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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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THE WITNESS SCORED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

THE WITNESS SCORED.   To confuse a witness is generally an easy task,   and lawyers know no easier way than to make a witness explain the meaning of his words, know- ing that very few people can do so without get- ting excited. Occasionally a victim resents this nagging, and answers in a spirited and unexpected manner. A lawyer was cross-examining a young girl of rather haughty temper. She had testified that she had seen the defendant "shy" a book at the plaintiff, and the lawyer had seized on the word. "Shy!—shy a book! What do you mean by that? Will you explain, to the Court what the word 'shy' means?"   The girl leaned over the desk beneath the witness-box, picked up a law book and threw it at the lawyer's head, who dodged just in time. "I think the Court now understands the mean- ing of the word 'shy,' said the Judge, gravely, and the girl was allowed to finish her testimony without further interruption.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NO MORE RAILWAY COLLISIONS. ELECTRIC SIGNALS WHICH PREVENT ACCIDENTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

NO MORE RAILWAY COLLISIONS.     ELECTRIC SIGNALS WHICH PREVENT ACCIDENTS. A new and highly interesting system of pre- venting railway accidents has been invented by Herr Bartelmus, an Austrian electrician. Herr Bartelmus announced it at a recent sitting of the Austrian Railway Officials' Club. The in- ventor employs a single electric current in order that a stopping or moving engine may transmit signals to the stations and signal boxes, and vice versa. This invention, it is said, makes it possible to prevent accidents arising from trains meeting one another, from an express train running into the back of a goods train, or from leaving some carriages or trucks behind. The invention would further prevent one train colliding with another standing at the platform, or with a single truck or coach; likewise it would ob- viate accidents arising from opening the wrong points, or from the imperfect closing of them, to mention only the commonest causes of catas- trop...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Women in Business. HOW THEY COMPARE WITH MEN. A LARGE EMPLOYER PREFERS MEN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

Women in Business. HOW THEY COMPARE WITH MEN. —•— A LARGE EMPLOYER PREFERS MEN. (BY P. H.) The question "whether women as workers are   as valuable as men is one which arouses eternal   discussion. Point has been given locally to the   controversy recently by the claim of the new   woman that female labor should receive equal   pay with males for equal work.   The women who lead the advanced female   movement never hesitate to assert that women   can do anything a man can do; do everything   as well, and a great many things better. They   sometimes, but not always, exempt navvying   and coal-heaving. But they tell us women make   better clerks, more attentive post-office attend-   ants, better telephone operators, cleaner and   more skilful typewriters, as able doctors, as   capable dentists...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE NEW WALK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

THE NEW WALK.   —•— From time to time fashion is responsible for a new hand-shake, a new bow, and so forth, and now the new corset, in addition to bringing about a new figure, is also responsible for in- troducing a new walk, if it may be so termed. The tendency of the straight-fronted corset is, by keeping the hips back and allowing the waist more freedom, to give greater elasticity to the step, and to altogether improve the carriage. A tight waist, such as the old-fashioned stay brought about, is never accompanied by a free   step and movement, but the straight-fronted cor- set, which gives space instead of compression to the waist, is bringing in its train an army of women who, by holding their bodies in a more natural position, Walk with a greater grace and dignity than usual, with more springiness and less shuffle. The attitude of the body has, of course, an immense influence on the walk, and with the shoulders and hips well back, the gait must of nece...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOPEFUL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

HOPEFUL.   "Is this a poor parish?" inquired the stranger   of a deacon.   "Well," replied the deacon, "the parish is   rather poor at present, but the minister is en- gaged to a rich widow, and we are very hopeful."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE STROH VIOLIN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

THE STROH VIOLIN. This instrument, which represents five years of study and experimenting on the part of the inven- tor, Mr. Chas. Stroh, of 92 Albany-street, London, N.W., is not intended as an improvement on the violin, but is purely an instrument made on   scientific principles. The chief characteristics are simplicity of construction and purity of tone, whilst the volume of sound is equal to quite three violins. Its beautiful tone has been proved by the playing of the well-known violinist, Mr. George Collins, of the slow movement from Men- delssohn's Concerto, the harmonies being pro- duced clear and true (a difficult performance on ordinary violins)—says "Invention." The instrument consists of two parts, the body and the diaphragm, to which the resonator or trumpet is fixed. The body is in no way used in the production of sound, being used solely to hold the various parts of the violin together, and to sustain the enor- THE STROH VIOLIN.   mous pressur...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
COAL-MINE HEROISM. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

