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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1998

June 1998 (A Free Service to Members) Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau News accepts classified advertisements only from members of the Virginia Farm Bureau. One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each member. If the ad runs more than 15 words, then the member must pay $5. Ads over 30 words will not be accepted. I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please TYPE your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. (You do not have to use this coupon.) I Classified ads WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. I DEADLINE: Ads must be received by the STH of each month preceding the publication month. I Repeat ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each issue in which they will appear. I Ads MUST include member number to be published. (For your convenience we are providing this coupon. Please submit ads to the Farm Bureau News before the sth.) NAME: MEMBER NO.: COUNTY: ADDRESS: CITY: STATE: ZIP: DAYTIME PHONE ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1998

Farm Bureau News Competition can bring out best in young farmers Imagine a shiny Dodge Ram 3500 Club Cab 4X4 truck parked in your driveway. It's a 1999 truck and you don't owe a penny on it. Think of the rumble of power you'll hear when you turn the key to crank the 24valve Cummins diesel engine. This truck can be yours if you're a young farmer and can win a few contests. I'm talking about the Young Farmer of the Year competition now underway. The main thing you've got to do in this competition is show that you've made a lot of progress on your farm since your early farming Store event to show farmers' share Our food supply is abundant and inexpensive. Yet the farmer receives only a small portion of each food dollar. To make people aware of that, women's committees across the state will be helping with our annual Farmers' Share program. We will be stationed at seven urban Food Lion stores—one in each of our districts —on June 17. We figured consumers who are more removed from rural ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1998

June 1998 Eil&MlMHKui wmlfel v This is the greenhouse at the research center where scientists look for ways to improve Virginia's forests and make timber growth more profitable. Advertisement Are you over 55? "It's All Free for Seniors" Washington DC (Special) Are you ► Free help if you have arthritis of There's more! Much, much more, over 55... or have a loved one who any type. and "Free for Seniors" comes with is? Then you'd better take a close ► Incontinence is not inevitable, a solid, no-nonsense guarantee, look at this! These free facts could help you. Send for your copy today and Every year Uncle Sam gives ► Free eye treatment. examine it at your leisure. Unless away hundreds of millions of ►Osteoporosis: Learn about the it makes or saves you AT LEAST dollars in cash, goods, and services causes, risk factors and new ten times its cost, simply return it to people just like you. treatments. for a full refund within 90 days. Better yet, most of these goodies ► Depress...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1998

m Over 12 Health Insurance Plans To Choose From. Not everyone has the same Medical needs... Choice: Plus not everyone has the same budget for Health Insurance...That's why Virginia Farm Bureau offers a Choice of Health care programs and options. Why pay for coverage you do not need? Best Value Now you can choose a plan which will give you the coverage you For Your Dollar: need... and will fit your budget. We believe quality protection and personal service go hand in hand. fIK 1 Personal Service: With over 100 local Farm Bureau offices throughout Virginia, V V personalized service can be as close as your own community. % Jr _ , _ - Health Care Coverage Broad Kange Ot # j£ y OU are un( j er a g e 55 — £ or Individuals or families i « p Coverage • If y OU are over age 65 — Medicare supplement • If you are a small business — coverage for 2-99 employees. You choose the health care plan that fits your needs... and your budget! ■■■. if tobacco suddenly dls- l une is dalr Y month anfi Now's...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1998

visit our website at www veto com Farm Bureau Volume 57, Number 6 All spiders can bite, even non-poisonous By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist RICHMOND—AIong with summer's outdoor activities come summer's pests. Spiders, ticks, mosquitoes, wasps and other pesky critters are crawling, flying, biting and stinging right now. Summer is the season for bugs—especially this year. "We've had a mild winter, lots of moisture and warm weather. That's a good start for our nuisance insects," said W. Philip Eggborn, program manager for the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services' Office of Plant and Pest Services. "They're out now: mosquitoes, ticks, chiggers, fleas and spiders. "Some insects come inside, but they're certainly more of a problem for people outside." And while you can't avoid going outside, there are ways to reduce your chances of problems Teachers using lessons on farming iihv -ms w m Hi from summer pests. "With a little precaution, you can reduce the li...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1998

