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Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern ... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 5,897 items from Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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TRANSVAAL TERMINATIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 6 July 1917

TRANSVAAL TERMINATIONS. In perusing the names of South African towns in the daily news papers, many must have noted the word "fontein," which appears so of ten. This word is the English "foun tain," and towns with this termina tion" have been named after Dutch farms, which are always built beside fountains of spring water. Thus, Bloemfontein means "flowery fountain"; Modderfontein, "muddy fountain"; Kleinfontein, "small foun tain"; and Elandsfontein, "deer foun tain."' Another town termination which readers must have noticed is that of "laagte," which is pronounced i "laughty." It means "shelter for animals," and hence, when we talk of the Battle of Elandslaagte, we may know that it was fought on a spot fre quented by deer.

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DANGER OF HIGH COLLARS. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 6 July 1917

DANGER OF HIGH COLLARS. That high collars tend to produce nervous headaches among both men and women Is the recent discovery of a well-known Parisian physician. Quite accidentally the doctor's atten tion was directed to the vory high and very tight style of collar warn by a patient who was always complain ing of headaches and giddiness. The collar was laid aside, thus removing the compression of the neck, and the patient's headaches and giddiness dis appeared. Struck by this result, the doctor paid particular attention to the kind of collars worn by his "headache pa tients," and in very many instances the change to lower and easier-fitting collars brought immediate relief. In the case of women wearing high, stiff neckbands it was found that doing 'away with these had a similarly bene ficial result. The doctor declares that nobody with any tendency to head ache should wear high collars. A statesman is a man who tries to do his country good, but a politician is one who tries to "do" h...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ARE C0MPOSERS SHORT-LIVED? [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 6 July 1917

ARE C0MP08ER8 SHORT-LIVED? f I It is somewhat striking to note that i a number of great musicians were af flicted with physical infirmities. Mo zart, who only lived to the age of thirty-three, died of consumption. Schumann, who died at the age of forty-six-was for some years before his death confined in an asylum. Beethoven reached the age of fifty seven, but for many years previous to his death this great man of music was quite deaf. Mendelssohn died at the age of thirty-six, Schubert at thirty one, Weber at forty, Chopin at forty, Purcell at thirty-seven, and Bellini at thirty-three. There are, of course, a few exceptions. Bach, Haydn, and Handel all outlived their three-score years and ten. The latter, however, was for some years totally blind.

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Looked Suspicious. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 6 July 1917

Looked Suspicious. As Widow Watts bent industriously over her waslitub she was treated to. polite conversation by a male friend, who presently turned the conversation on matrimony, winding up with a pro posal of marriage. "Are ye sure ye love me?" sighed the liuxom .widow, pausing "in her wringing. , And the man vowed he did. For a few minutes there was a si lence as the widow continued her la bor. Then suddenly she raised her head and asked him, suspiciously: "You ain't lost yer job, 'ave yer?"

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Acquired Bravery. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 6 July 1917

Acquired Bravery. ' ; . ;v Willis: You think ' these summer, military camps tend' to make a man a brave lighter? } Gillis: Yes. Alter I returned from the first one I got married, after I "got 'back; this year ! had a row with my ^mother-in-law, and after my re turn next 'year I'm going to fire the cook. . : ..

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Grave and Gay. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 6 July 1917

Grave and Gay. Tourist: You have a very large acreage ot com under cultivation. Don't the crows trouble you a gooil dea'.? Farmer: Oh, not to: any extent! , Tourist: That's peculiar,; consider ing yo.u'have no scarecrows! . Farmer: Oh, well, I'm out here a i good part of the time myself.

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AN INDICATION OF LONG LIFE. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 6 July 1917

AN INDICATION OF LONG LIFE. Women are supposed to be longer lived than men. An authority says that every woman can tell from her own features if her life is to be a short or a long one. The woman who will live long must have eyes round and wide rather than long and narrow, and if They are brown or hazel life will be longer than if they are black or blue. The brow must be ample and slope slightly from an absolute perpendicular. The head must be wide behind and over the ears. The mouth must be full and well set, and the chin square and firm. The nose must be wide and full through it3 whole length, and have open, easily dilating nostrils. This indicates a good heart and good lungs. If the orifice of the ear is low, denoting a deeply seated brain, there is a better chance of long life for its possessor.

