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Title: Cobram Courier Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 20,149 items from Cobram Courier, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Chillingham's Herd of Wild Cattle. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 11 June 1914

Chiliingham's Herd of Wild Cattle. * The Chillingham herd of wild cattle, specimens of which have been enclosed in Chillingham Park, in Northumberland, since at least the thirteenth century, mid were known as a distinctive breed a couple of centuries ago. They are smalt, with very straight backs, rough and curly coats, and short, upwardly-directed horns in both sexes. \ The insides of ihe ears and the muzzles are red, although this is statei to be a recent change from black, and the hoofs and the tip% of the horns are symmetrically marked with black. They have the habits and appearance of genuine wild animals, and diner very much from any of the other park cattle. The herd keeps a Urn# way from the castle and is most ditlicult to approach, except in Winter, when a cart laden with hoy is allowed to come right among- the animals. When a calf is born the mother hides it in the bracken and re joins the herd, going at intervals to feed it. When there nro young cal ves about it is most da...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A TUFNELL PARK KLONDYKE. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 11 June 1914

A TU DWELL, PAIilv KLOXDYKE.' On April 3 0, IS 13, whilst en-*1 gaged in grubbing up the roots of Koine trees in Tufncll Park, eight labourers mine upon two jars con taining nearly four hundred • sover eigns in gold, which they forth with divided equally between them selves. They soon discovered, how ever, that "finding" docs not always mean "keeping," since, shortly after they had struck this "Klondyke" the lord of the manor came forward and claimed the whole of the spoil as treasure trove. While the labourers, however, were anxiously awaiting the result of this claimant's title to the specie, the original owner of it himself ap peared on the scene and told a sin gular tale. Some months Fjrevious he had suffered from some mental derangement, which caused* him to bury his money one night in tiie spot where the workmen found it. lleing able to substantiate this story, his claim was admitted. Itloobs: "When it comes to nn argu ment, a man generally gives in." Slobbs : "Yes; but have y...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Little Cross of Bronze [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 11 June 1914

The Little Cross of Bronze ♦ Although the Victoria Cross was instituted ns cnrly in the year (l85ti) us .January it was not until nearly eighteen months later—on June 1857—thnt Queen Vic toria, in the presence of tin im mense assembly in Hyde Park, Tinned the little Maltese Cross— made of Russian cannon from Se bastopol—upon the breasts of the first recipients of the order of va lour, a gallant group of sixty tun olliiers and men of both ser \iees. About .1 year later. her Majesty presented the Cross to a further do/en men on Southsea Common, but most oC those to whom it had been awarded were at thnt time still in India. In »all, rather over 500 officers and men have beep, decorated "for conspicuous bravery," but it is now nearly ten years since any names were added to tho list of honour, nets of gallantry in Thibet and So malUand in 1U01 being the last that brought the V.C. There are now only about 150 sur vivors of those who have gained the much-prized award in the fifty eight you...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Brain will be Man's Ruin. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 11 June 1914

Brain will be Man's Ruin. Man's downfall at the end of this geological rgo is likely to result from excessive brain development. At the Royal Institution the other day, Dr. S. A , Woodward drew attention to what is called mo mentum in evolution, and gave il lustrations of parts that hnve grown to unwieidly and useless size at the expense of other parts. Tly tho end of the i'laistocone or Gla cial period the formidable tusk of the sabre-toothed tiger had grown quite beyond any usefulness to tho nnimal. At the end of the samo period, doer, which had begun with smooth heads, had developed antlers of unwieidly size, and in a German species theso had even reached a span of twelve feot. Until the end of the Cretaceous period all nni-j mals were cold-blooded, with no great brain-power. , Then wnrm- J blooded animals appeared all over j the world, the enormous develop-1 ment of bodj' was checked, and the ' brain began to grow at the expense 1 of all the rest. Besides increasing in size, the...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Tower of Babel Discovery. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 11 June 1914

Tower of Babel Discovery. The Abbe Henri de Go/iouillnc, after his return from the excava tion at Babylonia, Raid he believed that he hud found *tho original of the Biblicul Tower of Babel. The Abbe was sent out on a mission of research * to El Ahyiner, about eighty miles south of Bagdad, and a short distance from Euphrates. Here he laid bare the remains of the primeval City of Kiss, one of the earliest capitals of Bahvlonia, far older than Babylon itself, and on covered nn immense palace, similar to the early royal buildings, dis covered elsewhere in that country. In the middle of the great court yard of the palace were the ruins of an immensely high tower, named "The Temple of the Foundation of Heaven and Earth," and sacred to the national god, Znmnina. This temple with its strange name is, thinks the Abbe de Oenouillac, the original of the Biblical legend of the tower which should reach from earth to heaven. * StuLuettos and vases were found among the ruins, -showing thai the lat...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PEN PICTURES OF THE PAST. THE "NINE" AT DELHI. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 11 June 1914

