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Title: Western Mail Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 1,028,759 items from Western Mail, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Dangerous Medicine. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 10 April 1886

Dangerous Medicine. Young Physician (to patient)-.* Did you follow ray directions in taking the little pills -one every three hours ?" Patient-" Well-er-you see, doe-" Young Physician-" Great Heaven Î You didn't take them of tenor than that ?" . Patient-"I didn't take any. My little hoy got held of the bottle in the night and ate them all up.4' Young Physician (hastily)-" Where is the boy ?" Patient-" The last I heard of him he was out in the back yard stoning cats.

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 10 April 1886

Contributions and Notes on Temperance work in the colony and elsewhere will be thankfully received. Address, "Tem- perance," Western Mail office, S George's Terrace, Perth. I. O G. T. BOCK OF SAFETY LODGE, No 22. rHE above Lodge meets in the Bechabite Hall, Wellington Street Perth, every Monday, at 7-30 p.m. All who are interested in the Temperance Cause, and any Who are willing to join will be heartily welcomed. Initiation Fees-Males 2s Cd, FemaleB Is 6d. A meeting is open to .the public on the second Monday in each month at 8-30 p.m. Further information can be obtained from Bros. J. Veryard.S.D.. B. K.Bobertson L.D. ' or H. COLLIES, W. Secretary. FIDELITY LODGE. No. 41. THE Meetings of the above Lodge are held every Thursday Evening at 8 o'clock in the Wesletan Schoolroom, corner of William and Murray Street, Perth. Initiation Fees :-Males 3a, Females 2s. The OBJECTofthiB Association being the welfare of our fellow men we invite the assis- tance and co-operation of all'Who have th...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
The Garden. THE BULB GARDEN. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 10 April 1886

^^lll^i^tei^^^ THE~BULB"GÁBDÉÑ" (By Hortus.) Iubteaa of scattering the different bulbous plants all over the garden in beds and ¡shrubbery, as it is done in more temperate climates, it is better for West- ern Australian gardening to devote parts of the gardeu to bulb growing only. The bulbous plauts should be grouped accord- ing to their flowering season, and those that are sujmosed to be taken up soon after flowering must be kept separate from those which are to remain in the ground jfor a number of years. The blies, especially, should have separate treatment. They all require deep planting and a steady moisture, and, if well assorted, a liily «bed will produce its magnificent flowers for six months of the year. When a bed of Hyacinths, Tulips, Anemones, or Ranunculus is emptied, and the bulbs stored in dry sand, it should receive a good dressing of manure and be planted again with summer animals or other beddiug plants of summer growth. There is nothing more beautiful than a well ...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
THUBSDAY, APRIL 8. The Court resumed at the usual hour. STEALING A CARCASE. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 10 April 1886

THUBSDAY, APBJL 8. The Court resumed at the usual hour. Stealing a Carcase. . George Grant and Michael Byan-the latter of whom was lame and also alleged that he was deaf-were jointly charged with the larceny of the carcase of a sheep, belonging to Mr. William Osborne, butcher, on the 18th December last. There was a second count charging the prisoners with receiving the. sheep. The Crown Solicitor conducted the case for the prosecution. Neither of the prisoners were defended by counsel, and, as is usual in 6uch cases, the trial was inordinately pro- longed, by reason of the latitude allowed to the accused in cross-examining the witnesses. The Crown'Solicitor, in opening the case for the Crown, stated the foots of the case as it was proposed to be presented by the pro seoution. He said the offence was committed one evening about 10, o'clock, when Mr. Osborne's two carts come into town from the slaughter-house, one having seven and the other six carcases in it. Mrs. Osborne would tell ...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
MISSION ATTACKS. FROM THE WEST AUSTRALIAN [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 10 April 1886

MISSION ATTACKS. fbom the west australian *We regret being compelled to return 1 to a subject, which, at the present . jubcture, we should far rather leave alone, but it is impossible to allow rthe false and damaging statements re- garding our community, now being .assiduously circulated in the eastern . colonies, to pass without comment or remonstrance. Against the known v wishes of his chief, the Bishop of his diocese, Mr. Gbibblr published in this colony an elaborate attack upon Tthe Northern settlers, which-had it . even been all true and justified would have shown how totally unfit ' ted he was for the work of a Christian -missionary. Not content with this, he ¡jfjîpareutly contributed articles, - calculated to bring scorn and indigna- tion upon our colonists, to the South Australian Frees. And, now. a Mel* -bourne paper, the Daily Telegraph, has . reached us ii which, over Mr. Gbibble's . signature, appears a letter redolent of spite, and of what most people "would call " unct...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
THE PRICE OF REVENGE. A TRUE STORY. (FROM THE C. E. TEMPERANCE CHRONICLE.) [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 10 April 1886