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NOT WHAT THEY SEEM. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 6 July 1917

NOT WHAT THEY SEEM. Every day we use words which, if they were taken literally, would mean utter nonsense. Here are a few of .them: There is no cream in cold cream, cream of tartar, or chocolate cream. Nor is there any milk in milk of magnesia, milk trees, or milk weed. Grape fruit contains no grapes nor bread-fruit bread. , Pine-apples have nothing to do with either pines or apples. There is no butter in butter-milk, butterflies or butter-cups. Sponges are not made into sponge cake. Cowslips have nothing to do with cows. Chickens have no more con nection with _ chicken-pox than a "cock-tail" has with the farmyard A horse chestnut, clothes-horse, horse-radish, all have no resemblance to a horse. : Boot-trees and family-trees do not grow in a forest, and neither are there any fish in a mackerel sky, geese in gooseberries or crabs in crab-appIeB.

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Criminal Nation. PRUSSIAN DUPLICITY. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 6 July 1917

A Criminal Nation. PRUSSIAN DUPLICITY. Admittedly Prussian militarism is responsible for the war. At the out set it was apparent to the world that Germany, dominated by- the Prussian' military class had determined that no thing should stand in her way. She had made up her mind that the world ?should bow to her will. Germany is not recognising civilisation and law, honor and justice. Thousands of mur ders cf the most callous kind have boon committed by German soldiers in Belgium and in France. The atroci ties on women i.nd children in France and Belgium are an oft-repeated tale. It was to obtain security from Ger many's "militarism that the Allies op posed her. Duplicity has ruled Ger many before the war and since the war. The Prussian military staff, with the evident intention of deceiv ing the Allies, has been recently trans mitting per medium of neutral coun tries messages to the world indicat ing that Germany and her Allies are weakening. These messages are evi dently calculated ...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Bad Judge. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 6 July 1917

A Bad Judge. An Irishman taking home a goose for his. Sunday dinner, went into an inn for slight refreshment. Laying down tlie goose, he was proceeding to satisfy his thirst when a seedy-look ing individual, seizing tlie goose, ?made off. He at once started after him, and ere running far, had his man by the neck. "What did yez take the bird for?" queried the irate Irishman. "Sure," said the seedy-looking man, "I took it for a lark." One may be in touch with the toothache without actually being in sympathy with It! _

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Waggish Non-Com. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 6 July 1917

Waggish Non-Com. I recently told a story on this p^ge concerning a recruit named . Monta gue, whose name was pronounced by a sergeant Montaig. Now there comes to me -a letter from a1 soldier reader who was actu ally present at the incident referred to, which indeed happened to his chum. He also sends me the following good story, for the truth of which he vouches. Some men were billeted (he writes) In a barn that was infested by rats. One man complained to his company officer, who sent him to the Quarter master's stores with a note which ran, "Please give bearer rat-poison." The Quartermaster-Sergeant read the note, and being a bit of a wag, .gave the man a rope.. Mr. Talcott had failed in business and sold out,'and having a.couple of little hills 'gave them to his lawyer for collection. The amount collected was about £14. "I am sorry , you've been so unfor tunate," said the lawyer, "for I take a great interest in you, Talcott. I shan't charge you as much as I should if I, didn't fee...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Mrs Gabbing's Grievances Narrated to Arnold Golsworthy. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 6 July 1917

