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Title: Mortlake Dispatch Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 19,644 items from Mortlake Dispatch, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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SHARE YOUR ROSES. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 30 May 1914

SHARE YOUR ROSES. A tourist brings this pleasant story about Andrew Carnegie from Scotland: At Skibo Castle Mr. Carnegie had a beautiful, rose garden. There were thousands of red and white and yellow roses always1 blooming there, and the villagers were free to saunter in the garden paths to their heart's content. One day the' head gardener waited upon Mr. Carnegie. "Sir, I wish to lodge a complaint," he ventured. "Well?" and the master waited. "Well, sir, I wish to inform you that the village folks aro plucking the roses in your rose garden. They are de nuding your rose trees, sir." "All," and there was a note of deep satisfaction in Mr. Carnegie's voice, "so my people aro fond of flowers, are they, Donald? Then you must plant more!"

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HANDLING CANADA'S WHEAT CROP. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 30 May 1914

HANDLING CANADA'S WHEAT CROP. Conditions (says "The Sydney Stock and Station Journal") have never been so good for handling the Canadian grain crop at the head of tlio Lakes. By thj close of navigation there will ho no less than 40.000,000 bushels stor age capacity at Fort Williams and Port Arthur, ivhioh' is 12,000,000 bush els more than last year. The new Government-owned elevator is now completed, and the machinery will be ready to handle its share of the com ing season's crop.. It has a capacity of three-quarters , of a million bushels in' the workhouso' and two and a. , hali millions in the storage bins." In fact, there is room for elevator spr.ee ol sorao 30,000,000 bushels. In addition to the Government elevator, the Can adian Pacific Railway, Grand Trunk Pacific, and Canadian Northern, to gether with the Fort William Eleator Company, and other concerns, are erecting new buildings, so _ that the total increase in storage facilities this year will be about 12,000,000 bushels. ...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 30 May 1914

invigorating and Sustain i ng Power of Is amply verlflea by capabie authorities. Harrison, San Miguel rnor. LTD.. COM. MERCHANTS, AND SUPPLY HOUSE FOR Bre-Aers, Aerated Water Manufacturers, Hotel Keepers, Bakers, ami Refreshment Rooms. Correspondence Invited on All Ar'.Uos used in the above trades. . Note Address 304 FLIuDERS STREET, MELBOURNE. STADATSO PERMANENTLY COKES Hydatid*. Uvtr and Kidney TrouUtec Guati-ls; Vice:*, Itjtcmtf! - OroirlW. SJS «cd 5/g per IxittlA. Cb«ai«t» Stores. S. A. PALMER, LS9 FLINDERS LANE, MEL BOURNE. FOOTBALL ACCESSORIES ARE BEST BOUGHT HERE! HARTLEY BROS., the Victorian Sport ing Centre, Supplies t!i<- BUST I'OOT BALLS ut tlie Lownst I'usnilile Vrlccs. Club Secretaries mtd I*lityers Should Write tor Our Cutuloguv. FOOTBALLS. Hartley Special X H/fl Hartley Special 13/6 Hartley Selected 10/0 Hartley Match II 8/0 Sberrln's - 15/0 Fcrdlmns's 15/0 Don's Verlbest 14/0 Don's Special .. 12/0 Soccer 10/0, 12/0 FOOTBALL CLOTHING. Men's Full-size Jersey...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MELBOURNE LETTER [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 30 May 1914

(From Our Special CorrcspondeJii). Canon Hughes should in demand as the conductor-not of a stadium for prize fights, but of spccial missions. He Las gained the right kind of fame (i1 would hardly be nice to call it notor ioty) that goes to draw the crowds, and that is what is needed nowadays. Wlwa the rows upon rows of empty pews in metropolitan churches are seen one can understand why church author ities in other countries are driven by the same lack ojp congregations, to re sort to all sorts of methods to attract tho people. It would ae.jn that if Borne cuurches here aro to bii kept open at all, sonic similar move in tho way or investing tho services with elements conducive to "popularity'' must be re sorted to. It is not'a pleasant fact but is none tho loss true. With this in view-the devising of means to draw tho corwds who, once brought within tho sacred prccincts to be am used may icma'u to pray-there are inlinito possibilities in the punch of Canon Hughes, which, since his en...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NATURAL SOAP. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 30 May 1914

NATURAL SOAP. It is said tliat in a mountain near Eko, N.vada, there is an ine.timist-'.ble .supply of pure soap. One may enter the niii:c with a butcher's knii'o and cut as l.irge a piece as lie ivuii:s. ' It is beautifully mottled, and en being ?ex posed to the air hardens .omcwhat. The mountain of olay is . of fine itx ture, and it contains boracic arid, sod.x and borate of lime. Its colour is given it by the iron and other materials. In its mineral state it is rather strong in alkali, and removes ink and other stains readily. At one time it was. used on tlio Pullman cars, but when its peculiar origin be earns generally known passengers appropriated it so: extensively for souvenirs' that the com pany was forced to go back to the common soap of commerce.