Farm Bureau News Bad year expected for many Virginia farmers By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND — America's economy is the best in decades, but Virginia farmers are bracing for a bad year because of low crop and livestock prices. Barley prices are the lowest in 26 years, while wheat prices are the lowest in five. Corn, which is America's largest crop, and soybeans are down too. An over-supply of hogs and turkeys has driven those prices down, and cattle prices have dropped too. Chicken or broiler prices are likely to see little change because "demand for poultry Is in better shape than for red meat," said Dr. Wayne Purcell, an agricultural economist at Virginia Tech. "Dairy producers are struggling right now," Purcell noted. "The government is no longer willing to buy surplus dairy products and give them to schools or ship them overseas to poor countries. "If our prices move below $ 12 (per 100 pounds of milk) we're in serious shape," he added. "Virginia producers need $...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1998

July 1998 Farmers needn't be scapegoat for Pfiesteria When my son was a little boy, he occasionally borrowed my shovel, rake or pliers without telling me. I didn't mind his borrowing of tools, except when he left them in the woods in the rain. Whenever I misplaced a tool, I had a tendency to blame my son when, in fact, he had not used that particular tool. My wife often found tools I had misplaced. It's human nature to make false assumptions based on circumstantial evidence. Last summer, an outbreak of Pfiesteria piscicida occurred in the Chesapeake Bay. Before long, farmers got blamed for this toxic dinoflagellate that has been associated with fish lesions and fish kills in coastal waters from Delaware to North Carolina. Some assumed nutrients from farms had moved into streams and then into the Bay and created conditions in which Pfiesteria could flourish. Pfiesteria seems to flourish in poorly flushed waters, such as coastal estuaries, according to Dr. JoAnn Burkholder, professor ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1998

Farm Bureau News Farming's future is priority in Virginia (Continued from page 1) farmland. DuVal cited examples of Lowe's and K-Mart stores that vacated buildings and moved to larger structures. UPS and MCI then moved into those vacated buildings rather than put new facilities on farmland. Agriculture is a part of the governor's strategic plan for Virginia's economic development, DuVal said. In fact, a board of advisers for the strategic plan will include ag leaders, he noted. Gilmore's goal is to create 250,000 new jobs in the commonwealth through the plan. Stressing the importance of agriculture to the state's economy, DuVal noted that $1.7 billion in cash receipts come from the Old Dominion's top 10 agriculture commodities each year. They are broiler chickens, milk, beef, turkeys, tobacco, corn, soybeans, hogs, eggs and wheat. The top five cash crops—tobacco, corn for grain, soybeans, wheat and peanuts—amount to $507.8 million in cash receipts, he added. Tobacco production amoun...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1998

July 1998 jM The perfect choice for your farm truck is a Even our Ram Vans and Ram Wagons are part Dodge. And if you're a member of the Farm of the deal. Get $500 hack on new '91 and '98 jjR Bureau® this is the perfect in stock. That's on top of fx. time to buy one. any other national Dodge mjk \ As a member, you qualify consumer incentive W^k\ for $400 cash back on offer.** All you need and Club Cab Pickups* cate from your state's Farm on Bureau Ram 2500 and 3500 you've been a member for Mjj|& Pickups and Jj/K*™* at f east jq d a y S Then stop SB Chassis Cabs, and on our new 2500 and 3500 by your Dodge dealer. Where you '11 find a qf&mjjm ||i|l| Quad Cabs™ This offer covers our full line of line of trucks that work as hard as you do. li 111 engines, including the V-6, V-8, V-IO 'Excludes Quad Cab. **This cash back offer is valid for members of participatMl rind the ininroved Cummin v Turbo Diesel ing Farm Burcaus ' is scheduled to ex P ,re 7/31/98 - and is s...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1998

Farm Bureau News Here's how to keep your money in the family Looking for strategies to keep your money in the family? What financial objectives motivate you? Maybe you want to reduce taxable income and estate taxes. Perhaps you want to help a child pay for college or buy a home. The Virginia Society of Certified Public Accountants offers the following advice. One of the easiest ways to keep money in the family while at the same time lowering your taxable income (and estate taxes when you die) is to give assets to your children. When you make gifts, you are, in effect, removing the amount of the gift as well as any future earnings and appreciation from your taxable income and taxable estate. If your child is age 14 or older as of Dec. 31, any unearned income the assets earn will be taxed at the child's rate. The annual gift-tax exclusion allows you and your spouse to make gifts of up to $10,000 to each of your children (and other individuals) free of federal gift tax. When making joi...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1998

