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Title: Cobar Herald, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 51,568 items from Cobar Herald, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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SOMETHING ABOUT MARS AND THE MARTIANS. A Light Article on a Heavy, Subject. [Newspaper Article] — The Cobar Herald — 9 December 1899

SOMETHING ABOUT MARS AND THE MARTIANS. A Light Article on a Heavy Subject. Earth is the third planet from the sun, and then comes Mars, 35,000,000 miles from us, about which there is so much speculation and discussion. It is placed well for observation, and, in con- sequence, we know more about it than any other celestial body but the moon. Mars is farther away from the sun than the earth, and so receives only one third of the sun's heat that we do. There is an atmosphere enveloping the globe, and its ruddy oolour is by same said to be due to it. The surface of Mars is clearly divided into areas of bluish green and reddish ochre in colour. Until recently these have been supposed to be the divisions of land and water, but now Lowell, the celebrated .American astronomer, be-   lieves that Mars has no seas, and consists   entirely of land. In his opinion Mars is a much older planet than Earth, and the oceans have dried up by reason of the water passing through...

Publication Title: Cobar Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Telegrams. The Budget. SYDNEY, FRIDAY. [Newspaper Article] — The Cobar Herald — 9 December 1899

Telegrams. The Budget. SYDNEY. Friday. The Premier delivered his Budget speech yesterday. It is estimated that the expenditure for the current year would be £10,029,000; revenue   £9,809,000 which left a deficiency of £220,000 to meet this shortage. He (Mr. Lyne) proposed to wise the Stamp Duties, from which he ex pected to get£70,C00 forthe half year. Ho also intended to ask Parliament to sanction the issue of £1,000,000 worth cf short-dated Treasury Bills. Pond ing tho authorisation of this issue, he bad arranged with two local banks for an advance of £850,000 to meet the pressing liabilities which should have been meet last year. He assorted that the colony hnd been living on bor rowed trust funds for a considerable number of years. He did not intend to go to the Customs House for ad ditional revenue. Owing to the state of the finances he would only be able to increase the road vote by £20,000. Mr. Heid replied vigorously and sar castically. He congratulated the Go v...

Publication Title: Cobar Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Ivory that Grows on Trees. [Newspaper Article] — The Cobar Herald — 9 December 1899

Ivory that Grows on Trees. It is a mistake to suppose that all ivory comes from, the tusks of the elephant and other animals ; as a matter of fact, the greater part of it comes from the fruit of the palm-trees that grow in South America. If a man could only cultivate those trees in Australia, he could turn his back-garden to good account. Of courso the ivory does not grow in the form of a tusk. The fruit of the tree contains ..Huts, having a copious supply of albumen, which in edible when young, but aftorwardB becomes exceed ingly hard and white, bearing so strong a rosemblanoe to ivory, that only an export could tell the difference. Nearly all knife-handles that are sold as ivory are made from those nuts. Sculptors in ivory — Bmall goods, Buch as miniature heads—procure the nuts when they are young, carve them out roughly, and allow them to harden. This aaves a good many hours of labor.

Publication Title: Cobar Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CHURCH OF ENGLAND. [Newspaper Article] — The Cobar Herald — 9 December 1899

CHURCH OF ENGLAND. Cobar at 7.30 p.m., Rev. A. R.   Martin.

Publication Title: Cobar Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Tree Foil of Poison. [Newspaper Article] — The Cobar Herald — 9 December 1899

A Tree Full of Poison. Most people have at least heard the story of the deadly upas-tree of Java, of which it was at one time said that to merely approach it was certain death. This story was treated as an absolute fablo, but now it seems us if there was actually somo basis of real fact for it. The upas-troe is a roal treo, and a very big one. In the old trees the bark is over an inch thick, and full of a thick milky juice, tho merest touch of which upon tho Bkin produces a moat painful and irritating rash. What is more, a gas arises from this juice which has a most poiaonous effect upon anyone near it. It is sometimes used by the natives for aatiafying private revenge, for a oup oi it hidden in the room of a sleeper produces Btupor and eventually death.

Publication Title: Cobar Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Sunday Church Services R. C. CHURCH. [Newspaper Article] — The Cobar Herald — 9 December 1899

Sunday Church Services R. C. CHURCH. Sunday— Cobar, Mass at 7.30 and 10 a m , Benediction at 7.30 p.m. Rev. Father Treacy.