PEN PICTURES OF THE PAST. 1 THE " NINE " AT DELHI. Tlio storming of Delhi is one of | tho momorablo deeds of tho Indian 1 Mutiny; but tho tale of its evacua tion by the British forces, if less generally known, includes an inci dent hnrdly less heroic. It was thf*» first town to fall into tho power of tho Meerut massacre—the mounted j mutineers galloped into Delhi to raise tho standard of revolt. j Tho nlnrm and confusion caused by such a sudden eruption, the un certainty. as to liou< far the mu tiny had already spread, and, above all, tho presenco of English women and children, who would bo nt tho mercy of tho mob should tho Strug- j glo be unsuccessful, induced tho English commander to decido on tho evacuation of tho city; but beforo leaving with his troops ho gnvo or ders for tho powder nmgnzino to. bo exploded, lost its contents should | fall into the hands of the Sepoys. Lioutenants Willoughby, Forest, and Ray, with six British non coms., wero told oil for this dan ge...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WELL TIMED. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 11 June 1914

WELL TIM 12P. "That certainly was a very One sermon," said an enthusiastic church member who uas an anient admirer of the minister. "A fine sermon, and w'ell timed, too." "Yes," answered his unndmiring neighbour, "it certainly was well I timed. Fully half the congregation had their watches out."

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE INTRODUCTION OF VACCINATION. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 11 June 1914

T1II2 INTRODUCTION OF VACCI NATION. - On May 1-1, 3796, Kd ward Jcn ner conclusively established the im portant principles of vaccination, proving that it was possible to pro pagate the vaccine affection by ar tificial innoculation from one human being to another, and thus to pre vent smallpox, which dreadful di sease up to then had flourished ancl left its loathsome mark' on hundreds of the population. In r letter to his friend Gardiner, he tells how a boy named Phipps was inoculated in .the arm from a pustule on the hand of a young woman who was infected with cow pox, while milking . her master's cows. "The most delightful jmrl of my story is," he adds, "that tho ! boy hps since been inoculated for the smallpox, with, as I predicted, no effect Whatever." | Never was there a disco\ ery so | beneficial to the human race which ; met with so much determined oppo | sition. The lowest scribblers, ex 1 cited by political animosity or per-, sonal rivalry, never vented such coarse, illiber...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Growth of Dwarfs. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 11 June 1914

The Growth of Dwarfs. The case of a dwarf who took twenty years to crow ns much as nn ordinary child grows in five years was mentioned by Professor Hastings Gilford in a lecture on "InfantjJisin" at the Hoyal Col lege of Surgeons. -Many so-railed dwarfs, he pointed out, remained infants all their lives. And when thev grew old their infantile characteristics still persisted, "in spite of their wizened appearance. Growth continued un til well over thirty, mid even* then the dunrf might be no bigger than n child of six. Professor Gilford recalled one case in which the person passed as a child until nearly' thirty,' and al ways travelled tor half fare on the railways. . On the other hand, in many cases the intelligence was ex cellent. One boy of fourteen, so small that he .could pass for a baby in arms, took the leading role at one of the London theatres, ap pearing both as a baby and as a diminutive "man about town," and acting both parts with great abil ity. Midgets were intelligent a...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SOME CURIOUS EXPLOSIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 11 June 1914

SOME CUKIOUS F.X PLOSION'S. ! Apnrt from the ever-present clan ger due to the huge collcction of intricate and swifily-moving ma chinery with which most modern mills abound, there are other perils incidental to factory employment which are the more dreaded because . only half-understood. Sometimes : the hidden peril lies in the use of material that no one suspects of be ing unduly dangerous until the un expected happens. For example, on May 12, 1899, Krutz's chcmical fac- t tory at St. Helens, Lancashire, was totally destroyed by an ex plosion of potassium chloratc, a substance that up till then was re garded "as being entirely harmless. Five workmen lost their lives in this remarkable accident, and damage <rn dons to lb» amount of ovor on* hundred thousand pounds. Again a frightful factory disaster wn9 brought about through (ho caro less handling of « l>nx of paper caps for toy pistols. This happened in Taris on May 14, 1873. For years the industry had been carried on...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Cigarette Habit. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 11 June 1914