Mrs Gabbing's Grievances Narrated to Arnold Golsworthy. 'We've got a 'bus that, runs through our village to the market town every two hours, . and. the conductor used to. he a nice young man, who was al ways very civil. Yqu could have knocked me down with a feather when, as X stopped the i 'bus the other.day, I found my nice conductor was gone and his place taken by a young woman who looked as much as anything like a picture 1 once saw of a circus girl who was the champion rifle-shot of the street, or something of that kind. I got one foot /m the step, and was just, trying to lift the other after it when she rings the. bell. . "Here, hold on!" I says. "I want to get to the other end all. In one piece if X can!" She didn't stop the''bus all at once, and so there was I holdin' on, and calling to her and hoppin' along he hind that 'bus, and not bein' able to catch up to it with me other foot nohow. I- reckon 1 must have hop ped the ti'est part of quarter of a mile before the 'bus stopp...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Broad Hint. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 6 July 1917

A Broad Hint. I was talking to a friend the other day whose small son possesses a very sweet tooth. . He had been told by his mother early in February that during Lent he. must give up, and" not expect, sweet cakes. He agreed, and a few days later he was invited to tea at the Vicarage. Toast was the chief delicacy on the Vicarage table, and when his hostess asked Jackie to have a second piece he looked up with puzzled eyes. "Is it Lent?" he asked seriously. "No, dear," replied the Vicar's wife. "Lent doesn't start until the twenty first. But why do yoij ask?" "Because I don't see any cake on the table," said Jackie in a pained voice. The body is the shell of the soul; apparel is the husk of that shell; the husk often tells you what the kernel is.

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
How Drugs Delude Dyspeptics. A. MENACE TO HEALTH. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 6 July 1917

How Drugs Delude Dyspeptics. A. MENACE TO HEALTH. DYSPEPTICS who lake drugs tct. crime against their health, for is not cure dyspepsia, neither do thtjw | the power to neutralist acid stomach, which is the underlying most forms of digestive and s trouble. Drugs may appear to lief in some cases of indiRejik dyspepsia, but that is because ti the nerves of the stomach and rend insensible to pain Herein lies >v danger; the symptoms of the ti,>5 covered up and hidden, while there the trouble, that is, the acid stomach-remains as active dangerous as bver, andmayinccs time cause gastric ulcers to fain. Physicians have demonstrated ott over again that the stomach C;E:s gain strength or the digestive o-jE cover their power to function tm unless kept free from irritant ;di this can be achieved with sifetj certainty by taking halt a teaspaii bisuraUd magnesia in a little rfi mediately after every meal. Itiai lied upon to neutralise acid and p fermentation of the focd. This method is now ...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
COMMITTEE MEETING. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 6 July 1917

COMMITTEE MEEUjg l ' The committee appointed ftra,||f$* above mealing, met at the Shire n^Sls Monday evuniug. 'Ilia faU0-«iaj,lt|| present-Meadnmea Tracy, Hon«tu'^M Coleman, Horwood, Howell, Qai"iK^ ker, Mason, Messrs Miles, How>|Vjfe§ ning, Oliurry, anrt M'Plierson. SiltESw Uer was voiort lo the chair, and man appointed acting secretary. -T,, Mr Mites moved that Councillori.|||| h»iu i'3 elected president of ttai^P Seconded by lira Q'lin, mid carried * On tbo motion of ileair# Colm-j* M'Pherson, Mra Honeychurch WiigJ vice-president. Mr Olid liowell wan elected t^ tin thu motion of Mr Cherry ls) j Honoychuroli. Mr Mi'.ea moved, that »3 Pora&j and Froeburgli have already fotSj association of their own, the work d 1 pocioly bn limited to Bright anJM gori^!, ;11 h! further, that thia societji 1 over the farewelling of autdiera. 85! 1 ded liy Mr Cherry, and catiitd. It waa ttRtacd, on 1I10 motioa rflj dninea Quin and Honeychurcli.toJjj subscription iec 111 fid per month. Mear...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Wrong Inference. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 6 July 1917

The Wrong Inference. As is well known, Dr. T. J. Mac namara, Financial Secretary to the Admiralty, spent his early manhood as a teacher in the Boa"! Schools, and as a result he is possessed of a budget of humorous stories anent the difficulties that are met with when endeavoring to develop youthful minds/ One relates to a young and en thusiastic teacher who was trying bis utmost to convey his idea of pity to his class. Said the teacher: "Now, supposing a man was work ing on a river and suddenly fell iDto the water. His wife, hearing Ms screams, and knowing full well his peril, rushed immediately to the bank. Why did she rush to the banlc? There was a dramatic pause. Then a small Voice piped out: "Please, sir, to draw his insurance money!"