Publication Title: Cobar Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Presbyterian. [Newspaper Article] — The Cobar Herald — 9 December 1899

Presbyterian. About 120 persons attended the Presby-   terian service in the Masonic Hall on Sun-     day evening. The Rev. Joseph McDowell preached an eloquent and most interesting sermon, taking for his text one of the utter- ances of the Apostle Paul. — 'By the grace   of God I am what I am' Mr. Edgar Wood presided at the organ. Mrs. McDowell sang a solo very nicely. After the service a num- ber of Presbyterians remained behind, at the invitation of Mr. McDowell, to discuss Church matters. Mr. McDowell said his intention was to visit Cobar monthly and if the Presbyterians thought themselves strong enough a Church might be established here. The suggestion was heartily received. All the gentlemen present were then formed into a committee to go further into the matter. Mr. Ben Loyd was elected secretary and Mr. S. R Wood, treasurer. The matter will be thoroughly gone into and a Cobar 'kirk '     in now wit...

Publication Title: Cobar Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BILL-STICKERS CASE. [Newspaper Article] — The Cobar Herald — 9 December 1899

Bill-Stickers Case. Satharady Edderockman Collou   proceeded against Geo. Simmons on a charge of maliciously injuring eleven bill posters, the property of Heyde Todman & Co. Mr Hogan appeared for complainant and defendant con- ducted his own case. After lengthy evidence for both parties, the Bench imposed a fine of 1s, 10s, damages, 4s 10d cost of court, and £2 2s professional costs, in default of payment two month's imprison- ment. Walter McGroder, on bail, pleaded guilty to being drunk. Fined 10s or three days. Accused was then charged with offending against decency. Pleaded guilty and was fined 10s, or seven days.               James Barry pleaded guilty to being drunk. Fined 5s or imprisonment till the rising of the court.  

Publication Title: Cobar Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Latest London, Thursday. [Newspaper Article] — The Cobar Herald — 9 December 1899

Latest London. Thursday. Tho Australian and Canadian   contingents form to separate brigade   under Lord Methuen, J. B. Robinson, tho South African millionaire, considers the Boers are weak, and that tho war will soon end. Large numbers are moving home wards from before Ladysinith. The latter garrison is excited, The men cheered at tho prospect of oarly relief. Tho rations are reduced, and siokness is prevalent. The Boers are bombarding the wes tern defence at 4000 yu.rds with 8 heavy guns. General Joubert is under medical treatment at Volkstad, and is replaced by General Burger. Goneral Buller believes that tho Boors do not admit one-tenth of thoir losses. Major Scott-Turner is unable to ro tnin the enemy's laager at Kimborley in tbe face of heavy Boer reinforce ments. ? . Turner died from the effects of his wounds. General Joubert had a survey made of the country from the Natal frontier to Pietormaritzburg last spring. The Pretoria mint is coining one hun...

Publication Title: Cobar Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WAR! London Sunday [Newspaper Article] — The Cobar Herald — 9 December 1899

WAR! London Sunday Tho British casualties at the battle of Modder River were 488. Pontoons have been despatched from Durban for the Tugela River.   Additional detu'.is of the batMe of Graspan show that the Hoer ar illery did splended work, so accurately measuring tho ranges that they hit a muviiig armoured tram. Tho Ninth Lancers chased 200 Boors who wore under the shelter of kopjes. Severe infuntry iighting occurred over throe miles of kopjes. The Marines bore tho brunt of the final attack, losing 91 out of 215 mon engaged. The cavnlry, exhausted by their efforts, were unable to pursue the retreating Boers. The N.S.W. Lancers charged a party of Boers, who were endeavour ing to t!3cape, and drove thorn back. The Boers attempted to destroy tho Tugela Bridge, but were gallantly defeated. Lord Methueu has telograpted to the Quoen that the wounded British are recovering satisfactorily. The Queen feels acutely the o&s of so many brave soldiers, esp icially those belo...

Publication Title: Cobar Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
That Small Boy Again. [Newspaper Article] — The Cobar Herald — 9 December 1899

That Small Boy Again. About the time of the autumn sales we opened a new stationer's shop, and sent the news broadcast that we would give the first customer a valuable present on the opening morning. Hours before the shutters were lowered there was seen an old woman clutching like grim death at the door handle. Just as the clock struck the appointed hour, and the crowd com- menced to sway violently, a small boy popped round the corner and shouted, ' They are opening at the back!'   On hearing this, the crowd made a mad rush to the back. Imagine every one's dismay, and especially the old woman's, when, on returning from their wild-goose chase, they found the shop open, and the small boy isBuiug there from with the preaont.

