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Title: Corowa Chronicle, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 29,725 items from Corowa Chronicle, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Walbundrie Police Court. (Before Messrs. W. Schig and B. Odewahn, J's.P. [Newspaper Article] — The Corowa Chronicle — 21 February 1906

Walbundrie Police Court. (Before Messrs- W. Schilg and B. Odewahn, J's.P. John O'Dea was charged with using inflammable material, to wit, a tobacco pipe when alight, and wax matches within three yards of grass land at Walbundrie, whereby a quantity of grass, the property of Mr. Kiddle, of Walbundrie, was injured on 1st inst. Constable Osborne gave evidence of arrest and finding accused at his camp drunk, carelessly using a lighted pipe. The contention was that accused, when drunk at 10 p.m. on the night of the 1st inst., went through the paddock in question smoking aud caused the fire. A quantity of evidence was given of a very strong circumstantial nature, at the conclusion of which accused de nied all knowledge of the fire on oath, and stated, under cross exami nation, that his statements to the police on the night of the fire were not correct. Constable Osborne stated to their Worships the impossibility of bring ing correct evidence in such cases as the one before the court. A ve...

Publication Title: Corowa Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHAT WORRIED HIM. (Likewise What Didn't Worry Him a Bit.) [Newspaper Article] — The Corowa Chronicle — 24 February 1906

WHAT WORRIED HIM. (Likewise What Didn't Worry Him a Bit.) The sun's heat will give -rut in 10,000,000 years more,' And he worried about it. 'It will surely give out then, if it doesn't before,' And be worried about it. And some day the earth will fall into tbe suu,' And he worried about it. Just as sure, and as straight, as if shot from a gun,' And he worried about it. When strong gravitation unbuckles her straps. Just picture,' he said, 'what a fear ful collapse! It will come in a few million ages, perhaps,' And he worried about it. The earlh will become much too small for the race,' And he worried about it. When we'll pay thirty shillings mi inch for pure space,' And he worried about it. ?The earlh will be crowded so much, without doubt. That there'll he no room for one'« tongue to stick out, And no room for one's thought to just wander about,' And he worried about it. Just then the Ice Age will return, cold and raw, Frozen men will stand stiff, with anus outstretched in awe, As i...

Publication Title: Corowa Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
POVERTY A GREAT SCHOOL. [Newspaper Article] — The Corowa Chronicle — 24 February 1906

POVERTY A GREAT SCHOOL. Poverty often calls out taleutK which would never be discovered but for her. Not unusual opportunities, not ease and comfort, -not wealth or luxuries, but poverty has ever been the meat university of the race; and by far the larger number of successful graduates call her alma mater. What statesmen, what orators, what phllau rhroplsts, what scholars, what musi cians, and what artists have been grad uated from the halls! U ha6 not been the men favored by fortune, but as a rule, the poor boys with no chance, who have done great t liings. There is nothing else so fascinatiUK in history as the romance of achieve ment under difficulties — the story of liow men and women, who have brought great things lo pass, got their start, and of their obscure beginnings and triumphant ends, their struggles, lUeir long waitings amid want and woe, the obstacles overcome, the final victories; the stories of men and wo- ? men who have? seized common situa tions and made them great,...

Publication Title: Corowa Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A WORD TO YOUNG HOUSE-KEEPERS. [Newspaper Article] — The Corowa Chronicle — 24 February 1906

A WORD TO YOUNG HOUSE KEEPERS. Don't take up household duties unless you mean to go on with them regular ly. If you do a thing one day and omit to do it the next, you are uot to be depended upon. Have a definite day and definite time for all you do. The flower-vases must be attended to every day, the silver cleaned once a week, and part of a day kept for seeing to the household linen. Begin stead ily after breakfast and work until your tasks are done.. It you sit down 'just for a minute' with a book it is fatal. 'Our whole neighborhood has boon stirred up,' said the regular reader. - The editor of the country weekly seized his pen. 'Tell me all about it,' he said. 'What is the news? What stirred it up?' 'Ploughing,' said the farmer. Beautiful Widow: Do you know, 1 ;un forty years old to-day? Gallant Bachelor: Madam, to me you are just twenty. I never believe more than half of what I hear! Mrs. Clark: Who was that man you were bowing to at the gate just now? Mr. Clark: Oh, he's just ...