THE PRICE OF REVENGE. " .-» A TRUE STOBY. By the Rev. E. H. Shepherd, M. A. (From the C. E Temperance Chronicle.) " Yes, sir, that's what I did : I cut off mv nose to spoil my face. I and the butler were engaged. We had been keeping company for sixteen years. He bad saved up eight hun- dred pounds, and I had saved up two hun- dred. He was good-looking, and could make himself very agreeable î so (as you may be- lieve) a good many lady's-maids and dress makerB in the neighbourhood were always after him. He used to say that he could have his pick of fifty young women, but that I came first amongst the fifty. " One afternoon my mistress sent me to carry a message to a house in the village. There I saw a strange man, who hod just come home, after serving his time in the army. We didn't exohange a word, but I could not help thinking, 'What an ugly man, and how he stares I* The next day I received a note from him, written on pink scented paper, asking me to marry him, and saying that he ha...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
Agricultural Information in Brief. (From our Exchanges.) [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 10 April 1886

Agricultural Information in Brief. (From our Exchanges.) Modern gardening is Bimply another term for improved methods of farming, and success either in the kitchen or market garden de- pends upon carrying out these principles. A man's farm is a volume, every acre of which is a page bearing the marks of his character, indicating the degree of mental and moral cnlture-to -which he has attained. The foliage of house plants may be bright- ened by the use of soot-a oupful to five or six quarts of water ; steep and cool, and water once in two weeks with the mixture. Cucumbers from old seed fruit better, and melon plants are shorter jointed and flower at the third or fourth joint, when from fresh seed they would not give a flower until the tenth joint. No hen should*be kept beyond her second laying season as a rule. Because many pay no heed to this point, but keep hens three, five, or more years, they wonder why they lay so badly. Some of the New York market gardeners keep small fires burn...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
Tail and Mane. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 10 April 1886

Tail and Diane. I Dr. Findlay, a New York veterinarian, gives the following treatment for making a horse's mane and tail grow, and for prevent- ing the hair from falling out :-Bubbing the mono and tail usually results from an un- healthy condition of the skin, which in most cases is produced by neglect of grooming, or by bad food, or by any change of diet from bad to good. Occasionally, however, it ap- pears in stables where grooming and food are unquestionably good. Damaged oats or hay are very ready causes for this annoying affec- tion. In every case, therefore, the food should be carefully examined. ' Young horses on coming into stables, sometimes suffer from irritation of tile skin, probably from change of diet. Horses recovering from fever fre- quently lose a large portion of the mane and tail. In the latter case it seems to arise from aa impoverished state of the blood. In regard to treatment, if any positive cause, Buch as damaged feod or neglected grooming, can be ascertaine...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
Phosphates in the Soil. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 10 April 1886

Phosphates in the Soil. In a lecture delivered at Invercargil New Zealand, Professor Black dwelt on the impor- tance of phosphates, and asked-Were they wisely using the available phosphates they had in the country P There was not much in the soil to begin with-lib. weight to the ton of good soil, and much ofthat was beneath the reach of plants-wheat, for instance. When 50 bushels of wheat whre sold in Lon- don a large quantity of the soil went with it, so that it was simply a mere question of cal- culation how many years it would take to make the soil utterly barren. The same thing applied to bullock Tearing. It was bet- ter for the soil to put full grown animals on the land than young ones. It was a mistake sending home the bones along -with the. frozen caroases of sheep. He deprecated the reckless way in which the sewage of cities as a rule was cast away into the sea. He thought it was owing tú their throwing away the phos- phates that the empires of old decayed and fell. The whol...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
S. Z. Harvest. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 10 April 1886

S. Z. Harvest. Says the N. Z. Times -.-Some weeks ago the prospects of this season's harvest seemed as badas possible, and it was feared that farmers would have .little tb reap. Things, however, have turned out much better than it was expected they would, and apparently the yield of .grain over a large part of the col- ony will not be very muoh below the average. Moreover, the deficiency'in quantity appears to be nearly compensated by the unusual ex- cellence of the quantity of the grain of all sorts. Generally in Otago the root crops are poor, and in many places they have absolute- ly failed. Turnip growing is the book bone of good.f arming, in Otago, and the poverty of this year's crop will be the cause not only of a limited supply of fat sheep for export, but the interruption to improvement of the land.