Publication Title: Cobar Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Lady Was Satisfied. [Newspaper Article] — The Cobar Herald — 9 December 1899

The Lady Was Satisfied. Travelling on a Welsh railway that zigzagged up steep hillsides and wriggled about among precipices, an old lady asked the guard if there was any fear of an accident. 'Plenty of fear, madam,' he said,, 'but no danger.' ' Why so ?' ' 1 Because there is a brake to every. wheel.1 'But supposing the brake went wrong ?' queried the old lady, ' Then we can reverse the engine, and prevent the train going up or down.1 'But supposing that failed, what would become of us?' 1 That, madam,' finally said the guard, 'depends on the lifo you have led.'

Publication Title: Cobar Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Mining Story. [Newspaper Article] — The Cobar Herald — 9 December 1899

A Mining Story.   A young man returned home a few days ago from a trip to Johannesburg for his health, and, in narrating his adventures, he told about buying a silver mine for £3,000. 'I knew they'd rope you in!' ex-   claimed the old man. ' So you were ass enough to buy a humbug mine.' ' Yes ; but I didn't lose anything. I formed a company, and sold half the stock to a man for £7,000.' ' Y-you did 1' gasped the old man, as he turned white. ' I'll bet I'm the one who bought it.' 'I know you are,' coolly observed the young man, as, ho croBnod. his logs, and tried to appear very much at home, .

Publication Title: Cobar Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Schoolroom Idyl. [Newspaper Article] — The Cobar Herald — 9 December 1899

A Schoolroom Idyl. 'Teacher, I cannot answer that question.' ' Robert, your reasons for .this sur- prising refusal to answer me ! Did Thomas Jones throw that marble?' It was a thrilling moment. Across his desk the tall, powerful master glared sternly at the pale, determined face of the little fellow . before him. From their seats the scholars watched the scene with bated breath. An in vestigative youth in the, back of the room dropped a pin, and was frightened nt the noise it made. The big green fly stopped buzzing against the window pane. The boughs of the old elm beside the door ceased their rustling to catch the brave, boy's answer. At last it came. The noble little fellow burst into tears. 'I don't want to,' he sobbed, ' 'cause Tommy Jones says if I blab on him, he'll knock de sluffin! outer, me.' At last 1 That terrible servant-girl, has de parted.. As the young couple viewed the,.wteck,'-in the china closet. they, were speechless with dismay. The only thing, left unbrpke.n. wa...

Publication Title: Cobar Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Days of Danger. [COPYRIGHT.] Thrilling Narratives of the Bushranging Times, True Till Death. In Seven Parts.—Period, 1845. PART I. [Newspaper Article] — The Cobar Herald — 9 December 1899

Days of Danger. [Copyright.] Thrilling Narratives of the Bushranging Times. True Till Death.                     By Captain Lacie. In Seven Parts. Period, 1845.   PART I.   The beautiful river Derwent, of ?which Tasmanians'afe sojustly proud, practically lakes its rise in the long sheet of. water called Lake St. Clair. This lake is nearly. ten miles long, by about -four- broad, and it is most romantically siiuated. At either end rise up two remarkable peaks in the most abrupt manner, while to the west of.thesethe;long St. Clair Range runs almost parallel with the Eldor. Range, and nearly joins the great Rugged Ranges- to the north. The whole country is a land of mountains, rivers, and lakes, and even in the 'Nineiits' many parts of it have never been trodden by a white man. The source of the Derwent ,is , an. elevated lake, thoug...

Publication Title: Cobar Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ALLEGED STEALING. [Newspaper Article] — The Cobar Herald — 9 December 1899

Alleged Stealing.   George Hamilton and Francis H. Johnson, on remand, were charged with stealing in company the sum of £10 from Patrick Q'Neil on the 29th     November. Mr. Hogan defended the accused. George Hamilton said he had drinks with O'Neil at Wrightville on the day in question. Again saw him in the evening at McAppion's Hotel, and had drinks with him. Went over to Riley's Hotel with O'Neil, and left him shortly after. Saw O'Neil go away with someone about 9 o'clock, but it was not Johnson. Never took any money from him. After a lengthy cross-examination   by Sergeant Cameron, both accused were committed, by the Bench, to stand their trial at the next Court of Quarter Sessions, to be held on the 31st January. Bail was allowed,   self in £80, and two sureties of £40 each.    