July 1998 Ammmmmim^m» i.■i H 'm .hhty. Ag lessons are exciting (Continued from page 1) "We need to let our children know what a big business agriculture is," said Patti Patterson-Taylor, a sth-grade teacher and teacher trainer from Idaho, who was at a national conference for the first time. "When our children get up in the morning and eat a bowl of cereal, they need to thank a farmer," said Mrs. Patterson-Taylor, who lives in a rural area and is surprised by how many students still don't know where milk comes from. She thinks AITC can change that. And Mrs. Patterson-Taylor hoped to learn new methods for teaching agriculture in her state's classrooms. Mrs. Patterson-Taylor and about 30 other people attending the "Designer Genes" workshop dipped Identify your weeds through e-mail photos BLACKSBURG—Weeds can grow into a real problem for farmers and gardeners, but Virginia Tech has found a way to help deal with those pesky plants by e-mail. If a mysterious plant is invading your crops, ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1998

Farm Bureau News Poultry tours enlighten reporters around state By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist POWHATAN—After visiting David and Vernon Moyer's poultry farm in Powhatan County, TV reporter Derricke Dennis is convinced that farmers are sensitive to the environment. "I'm impressed that Vernon (Moyer) has a degree in environmental science," said Dennis, who works for Richmond's WRIC-TV 8. "His education makes him more sensitive to the environment." Dennis, along with 16 other TV, radio and newspaper reporters, visited poultry farms across Virginia June 2-4 to find out what kind of voluntary environmental contributions poultry producers are making. The farm tours, sponsored by the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, were held in response to accusations that the state's poultry £ W a Bk% : . #8 S?' iBH KL | /v jfp industry is degrading water quality in the Chesapeake Bay and needs more regulation. To help educate the media, the tours were held June 2 in Rockingham County, Jun...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1998

July 1998 River tour highlights farms' good practices By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Editor PAMUNKEY INDIAN RESERVATION—Here, where the Pamunkey River nearly loops around on itself, is where the good stewardship practices of local farmers truly shine. That's according to Billy Mills, program coordinator of the York River Watershed Council, who spoke to a group of reporters and agriculture communications specialists June I. "Farmers have led the conservation movement down here," Mills said as he stood beside a pristine tidal flat that averaged just 1 foot in depth at high tide. Great blue herons flew overhead as the wind rustled through acres of large-leafed water plants, and fish jumped in the open waters. lit "'-' > 4',!A .*k , B ,ft I ■„■ _. JSLt * • ' »""<L itMatMlßammSttmKmlUL. - .afejgrfat. _ ', ■- -<n«a. !♦../• J .■>• n't 'fpT v-f', i» I ■ ■ ■' * iv 4 ... —I -i iuilu ij ~, **mm u •<' g ~ !f|^ ERJCMIU-EWFW • "Farmers are worki...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1998

Farm Bureau News Be sure to inspect your clothing for ticks (Continued from page 1) And if you have been outside farming, camping, hiking, fishing, picnicking or gardening, check yourself closely for ticks when you get inside, Eggborn suggested. If you find a tick, remove it with tweezers as quickly as possible. Do not touch the tick with bare fingers, cautions the health department. "If you've been bitten by a tick and start feeling bad, you should call your doctor," Eggborn said. Spider bites can be prevented with a little caution, he explained. "Spiders like cool, damp, dark places like mulch, wood piles and debris," Eggborn said. "You should try to avoid spiders because they ail bite, although they're not necessarily poisonous," he explained. "But if you leave them alone, they'll leave you alone." Virginians should be on the lookout for black widow spiders, which can often be found under cantaloupes and watermelons in fields. They are small and black—about the size of a pencil e...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1998

July 1998 Prices drop for wheat, soybeans, corn, barley (Continued from page 2) of the environmental regulation burdens and labor concerns as we do," Neale said. "Their costs of production are significantly lower, and they're selling products in the same markets we are." Most, if not all, of Virginia's feed corn never leaves the state. Instead, it goes for hog and poultry feed. But some soybeans, wheat and barley are exported from Virginia. The low grain prices have "actually helped" some livestock producers in the Shenandoah Valley, said Richard Reeves, president of the Staunton Farm Credit Association. "Poultry people are buying grain at lower prices. A lot of barley from eastern Virginia is coming to us at very reasonable prices. "One's gain is another's loss," Reeves said. However, in the Shenandoah Valley, an over-pro-duction of turkeys has cut profit margins significantly for producers there, he noted. Forty percent of U.S. ag exports go to Asia, which is buying fewer agricult...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1998