The Cigarette Habit. la America a crusado hns been started to curb the cigarette habit nmong boys and men. The \ new "cure" is the application of nitrate of silver on the pnlntes of the vic tims. This treatment, it is declar ed, hns been tried nt Chicago and elsewhere with .satisfactory results. Mr. .John Mcfiivern, the Now York Recorder, started the crusade ill that city by inviting " all cigarottc Etnokers desirous of breaking the habit" to meet him in the Court House. The Hecorder arrived in company - with two physicians from the mcdical stafY of the Hoard of Education, and found 800 men and boys waiting in the Courtroom to see what he could do for them. There were a few determined-look ing women accompanied by their sons, whom they wanted to present to the Recorder as " cigarette fiends." When the Recorder said that the doctors wore ready to ad minister the treatment, the mothers pushed the boys forward, but the others held back. The physicians painted a preparation of nitrate o...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TERRIBLE AMERICAN TRAIN DISASTER. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 11 June 1914

TERRIBLE AMERICAN TWAIN DISASTER. A terrible railway accident oc- \ curred early on the morning of ( May 31, 1005, on tho Pennsylvania j Railway, near Harrisburg. Tho di saster was due primarily to ti de fect in the tubing of tho air-brake . on a fast freight train, travelling westward: I Tho tube burst, throwing several j the heavily-laden cars oft the \ line, and be/ore anything could be done the Philadelphia and New York , passenger express dashed into the wreckage. Some of the freight cars contained dynamite, and the force of the im pact caused its explosion, which shattered every carriage in the pas senger truin and reduced the freight to a complete wreck. Fire imme diately burst forth, and when tho flames reached the unexploded dy namite several terrific explosions completed the ruin. Many lives were lost, and the per sons who were pinned down by the wreckage shrieked in ngony ; but! little help could he rendered on ac count of the terror caused by the ! :onstant explosions, a...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
VIOLIN NOVELTY [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 11 June 1914

VIOUN NOVELTY The "conli'oviolin," the now musi cal instrmnent of Valentino de 7. or/j, seems ti> hnvo met with success in Italy. It lliin the shape of n double-sized viola, is held be tween the I:iiocs, and its four strings —K. A, I), and CJ—are tuned an oc tave below those of the violin. Its notes—e.\ce|»t a few only that are like those of the viola—are said to have a marked character entirely their own. 1431.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE GARDEN. ROSE MILDEW. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 11 June 1914

THE GARDEN. ▼ ROSE MILDEW. ! The New South Wales Bureau of Microbiology states that rote mil dew is caused by a fungus, Sphnero* thcca. It attacks the leaves, youn; shoots, and flower buds, often curl I ing the leaves. On the shoots, calyx, and fruit tho fundus forms t!.icfc. fclty patches that persist i ite int«' the season, awl here produces the small black bodies containing spores to carry it over till the a?xt year. Sometimes the disease m'curs in two stages — the first after the leaves are formed, and the second when tho young \vc»od has made growth and the flowers hive com menced to appear. This is tho criti ' cal period and the fungus prepares to carry, over the winter. Dusting flowers of sulphur mixed with third of its volume of lime chrcks the disease. Spraying with sulphuric ncid, one part in 1500 of water, is one of the best remedies. Care nn^ he taken in mixing or diluting *'*!• phuric acid. Put the water i"t<> an earthenware or wooden vessel, Pl,ur the aci...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CALVES AND TUBERCULOSIS. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 11 June 1914

CALVES AND TUBERCULOSIS. -f Evcrjone connected with J.irraiiu is now very keen on the subject <<( lighting tuberculosis iwimn; mir herds. It is pointed out, however, in a contemporary, that most of us are working from the wrong end altoge thcr. We are treating animals after they are attacked, and propositi); tu have them examined and slaught.rcil, whereas nothing is done at the otlur end, as it were, to brec<l animals free of tuberculosis. It is well enough known now that n calf from a tuber culous cow may be perfectly, healthy, and nearly nlways is to stirt with, and if we feed it on healthy mil;, and keep it away from tainted sur roundings, in ninety-nine cases out el a hundred it would grow up a cooi and healthy animal. The whole point, therefore, empha sises the fact that we shmiU set. about rearing our calves under proper conditions, and that we might in a short time bring forward hcrils which would be absolutely sound tu bnjin with, and these w...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
First Egyptological Museum. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 11 June 1914