COAL-MINE HEROISM.   —•— A remarkable instance of a coal-miner's hero-   ism is reported from a North Wales Colliery.   Father and son (Welshmen) were recently   working together "down pit."   The son, who was small of stature, had oc- casion to crawl under an overhanging ledge of coal to fix a wedge, whilst the father stood, lamp in hand, watching him. Suddenly the ledge of coal showed signs of giv- ing way, and the father, going on hands and knees, managed to fix his back under it to sup- port it from falling. When the son had crawled out in safety, it was found that if the father shifted his position the coal would fall and crush him. The son at once summoned aid, and by fixing some wooden props succeeded in extricating him. The strain, however, proved too much for him, and he subsequently died from the effects of it.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO LEGALISE POISONING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

TO LEGALISE POISONING.   A remarkable petition has been addressed to the Second Chamber of the Saxon Parliament.   It begs that a law be passed giving a physician   legal powers to poison, at his own request, a   patient who is suffering from an incurable dis-   ease, and who wishes either to save himself use-   less suffering, or to end a life which he knows   would only be a burden to everybody around   him.   As the powers thus asked for would contra-     vene the law of the land, the petition committee   declined to lay the petition before the House.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Venturesome Girl. WHO FLIES A KITE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

A Venturesome Girl. WHO FLIES A KITE. Miss Almenia Rice is the first woman to soar   through space hundreds of feet above the earth,   tied to the base of an enormous kite.   In the trips that have been made, Miss Rice,   attired as a boy, stood in a small basket, which,   suspended from the kite, acted as a tail.   "I am going up in my kite half a mile to meet   Santos Dumont when he comes across the ocean   MISS RICE. next summer in his airship," she confidently as- serted to a representative of the London "Ex- press." "This is not an idle dream of mine. I know I can do it. I have already been up 200ft. high above the roofs of the business district of Boston this winter. "I have now had a kite and line made strong enough to carry me up 3000ft., or a little over half a mile." The wooden strips have been made 14ft. long,   running from the top to the bottom of the kit...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
IMPROVED HAY STACKER AND BUILDERS' DERRICK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

IMPROVED HAY STACKER AND BUILDERS' DERRICK. The sketch shows a novel hay stacker, pa- tented by Marvin C. Hutchings, of Bozeman, Mont. (U.S.A.). The derrick is held in place by two guy ropes, the upper ends of which are bifurcated for at- tachment to the ends of the derrick members. One guy rope is securely attached to the ground; the other is provided at its lower end with a weight, sufficiently heavy to draw the derrick back to its normal position whenever it is in- clined. The weight serves to bring the derrick back when the load has been discharged. This weighted guy rope passes over a friction roller, which, as shown in Fig. 2, is located in a slot formed in the head portion of an anchorage arm. The anchorage arm is supported by connected legs held to turn in a socket adjustably mounted, on the body portion of the anchor arm. By rea- son of this construction, the anchor arm can be carried to or from the ground in order to give the weight more or less drop. The socket in ques- t...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NOT WHAT SHE THOUGHT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

NOT WHAT SHE THOUGHT. Young Husband: "Don't you think, darling that it would spoil the curtains if I should smoke?" Young Wife: "You are the best and most con- siderate husband that ever lived, dear; of course it would." Young Husband; "Well, then, you'd better take them down."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Tattersall's Consultations. EXAMPLES OF GOOD FORTUN[?]. WHAT WINNERS DID WITH THE MONEY. HOW THE SWEEPS ARE DRAWN. II. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

Tattersall's Consultations.   EXAMPLES OF GOOD FORTUNE   WHAT WINNERS DID WITH THE   MONEY.   —•— HOW THE SWEEPS ARE DRAWN.     (BY AN OLD EMPLOYEE.)   II. Many of the winners of Tattersall's prizes have   made them the foundation of prosperous busi-   nesses, and one of the largest drug concerns in   Australasia was built up on capital so obtained.   Another large undertaking is an engineering   works, employing a vast number of hands, and   this business is the outcome of a win in "Tatt's."   An amusing story is told of one big prize-   winner. He was a member of the "force" here   and was on duty in Riley-street when he heard   of his "good fortune." He was so staggered at   the news, that dignity disappeared, and he fainted   away like ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
REASON STATED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

REASON STATED. The children had written compositions on the   giraffe. They were reading them aloud to the   class. At length the time came for little Willie   to read his. It was as follows:—   "The giraffe is a dumb animal, and cannot ex-   press itself by any sound, because its neck is so   long that its voice gets tired on its way to its   mouth."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AS THEODORA. MME. BERNHARDT OPENS HER NEW YEAR'S SEASON. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