Publication Title: Corowa Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE HORSE. SHOEING FARM HORSES. By a Practical Horseman. [Newspaper Article] — The Corowa Chronicle — 24 February 1906

THE HORSE. SHOEING FARM HORSE6. By a Practical Horseman. A shoeing kit does not cost much when compared with Its value to a farmer. A shoe should not remain on a young or growing horse more than four weeks, nor on any horse more than elErht wppks Mnflf. fihnpfnevfltnltliK have several bad faults. Many farm ers insist on the smith earning his money, and want to see him trim the hoof down real thin, 'and do a nice job of rasping down the front of the boot.' Pretty soon the smith enters into the spirit of tbe thing, and, de spite tbe fact that he knows he is doing wrong, cuts away every bit of born, sole and frog that he possibly can without laming the animal. Keep the knife away from tbe bars and sole of tho foot, and any other further than to remove bits of detached or ragged horn, and never allow a rasp to touch the front of the hoof As a rule, too hear;- shoes arc used, and in a great majority of cases the nails used are much too large. I never use a nail heavier than No. 6 and nea...

Publication Title: Corowa Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
UNDER LOCK AND KEY. [Newspaper Article] — The Corowa Chronicle — 24 February 1906

UNDER LOCK AND KEY. Mrs. Crimsonbeak : ' I see a Liver pool woman has discovered a way of preventing her losing her hair.' Mr. Crimsonbeak: 'Indeed! And what doe* she do?' Mrs. Crimsonbeak: 'Locke it iu tlie safe.'

Publication Title: Corowa Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THOUGHT HE COULD. [Newspaper Article] — The Corowa Chronicle — 24 February 1906

THOUGHT HE OODLD. 'Could you do the landlord in- *e Lady of Lyons''' asked the manager , of a seedy actor. ' Well, I tliould think I might ; I nave done a good many landlords.'

Publication Title: Corowa Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
JUDGING BY APPEARANCES. [Newspaper Article] — The Corowa Chronicle — 24 February 1906

JUDGING BY APPEARANCES. The Pretty Girl : ' Miss Antique wa» named after ber uncle George, wasn't she?' The Spiteful Girl: 'I don't know; ; she looks as if she had been named .' before him.' ? : ' .

Publication Title: Corowa Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THEY WERE AGREED. [Newspaper Article] — The Corowa Chronicle — 24 February 1906

THEY WERE AGREED. Mother : 'You have accepted George ! Why, you know very well that I don't approve oi him.' Daughter: ' That's all right, mother. Neither does he approve oi you.'

Publication Title: Corowa Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SHE HAD TO SAY IT. [Newspaper Article] — The Corowa Chronicle — 24 February 1906

SHE HAD TO 8AY IT. ' What charming little pink-tipped ears you have. Miss Totlje ! Did you ever have them pierced?' Hies Tottie : ' No. But I have bad them bored.'

Publication Title: Corowa Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CONFORMATION OF THE DRAUGHT-HORSE. [Newspaper Article] — The Corowa Chronicle — 24 February 1906

CONFORMATION OF THE DRAUGHT-HOR8E, The up-to-date draught-horse Is one that stands dose to the ground, with short legs' and broad base. The feet are well apart, with space enough for another, toot of the same size to be placed between them. The back of this animal will be somewhat shorter than that of the speed-horse. It is with the hind legs that he propels himself, and thus it can be easily seen that, since the collar is on the shoel der, the whole weight of the loadjs, drawn by the back. Therefore itmii? be short, broad and well mnscled. The shoulder of this horse Is long and well shaped, so as to give a good base to the collar. It should be more nearly perpendicular than that of the speed animal. However, sloping shoulders are often found In our best draught-horses. Tbe hocks of thin horse will show rather a narrow angle, because It Is by this that a greater leverage is given, and he is able to move heavy loads. The body is mas sive, low set, ample, very muscular and cylindrical...

Publication Title: Corowa Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NOT SO BAD AS THAT. [Newspaper Article] — The Corowa Chronicle — 24 February 1906

JfOT SO BAD AS THAT; - ?? : 'If I were to die, Phil.whaVWbuJd ?.? you do? ' ? . .-??'-:', ? j , .' %. 'I should go crazy.' ,'~ ';? .-. -'...?.?'' ? -r; 'Would you marry again?' -?? ?'* . - 'Not much. I shouldn't be as crazy . as that.'