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
Mr. Parnell's Hotel Bill. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 10 April 1886

Mr. ParneU's Hotel QUI. A London correspondent says :-Mr. Far. nell's hotel bill for the week ending January 30 is stated to have exceeded ¿£300. This is a real grievance-to have to gather Irish money from the four corners of the earth only that it may find its way into John Bull's big pocket. It is said, and no doubt truly, that Mr. Parnells new followers are already quite enamoured of London life. The items of the bill would be delicious reading for the branches of the League at their next meet- ings. In their heartB the Parnellites must hate Home Bule, at least those of them that board at Westminster Palace Hotel.

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
A Poet's Fraud. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 10 April 1886

A Poet's Fraud. A French author, finding his reputation being impeded by the hostility of the critics, resolved to adopt a little stratagem to assist him in gaining fame and money in spite of his enemies. He dressed himself in workman's attire, and repaired to a distant province, where he took lodgings at a farrier's shop, where he did a little work every day at the forge and anvil. But the greater part of his time was secretly devoted to the composition of three large volumes of poetry and essays, which he published as the works of a journey- man blacksmith. The trick succeeded-all France was in amazement ; the poems of this " child of nature," this " untutored genius," this " inspired son of Vulcan," as he was now called, were immediately praised by all the critics, and were purchased by everybody. The harmless deceit filled the pocket of the poet.

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
The Wages Of Girls' Honest Toil. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 10 April 1886

The Wages Of Girls' Honest Toil. A large firm of Birmingham shopkeepers have recently been engaging female cashiers, andthetorma of the engagement will pro- bably interest the public and enlighten them as to the means by which some goods aro sold at a penny less than in other establish menés. These ¿ash-girls are to he at their desks at '8*45->m.l fined if late, «and not to leave them under any pretext whatever until I 8 p.m., under a penalty of as. 6d. Their meals they are to carry with them and con- sume at their defeka, Or go without. Any de I fioiehcy in cash to ¡be made good hy the cash- ier. On Saturdays ¿hey remain until 11 p.m. Now, you readers with consciences, fruess the remuneration-oh, you would realise its magnitude ! so here it is-5s per week, or six sevenths of a penny per hour for time, and nothing for responsibility. The Birmingham Owl, which reports these statements, calls on mothers to boycott such shops.

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
MELBOURNE TEA-TABLE TALK. MELBOURNE, March 24th 1886. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 10 April 1886

MELBOURNE TEA-TABLE 1ALK. _!-» Melbourne, Mareil124th 1886. It is just a fortnight since Bishop Moor- house left us. The pros and cons of his departure have been greatly discussed, especially by ladies who are always in- terested in clerical matters. Some people arc unkind enough to hint that Mrs Moor- house was the more ambitious of the two. Had the Bishop been a bachelor, they say, he would never have left us. The com- munity, as a whole,are a little disappoint- ed that Dr. Moorehouse could not have made up his mind to "live and die in Melbourne" as he distinctly promised to do. He explained away this remark of his, very cleverly, in his parting speech in the Town Hall,- but tiie words remain. Facts are stubborn things, and refuse to be explained away, even by so able a logi- cian as Dr. Moorhouse. The Bishop Was much attached to his horses and dogs. The great bull-dog that figured in the Melbourne Punch, two weeks ago, was his constant companion. At the sale held at Bishopscourt ...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
The Next Land Bill. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 10 April 1886

The Hext Land BUL The Daily Telegraph says :-Ireland's pre- sent condition is a very emphatic argument in favour of settling the land question before we enter upon the disoussion of Home Bule. The long struggle between the landlords and their tenantry has reached just now a very critical stage. The fall in prices, and the hard times generally, have induced many landlords to make large abatements; others have refused, influenced in some cases by a desire to " wring from the hard hands of peasants their vile trash by any indirection," but the landlords as a rule presB the tenants because they are pressed themselves. The difficulties in the way of a natural and proper adjustment arise because Mr. Gladstone has spoken «o vaguely on the Home Bule question that he has excited the wildest hopes in Ire- land as to a grand and glorious concession. It is believed that lie will make Ireland a nation again, and that, if the Whigs and Tories oppose him, he will appeal to the English people, «nd ...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
The Ladies' Page. [All communications tor this column should be written on one side of the paper only, and be addressed to HOUSEWIFE, WESTERN MAIL OFFICE, Perth. HOUSEHOLD. OUR HOMES. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 10 April 1886