Farm Bureau News Persuasive speakers can open many doors Before he became a famous orator and statesman in Athens, Demosthenes is said to have lost a valuable piece of property simply because he was unable to speak well. When someone died and left an estate, Greek law more than 2,000 years ago allowed any interested party to publicly speak and claim the property. The property is said to have belonged to a relative of Demosthenes and he should have become the rightful owner. But an eloquent and persuasive speaker lay claim to the property and won it. Demosthenes, who lived 384322 BC, is said to have had a Be thankful you live in America Did you know that Americans consume an average of 64 pounds of poultry each year? And did you know that poultry is Virginia's top agricultural commodity, with cash receipts of $466.4 million in 1996? How about apples? Did you know that they are Virginia's top fruit, with 275 million pounds harvested in 1996? Facts and figures about Virginia agricultur...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1998

July 1998 Farmers' share is not much (Continued from page 9) everything. I'm surprised they're not in the hole after that." The "farmers' share" of her $69 food bill was $15.80. VFBF Women's Committees sponsor the "Farmers' Share" program annually in different Virginia localities to educate the public about the surprising statistic. "It's not something people think about. In this country we are blessed with such bounty that people go to the grocery store and they get anything they want, but they don't think about where it comes from or the person who produces it," said Ellen Davis, women's committee chairman for Charles City, lames City, New Kent and York counties. Thelma Pultz, shopping at a Food Lion store in Staunton, said of the 23 percent, "1 think it's a shame. I grew up on a farm, and I know how much time and effort go into producing crops. I think farmers should get more." Ken Slack, a reporter with the Staunton bureau of Charlottesville's WVIR-TV 29, covered the event at a ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1998

■ 2 ■ § f bU I J I I ■ I B al 1 | Hi w I | V£| ||1 U ■ i j H I ft ■ ■II pi | I I w(| I | V | 111 Wi ■. JSMBii»MBMiiiiiiMiiiBiBiBiMMMMiBBHMI^^SiJM^' j '' r v — Over 12 Health Insurance Plans To Choose From. Not everyone has the same Medical needs... Choice: Plus not everyone has the same budget for Health Insurance...That's why Virginia Farm Bureau offers a Choice of Health care programs and options. Why pay for coverage you do not need? Best Value Now you can choose a plan which will give you the coverage you For Your Dollar: need... and will fit your budget. fHHHw We believe quality protection and personal service go hand in hand. \ LtfJ»§ Personal Service: With over 100 local Farm Bureau offices throughout Virginia, y * personalized service can be as close as your own community. * , am' R j „ f Health Care Coverage © . ivange oi # jf y OU are unc j er a g e 55 — f or Individuals or families • q Coverage • If y OU are over a g e 65 — Medicare supplement • If you are a small busines...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1998

visit our website at www.vafb.com Farm Bureau Volume 57, Number 7 Conservation tillage protects environment By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist SUTHERLAND—Susan and Maxwell Watkins Jr. plant all of their corn, most of their soybeans and half of their cotton without tilling the land. "The more I've done it, the better I've liked it," said Maxwell Watkins, who has been farming for 20 years in Dinwiddie, Prince George, Sussex and Amelia counties. "I'm using no-till more and more," added Watkins, who intends to plant pumpkins no-till next year and eventually, his tobacco. "If I thought it would work, I'd use no-till 100 percent." Watkins is like most farmers in that he wants to plant his crops with as little disruption of the land as possible. "I'm firmly convinced that farmers want to no-till everything, all the time," said Dr. Dan Brann, Extension grain crop specialist at Virginia Tech. Conservation tillage, which is (See Conservation, Page 7) This is a field of soybeans pla...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1998

Farm Bureau News Research is improving pest management By DR. AMES HERBERT Editor's note: Dr. Ames Herbert is an entomologist with Virginia Cooperative Extension, and he is based at the Tidewater Agricultural Research and Extension Center in Suffolk. Integrated pest management has been a part of pest control in agriculture for more than 20 years and has long been recognized for its positive impact on the environment. It's also known as a successful economic control of crop pests. Generally, where IPM practices are adopted, the use of pesticides is reduced, or at least made more efficient. What is IPM? The best definition that I have seen was developed by IPM leaders in the Chesapeake Bay states of Delaware, Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia. The definition is: "IPM is a management approach to pest control that uses knowledge of pest biology and population dynamics combined with regular monitoring to determine if and when treatments are needed. Multiple tactics are integrated toget...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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