Publication Title: Cobar Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A COUNTRY OF THE LITTLE. [Newspaper Article] — The Cobar Herald — 9 December 1899

A COUNTRY OF THE LITTLE. Japan is a country of the little. The men here are from 5ft. to 5ft. 5in. high, and the women are smaller. Notwithstanding the faut that they raise themselves 3in. from the ground on their wooden sandals, a fair-sized English girl towers above them like an Amazon. tiupuuese trees are uwarieu, ana, in fact, all Nature seems to be made in miniature. The chinkens are nearly all ban tams, und tho cats, with their bobtails, look like kittens comparod with ours, and the horses are ponies. Tho houses of the poorer people have but ono Btorey, and the1 rooms look like those of dolls' houses. The country, though big enough, is pretty rather than grand, and you have beautiful bits rather than sublime landscapes. It is the same with everything. A cap of tea at a little wayside tea house is handed to one in a little piece of shell-like china no bigger than an egg-cup, and the littlo Japanese beuuty goea down on her knees when she bringa it.

Publication Title: Cobar Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE MATCHMAKING DUCHESS. [Newspaper Article] — The Cobar Herald — 9 December 1899

THE MATCHMAKING DUCHESS. Perhaps the most successful matchmaker of her time, and assuredly one of the greatest of her kind the world has known, was Jane, Duchess of Gordon, an ancestress of the pre- sent Duke of Richmond. In other ways also was 'Matchmakin' Jeannie,' as she was   nicknamed, remarkable, for to her ability as a recruiter England owes that fine regiment, the Gordon Highlanders. ' Matchmakin' Jeannie ' was born at Monreith, in Wigtown, the daughter of a country laird named Maxwell, of long des- cent but scanty patrimony; and shortly after her birth, in 1750, her mother and father separated, the former settling down in rather poor lodgings off the High-street, of Edin- burgh. Edinburgh life was somewhat primi tive in those days, und the tradition Btill obtains that Jeannio Maxwell, the future duehcas, was wont to gallop up nnd down the High-street on the back of a fat pig, to the great delight of her neighbours. Deftly did Jeannio Muxwellcaat the mutri monia...

Publication Title: Cobar Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TNE RING AND ITS MEANING. [Newspaper Article] — The Cobar Herald — 9 December 1899

THE RING AND ITS MEANING. At this season of tho year the thoughts of   the maids and youths turn chiefly to one piece of jewellery— namely, tho ring. But few know how much the ring mean?, nor how it has been used, both for love and warfare, since the earliest ages. From tho king to tho peasant it is used as an emblem of faith. Tho king's signet is as important as his crown, for with it he is wedded to his kingdom. It not only waa an emblem of bethrotal and marriage, but it was, placed upon thn finger of her who bocaine tho brido of the LliJrch.and on tho finger of the widow who wus ' espoused to God.' The gladia tor's ring was a huge affair, made of iron or carved out of stone. It was not a beautiful piece of workmanship, and on the hand of a man fighting for his lifo it became a formid able weapon. The ' knocker-ring ' waa quaint and was generally made of brass or iron. It was used to knock on the house doors for admittance before elcctricbells were ever dreamt of. The...

Publication Title: Cobar Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A SNAKE IN AN UMBRELLA. [Newspaper Article] — The Cobar Herald — 9 December 1899

A SNAKE IN AN UMBRELLA. A very alarming adventure recently befell an English lady Sunday-school teacher in Natal, South Africa, which however, happily did not prove fatal.     A few weeks ago when attending the " school-house," as it is called in Africa, she left her umbrella standing in this hall. When the afternoon's service was over, and she was about to return home, she picked up her um- brella, but noticed that it felt unusually heavy. The lady was about to thrust her hand in to open it and discover the cause of its unusual weight, when the head of a snake suddenly appeared. In great alarm she threw the umbrella on the ground, and called to the young men who were trooping out from the school-house. They soon despatched the snake, when it was discovered that it measured no less than eight feet in length, and that its bite was one of the moat fatal description. Had the lady put her hand into the closed umbrella, she would undoubtedly have been fatally bi...

Publication Title: Cobar Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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