JIsJ^E^Jä. [All communications tor this column should be written on one side of the paper only, and be addressed to Housewife, Westeen Mail Office, Perth. LBT A HOUSEWIFE.] | HOUSEHOLD. Oue Houes. How is it we ever 6ee au ugly house when there are so many ways in which to adorn it P In a house where there are a bevy of daugh- ters there is no excuse whatever for rooms being otherwise than beautiful. There is always one in the family who has an especial taste for painting. What scope there is for her brush nowadays in providing painted screens, painted mirrors, and other articles too numerous to mention ? Very little cost is necessary to thoroughly transform a bore looking room into a place of beauty. If there should be a scarcity of pictures their places con be taken by tastefully made brackets. A joiner will make some plain deal brackets for a very trifling sum, and these can have a vallance either in crewel, painting or ma- cramé work. Girls who work these things well ought to hav...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
He Realised His Danger. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 10 April 1886

He Re ¿Used His Danger. I " Jim Webster, did you hear Parson Bled aoe say in his sermon last Sunday whar de, chicken thieves war irwine to spend dar vaca- tion after dey had shuck demsefsob dis fleshy tabernacle ? " asked Uncle Mose. "I did hear dat ar sermon and I was mightily impressed wid it." "" Yer don't realise de troof ob it, Jim P " "YeB, I does realise it, Uncle Mose. I realise it bo much dat I has made up my mind to quit stealing chickens. From now on I let de chickens rest in peace jand turn all my 'tentions to turkeys and ducks." Texas Siftinget.

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
Gossip on Tea. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 10 April 1886

Gossip on Tea. Tea is the drink of the future. Coffee had the start in the race, but tea is overtaking it, and will eventually leave it far behind. Eng- land and Bussia, the two greatest powers of the old world, are almost exclusively tea drinkers. The Dutch once led the commerce of Europe ; they drank coffee, and sank sub seqently to a subordinate place. It is inte- resting to note the habits of nations in this particular. The consumption of coffee in England is, on an average, less than one pound per head ; in Holland each man, woman, and child absorbs twenty-one pounds, Belgium and Denmark consume over thirteen pounds a head, Norway nine pounds, and Sweden about the same quantity, while frugal France is content with less than three pounds. But the united States, no doubt owing to their large Scandinavian, Dutch, and Gor- man population, take nearly eight pounds per annum for every one of their 50,000,000 of people, though in some parts of the country tea has almost displaced it. ...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
An Old Lady's Perplexity. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 10 April 1886

An Old Lady's Perplexity. A Devonshire woman of mature age went into a chemist's shop and said to the assis- tant: "I've got a cruel bad cough, surely. Tve heerd that them Brown's bronchial troches are the things. Have 'ee got any ? " The assistant pointed to a small box on the counter, and said, " Yee, there they are." " How much is it P " was the inquiry. The price was paid, and the old woman took her departure. At night the assistant missed a I box of glycerine soap (three cakee.) A couple of days after she returned to the shop and said : "I want *ee to take back two of they things I had t'other day. I took one of 'em. It was ghastly hard to chaw and awful to swallow, but it cured the cough."

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
An Ugly Customer. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 10 April 1886

An Ugly Cnstomer. A wonderful fish is becoming numerous in Goose Lake, California. It has the power to fill itself with air until it becomes very much like a ball. Of evenings, about sundown, they may be seen playing on the surface of the water. They reflect all the colours of the rainbow, and when sporting over the lake are a good sight. A hunter, several weeks ago, saw a crane swallow one of these fish when in its normal condition, but before the crane got more than fifty feet up above the lake the fish had taken in enough air to explode the crane, which, at the sound of a report like that of a gun, flew all to atoms, and the fish came lightly down on the water, no worse off for a short ride in the air. The fish is a great curiosity, never having been found in other waters.

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
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