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Cicely Vibart's Love. (Publisbed by Special Arrangement.) (Copyright.) CHAPTER XXVI. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 6 July 1917

Cicely Vibart's Love.j By ANNIE HAYNES Author of "Lady Carew's Secret,' "Footprints of Fate-,' Etc., Etc. (rublisbed. by Special Arrangement.) (Copyright.) CHAPTER XXVI. -May I come m? Stephen asked humbly. He was standing on the threshold of his wife's boudoir. Cicely raised herself from among the cushions on the couch and looked at him, a lovely rose-red, flush spread ing over her white face,, mounting to -the roots of her hair. For two days and nights Tony had lain in extreme danger. Both parents had watched over him with tenderest care, but Stephen had seen how his wife had avoided meeting his eye, how she had drawn herself away from the least chance of touching him. He had noticed that she never spoke to him unless actually compelled, and then in monosyllables. Early this morning Tony had been pronounced out of danger, and Cicely having laid him back on the bed had celebrated the occasion by quietly fainting away. Since then "she had been in the care of Mrs. Bowman and her maid...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Ovens Election. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 6 July 1917

The Ovens Election. Wkitisg in the " Ovens and Murray Ad vertiaer " of Saturday laet"Scriptua" aaya : -" Rumor lias reached ma that the Ovens Labor Party will inv-ilc either Mr Parker Moloney or Mr A. W. Foster, jun., to contest the electorate in their interest. IE this is the case, and should one or the other consent to Ihe nomin. ation, lie would make ilia running as close a contest as wo have had for many yeais. In Mr Moloney's ease he baa earned the reputation of the closest attention to (lie wants of his constituents, aiwajs prompt with his correspondence, and ever ready for an interview. During his residence in Beechworlh he made a host of personal friends, which he increased in other parts ? if the electorate by being tile Federal representative. 1 understand the State Parliamentary party are most anxious In "ecure Mr Moloney's services. With Mr Prendergaat well in years and Mr Elmslie in anything but robust health, he would have a good clnnco of the leadership in a &...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Every Shilling Counts. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 6 July 1917

Every Shilling Counts. ORGANISATION is as necessary in the war-saving campaign as in any other branch of national work-and the move ment has now assumed an importance which ranks it as nothing less than national. Sir John Forrest, the Common wealth Treasurer, announced last week that the Government had appointed a strong committee, to be known as the "Central War Savings Organisation,1' whose mission it will be to indoctrinate the people with a sense of their individual responsibility. The main obstacle it will have to overcome is that almost universal belief that what one person does amounts to nothing. The private citizen is prone to think that what he gives or what he wilh-hoJds is of no importance. He for gets, or does not realise, that all the most momentous national things are merely the multiplication of what the individual does. He depends too much on the law of average and on public bodies or Gorern ments doing all that is necessary to maintain that average. It is with a se...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Aiding British Red Cross Society. SCHOOL CONCEPT AT WANDILIGONG. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 6 July 1917

Aiding British Red Cross Society. SCHOOL CONCEPT AT WANDILI GONG. In response to a request made by the Education Department that a lapecial effort should be made in State Schools during the month of June for the British Red Cross Society, the head teacher of the Wandiligong State school (Mr T. W. Flower) and Ilia assistants, Missos Mare and M'Lean, Bet to work about a month ago to train the oliildren for a cantata. This duly came oil on Friday evening last, and was from every standpoint a great success. Prior to the entertainment starting, the local brass band, under Bandmaster Williams, rendered a number of selections iu capital style in the street, and at S o'clock the hall was completely filled. Mr W. H. Goldsworthy, who pre sided, briefly explained the objects of the concert, and then called upon Masters Dick Jagoe (violin) and Teddy Duncan (piano) to play the overture, which they did in capital stylo. The next item WBB provided by the younger members of the Fredo family-two lit...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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