times by horse and buggy. The communities of Bridle Creek and Flat Ridge brings back memories as doe...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1988

| GENEALOGY For several years now I have been attempting to trace my family tree. My paternal tree the THORTONS. Meredith Thorton married in Montgomery County, Virginia to Louise W. Bowden April 8, 1833. Eight of his children were born in Pulaski County, Virginia. On February 16, 1851 Meredith Thorton bought property in Mercer County, Virginia and moved there. Meredith died on June 1, 1865 in Mercer County (now West Virginia). His death certificate lists parents as T. and Susan (maybe Thomas). Four more children were born to this union. The third son, William Marion Thorton, was my great grandfather. I wonder if anyone in the area knows this family. I particularly want to know the full name of Meredith Thorton's father or sisters to Meredith. Thank you for your help. Evamay Beckner 3115 E. Buck Court Inverness, FL 32652 Subscribe Today or J liunl Send a Friend a Gift to The Mountain Laurel # Monthly Journal of Mountain Life Subscribers: With each subscription we'll send a Yc3F (12 I...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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