Publication Title: Corowa Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RIVAL SHOWMEN. [Newspaper Article] — The Corowa Chronicle — 24 February 1906

RIVAL SHOWMEN. The story of the origin of the part nership between' the circus-men Bar num and Bailey is as picturesque as the posters that subsequently an nounced their show. When Mr. Bailey headed the old firm of Bailey, Hutch Inson, and Cooper, their chief attrac tion was 'Gib, the elephant with two trunks.1' Gib was a wonder, the whole coun try was crazy to see nitn, and every where (he Bailey, Hutchinson, and Cooper show spread its tents they were crowded to their limit. Phineas T. Barnum did not like the tremendous success his rivals were having. Calling in bis secretary, be said In a thoughtful and puzzled way, 'Dan, did you ever see that Gib?' 'No, I never did see him,' replied Dan. 'Has he really got two trunks?' asked Mr. Barnum, in a speculative manner. 'Can't say tor sure, but they keep on saying he has, good and loud.' 'Dan,' said Mr. Barnum slowly, 'we've got to have that elephant.' And he reached for a telegraph blank, and sent the following message to Bailey, Hutchin...

Publication Title: Corowa Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Grave and Gay. [Newspaper Article] — The Corowa Chronicle — 24 February 1906

Grave and Gay. ' Yes, father, when I graduate I am going to follow my literary bent and write for money.' ' ? ? 'Humph, lny eon, you ouglit lo be. successful- That's all you did tlie four years you spent at college.'. Bragg: ' I was knocked senseless by a cricket ball two years ago.' The Boy in the Corner: * When, do ? you expect to get over it?' Tlie trouble with the uiuu who is al ways talking' about vliul lie'd do if he had lots of money is that he never has any. ? -?' ^ First Lawyer : ' Did you break Hie will?' Second Lawyer: 'Yes; and the heirs, too.' ' She always has two eon-ants in Her house,' said Mrr. Tumming. ' Huh ! so have v e, said Mrs. D. — ' One going, t'other coming.' Solomon Isaacs : ' Vel, doctor, if I've got to die, I die goutendet. lly life vas insured for tree tousand punds.' Doctor: 'I think, with the aid of ionics, I can keep you alive for a week longer.' Solomon Isaacs : ' Dond't do it, doc tar! Dcr bremiuui comes due der day afder to-morrow!' Travelling Man ...

Publication Title: Corowa Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DISCIPLINE AND DEATH. [Newspaper Article] — The Corowa Chronicle — 24 February 1906

DISCIPLINE AND DEATH. The sinking of the Japanese cruiser Tnlcasago was a heart-touching proof oi the heroic possibilities in human na- ture. In the teeth of a freezing gale the cruiser struck a mine, which blew a six-foot hole in Its hull. The water rushed in with tremendous force. No helii was in sight. The captain sum moned the crew. 'No one must leave the ship, he said quietly, 'until she sinks. We will share the fate of the vessel together.' There was no flinch ing. They sang their national an them, cheered their Emperor, and calmly, drawn up in due order, waited minute by minute until the ship went down. Nearly four hundred lives were lost. Tbe incident in naturally reminiscent of the Birkenhead, a British troop steamer, which, in 1852, was wrecked off tho Cape of Good Hope. After put ting the women and children into the boats tbe men formed on deck, and in full dress uniform, with colors flying, down went four hundred of them. The 'Birkenhead Drill' has become a watchword In ...

Publication Title: Corowa Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A SHOWER BATH. [Newspaper Article] — The Corowa Chronicle — 24 February 1906

A SHOWER BATH. It is all too common to misunder stand tlie true nature of a medicine, as any one must confess, remembering the story of tlie nurse irlio awoke lier pati ent in order to administer a sleeping potion. A certain doctor one day met a neigh bour and inquired: — 'Well. Jackson, bow did your \vifi- manage her new shower bath ?' 'Oil. she had very good luck. Mrs. Smith told lier how she managed with hern. She made an oiled silk hood, wilV a. big cape to it, that came down over her nhnulders.' ' She was an idiot for her pains.' said tlie doctor impatiently. ' That's not the way.' 'So my wife thought.' ? ' And your wife did nothing of the kind. I hopeP' 'Oh. no, no. My wife she used the nmhrelly.' Ho : 'I point out your faults becauw I lore you.' She: ' Nonsense 1 If you really lovnd me you would think my faults were ex cellences.' Gheut, iu Belgium, is built on 2* islands, which are connected ur 80 bridges. Six hundred and ten million herrings have been landed at Yarmouth and...