AS THEODORA. MME. BERNHARDT OPENS HER NEW YEAR'S SEASON. Mme. Sarah Bernhardt opened her New Year's   season in Paris with a revival of Sardou's tra-   gedy, "Theodora."   Although the play is considered by the ultra-   critical to be a thin, irregular story, dealing   with the licentious and turbulent days of the   Roman Empire in the sixth century, the gor-   geous stage effects, and above all the wonderful   acting of Bernhardt in the title-role, held the   audience enthralled.   Theodora was a beautiful girl, the daughter   of a keeper of the menagerie to the circus   under Justinian, who had risen to become the   Emperor's wife. She secretly loves, and is loved by, Andreas, a   Greek, who, ignorant of his inamorata's identity,   is head of the revolution against Justinian, and &...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Parisian Novelty. THE GREAT WATER TANK AT THE NIVEAU CIRQUE, PARIS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

A Parisian Novelty,   THE GREAT WATER TANK AT THE   NOUVEAU CIRQUE, PARIS.   The Nouveau Cirque is the only place of amuse-   ment in Paris where it is possible to present nau-   tical spectacles, and, since its organisation by   M. Zoller in 1886, it seemed to have exhausted   pretty much everything capable of interesting   the public in this order of amusement until a   couple of years ago. At this period, M. Houcke,   the director, found a subject, which, although not   new, served as a pretext for a very interesting   stage setting. It was a question of exhibiting to   the spectators a fish-man, or, rather, a diver, who   remained under water as if he were at home in that element. Good divers are not very rare. Those are considered very good who remain under water for two minutes, but some have been ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW RUSSIA HOARDS UP GOLD. FOR FUTURE EMERGENCY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

HOW RUSSIA HOARDS UP GOLD. FOR FUTURE EMERGENCY. Five billion dollars in gold is missing from the world's coffers. It is known that this extra amount of gold has been produced, but the most expert handlers of facts and figures have not been able hitherto to say to a certainty what has become of it. Recently, however, a theory in regard to the missing billions has been suggested—in the American press! In the treasure chests of Russia's war fund, it is said, is the money that some day will enable this great nation to dic- tate to the worrd. And this suspicion is the result, not of idle surmise, but of confidences made to an American by a Russian official, whose grandfather was minister to Alexander I. It was this grandfather, the Russian official claims, who originated the scheme upon which Russia has now been silently working for three quarters of a century. "Russia," said this official recently, "is proceeding on safe lines. Her progress may seem slow, but it will sooner or later pa...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AT THIS TELEPHONE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

AT THIS TELEPHONE.   A lady one day called up her husband at his office to say that the Smiths had just telephoned asking them to dinner. "Is it worth while?" she inquired of her spouse. "Yes, it is quite worth while," came back the unexpected answer from her would-be hostess, who had not been "cut off."   —"Tatler."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO THE MAN ABOUT FORTY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

TO THE MAN ABOUT FORTY.         The man who has a message worth delivering only begins to grasp the meaning of life at 35. Until 30, the active human mind as a well vitalised body is merely a combination of urgent, unreasoning brain cells, contending one with another. Few of us know what we want, or why we want it, what we mean to do, or how we mean to do it, before 30. We only know we are longing and striving and seeking. It is only a very crude, the wholly undeveloped being, however, who rests under this delusion. The worth while man soon awakens to the fact that he has merely left life's kindergarten at 30—and is ready now to enter the graded school. He is rid of some foolish notions, he has out- grown some toys. He is ready for real study. By 35 he has just come to know how little he knows, how much remains for his learning. His powers of enjoyment are keener, his ideals are higher, his strength is greater than before. He is al...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The World's News. A RECORD OP NOTABLE EVENTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

The World's News. A RECORD OF NOTABLE EVENTS. Issued from the office of "The Daily Tele- graph," Sydney, and available every Saturday morning at all newsagents throughout the Commonwealth — One Penny per copy. Communications intended for publica- tion should be addressed to the Editor. Business communications should be ad- dressed to the Manager of "The World's News." 147 King-street, Sydney.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE WEEK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

THE WEEK.   Australia has an interest in the British Japanese treaty, too, but it is not precisely that which our friends in Britain desire to attribute to us. We have not much appre- hension of armed invaders from the Far   East coming to our shores in ironclad fleets   to force a landing and to annex our terri-   tory. The danger we have sought to guard   against is of a different kind, the influx of quiet, harmless, industrious             thrifty Asiatics, who, with many of the qualities of good citizens, would be unable to assimiliate them- selves to our civilisation, and would remain an alien, heterogeneous element in our population. We do not ask that the treaty should operate to guard us against such incursions. What we want to know is will it operate to prevent us from guarding ourselves? It is significant that simultaneously with th...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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