First Egyptological Museum. No traveller to Egypt should miss a visit to the Cairo Museum, for it ' houses the largest nml most valu able collection of Egyptian anti quities in the world. One of the most imposing hnlls in this great museum is the atrium, where two colossal btatues of Ha rnesses II. and that of Amenhetop, J the sou of llapu, arc among the most prominent exhibits. I Here also is a colossal* group over 120ft. in height representing the ' king, Amenophis J If., his wife Ti.vi, ] and three daughters. This valuable j discovery belongs to the 18th dy nasty. It wns foumi in the \enrs 11)06-3, and brought to the mu seum in pieces. Expert hands put them together, and some missing parts were cleverly imitated. Among the heaviest and largest ornaments exhibited in the atrium are those of King Amrnemhet 111., while the shinfng object of polished black granite in the centre of the hall is the top of the pyramid of the same king. Heautifully chis soiled and engraved with hierogly ...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
How Performing Animals Learn their Tricks. A CHAT WITH A WELL-KNOWN TRAINER. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 11 June 1914

How Performing: Animals Learn their Tricks. ? A CHAT WITH A WFiLFj-KNOWN A TRAINER. Is if cruel to tcnch nnlinnls to perform tricks ? Mr. TIioiiwk Ilnrdy, tlio novelist, soys " Yes," nnil, in a recent letter to the •Times,' tells lmrron'itig stories of cii-mI skylarks poisoned l,y tliolr 1 roken-hearted mothers, n»d trainod dugs slnrvod Into submission. "These tiiles," said Mr. Fred Gin 1 lie well-known trnincr, In a rcoiit interview, "are absurd. No aiiimnJ can over be trained to per i",,ri,i n trick which it dislikes. On the contrary, it is the first object of every trainer to discover how niiinials play when at liberty, and to jiltempt to imitate these games in the performances lie devises. An animal which will not play is use less from the trainer's point of view. "I remember how I first (jot the idea of teaching a horse to walk the light-rope. I was in Jrelnnd, and happened to see n eolt passing along t'1" top of a very narrow bunk. I bought the animal and tried it with a two-f...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Train Seven Years Late. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 11 June 1914

Train Seven Years Late. + The ' llailway llagazirtc ' records the story of a trnin which rcnched its destination more than seven years behind time on a part of the Gulf and Interstate liuilway, now included in the Atchison, Topeku, and Santa i'e system. The train started from Beaumont, Texas, bound for Port Bolivar, at 11.30 a.m. on September 8th, 1900. The distance is seventy-one miles, and the train was duo iii Tort Bolivar at 1.55 p.m. It maintained its schedule for Iho first thirty-three miles to High Islnnd. There it was surrounded by waters from the Gulf of 31e.\ico, which had crcpt more than thirty-eight miles in land, and flooded the railway. When the waters subsided, the train was high' and dry on tlio prairie, the only rails left being those on which it stood. After -iiours of terror the passengers made their escape.through the mud. Eventually the road was rebuilt, and at last the rails con nected with those under" the long overdue train. At firsL it was pro posed to tow t...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"'WAY BACK." [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 11 June 1914

'"WAY BACK." t ■ Fate clinched the matter for me. Slio had set her face for wcokg against my desire to work, and I went farming to spite her'. Jackson kept a sheep farm "way back" in | (ho hills, and ho wanted a man. I wanted Jackson's money badly, so wc quickly came to terms. "Ride?" said Jackson. "A little," I said. "Start now ?" "Certainly." Twenty miles of steady jolting in an ancient coaoh brought us to M—, tho last littlo jjutpost of civilisa tion. At the wooden shanty they called an hotel we found horses and a good dinner. Jackson ato Bloodily until the limits of his ca pacity wero reached. Then ho sighed, as a nian\ sighs who is contcnt. "I am going up to Auckland," ho said ; "do you think you could find your way to my placo on your own? It's twelve miles up the Creek Hoad ; you can't miss tho way, there's only one, and you'll land bo foro dark. Tell Dave I sent you# The road's bad though/' he finished. "I'll manage it all right/' I re plied, in blissful ignorance of Jack so...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Indian Canoe. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 11 June 1914

The Indian Canoe. When the Canadian rcil mnn of the old kind wants to mnke a canoe he ' cuts a tree, preferably a cedar. or else searches for a fallen trunk nf the dimensions he requires. In ; either case he starts by cutting off the desired length, peels off the bark, and hollows out the log, leaving n ; smooth surface on the sides and j bottom from end to end. Nest : the log is turned and the outsit . fashioned to his liking. ! The lop is hollowed out by burn ! ing and chopping. A fire is built j on the top, and is so carefully , watched and so skilfully directed that when the. burning is finished the . big piece of timber is neatly hol lowed, with • wonderful symmetry, j from bow to stern. The whnlo ' concave surface is left so evenly ; and nicely carried that when it is i worked down to the sound timber | by the use of a buck-horn ndze, there remains but very little Alter ation to bo made before the canoc is fit for use. ; The log is now* turned over, with the hollow side down. ...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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