Publication Title: Corowa Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN ADVENTURE WITH A COBRA. [Newspaper Article] — The Corowa Chronicle — 24 February 1906

AN ADVENTURE WITH A COBRA. Tales of tiger-shooting In India are common enough, but one does not hear much about king cobra-hunting. A traveller tells how, accompanied by, two natives, he went to a spot when a pair of king cobras were known to be. On arrival at the place he was put for safely under a basket, to the for holding it down, and the meshes of which were too small for a king cobra to put its bead through. While be was beneath this basket one of the snakes came out and was shot with arrows by the natives. The other cobra then appeared, and en deavored to overturn the coop. Describing the incident, the writer says: 'The terror of that moment I cannot express. What if it should overturn tho basket? The strength of thirteen feet of muscle must be enor mous, and if used In the right direc tion would soon overcome my pull at the cord. What would then happen? Certain death for me, I felt sure. -'A'gaJn tile whiz of en arrow, and I saw 'a ?gaping wpund along the neck of the Tierce ...

Publication Title: Corowa Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
POLLY AND THE TRAMP. [Newspaper Article] — The Corowa Chronicle — 24 February 1906

POLLY ANU THE TRAMP. 'Yes, Polly is a pretty bird, and as bright as she is pretty,' fcaid Aunt Abbie to us children, who crowded about the cage to admire the bird's bright plumage and pert manners. ' Did I ever tell you,' she asked, ' how Polly did we a good turn by frightening a tramp awayP' ?'No, Aunt Abbie,' we all cried, and wo gathered about her, anxious to lose no word of the story. 'Well, children,' she began, 'you kuow Uncle Daniel has lived with me for years. As lie is old and feeble, he stays in the sitting-room and reads or steeps most of tho time. When he is wanted I go to the door and call rather loudly, for he is hard of bearing, 'Uncle Dan, Uncle Dan, you aro wanted.' Polly has beard these words so many times that she can repeat them a: plainly as I can, and when anything un isual is going on she will scream, ' Uncle Dan, Uncle, Dan, you are want ed,' but I never imagined this habit of Polly's would be of any service to me. 'One morning last summer I was alone in the ...

Publication Title: Corowa Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HIS CUSTOMER HIS EMPLOYER. How a Clerk Kept His Temper and Thereby Succeeded in Life. [Newspaper Article] — The Corowa Chronicle — 24 February 1906

HIS CU8TOMER HIS EMPLOYER. How a Clerk Kent His Temper and Thereby Succeeded in Life.' One of the most' prosperous mer chants in London had his life changed by a simple performance of duty. He was an assistant in a large drapery establishment at a small salary. He always tried to effect a sale. One day a customer appeared who was more than particular about his purchase. In relating his experience with this man the merchant said: 1 have a quick temper, and at times during the transact ion I felt that 1 could strangle the customer; but I quickly curbed my temper and went at him tooth and nail. J felt that niy reputation as a salesman was at stnke, and it was a question of conquer or be conquered. At last I made tho, sale, and with it came a great satisfaction; but I was not done with the man yet. I wanted to sell him mom. He said something about sending his wife along to look at some dress material. I promised to send samples of new patterns as they arrived. The custo mer thanked me a...

Publication Title: Corowa Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
KITTY KNEW ABOUT SHEEP. [Newspaper Article] — The Corowa Chronicle — 24 February 1906

KITTY KNEW ABOUT SHEEP. Seven sheep were standing By the pasture wall. ''Pell me,' said {he teacher, - To her scholars small, '.'One poor sheep was frightened, Jumped, and ran away, One from seven— bow man; Woolly sheep would stay?' Up went Kitty's fingers — A farmer's daughter she, Not so bright at figures As she ought to be. 'Please, ma'am'— 'Well, then, Kitty, Tell us, if you know.' ' Please, if one jumped over, All the rest would go.'

Publication Title: Corowa Chronicle, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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