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Terribly Tempted. CHAPTER XVI (Conunued.) [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 30 May 1914

Tempted. I A SERIAL STORY BY ^ ANNABEL GRAY. CHAPTER XVI (Conunued.) Lenore listened still silently. She had uttered as yet no word of repwicli or of indignation at the oruel fraud practised abroad 011 her young credul ity. She was only crushed and stunned -and his voice was no longer the opi ate that had lulled care to rest-it was the deliberate tone of a man of the world suggesting advantageous changes in his household in which sho could not share. There was no regret in his tone-not even sentiment-and yet, hurt her as ho would, there was but love in her heart and despair in its desperate bounds. "If you .were talking to some one who had no affection for you, whom you had quarrelled with, then I could understand a little what it all meant," she - said slowly; her voice changed: "No, you were not worth loving, Leon ard : and this-this is harder to bear than all-I havo lost my ideal. There may have been something sinful and idolatrous in my infatuation - I am certain it was a misfor...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WOMEN'S INTERESTS [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 30 May 1914

WOMEN'S INTERESTS (By "Ambr«suio.") A rsittiai'kaWu statement was mad# at iha suiuusi nieatmg of tiia silk manu facturers ef iNuw x'ork to the elfeet . thai tuo crane lor tanjjo dancing in America r.'.'.i responsibly for increased trade profits to such an extent as to outweigh far tho loss caused by tho rix!u;:Lion of the Am-'rican tariff. Tlio manufacturers at the mooting repre sented a capita! of £'00,000,000. TJiey reported that in t>v«ry silk mill on tlie Continent spindlns and looms were beir.g driven to their utmost capacity, vraii.- unproved machinery and pro cesses of manufacture were resulting in larger profits. Practically every woman in the United States to-day, the president of the Manufacturers' Association declared, indulged in the tango and other South American dances, with tho result that every wo man required a much more extensive wardrobe than formerly. The demand for silk dresses during tho winter sea son," he said, was unprecedented, and silk manufacturers had...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FRICTION AVOIDED [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 30 May 1914

FRICTION AVOIDED A very ingenious method- of over coming the lrietion of intenneshing gears has recently been devised. 'I'll? gear teeth are eicetromngnetically held in engagement, without actually con tacting. The teeth of the driving gear are magnetised by means of suitable coils, while the testh of the driven gear servo in pairs as armatures for the magnetised tcoth. Of course such an arrangement would hardly b? suit able for slow, huavy v/ork, bccau.se the cost of current would be greater than 'that of lubricating oil and the loss due to friction, but for li^ht, high-speed work the electro-magnetic engagement would undoubtedly prove very advan taseausx

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MEAT AND BUTTER IN SAN FRANCISCO. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 30 May 1914

I MEAT AND BUTTER IN SAN FRANCISCO. Tiie San Francisco correspondent of the Melbourne "Age" thus describes tlit? -condition of xhe Sun Frano.soo market at the olid of January, when tno \Vaimato arrived from Sy<in2y..and . iJlingtou with 1000 tons of lroaoii produce and IG6,00U lbs. of butter: i!iu tactics adopted by the Sail Fran c-ibco meat retailers ara now, and havo b;oii ior several months, to soil tho meat as American meat, and obtain ti.o prevail.ng prices, thereby reaping lie.i harvest of profit. They llatly danietl they were nandJing Australian meat, and refused to bill it as such, although the .siixs and quality of the imported article was pat.nt to all pur chasers. The .prime appearance of tho foreign eemniodity proved beyond a doubt iliat consumers were getting the Australian product, but ijie re tailers maintained tnat it was Ameri can meat only which they purveyed, and accordingly demanded the locai higher prices. .One unbiassed official apily i'i marked-"If ...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
OF RURAL INTEREST [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 30 May 1914

OF RURAL INTEREST (By "llusticus. To establish * bretid of wheat that riil iion- tlireo grain* lor every two pi ..line d Ijj tli» preaont best variety i* an ach.nv onion i, of 110 mean .in^rt to \ ictona. That is the wt.ig# at which the efforts ol Mr. Rich ardson, Agricultural Superintendent, to doubel the State's yield are said to bo at present. In the decade l'JOO 10i(J Victoria produced an averago of 9.t3(3 btisheis to the aore. Ia 1911 tho average was 14.52, in 1912 it fell to iJ.U5; but in 1913 recovered to 12.5S. The average of the last har vest reached 12.SI. Of course the averago yield from season to season de ponds so much upon ilia rainfall that tueso figures aro not a true test of raising of A standard. Never theless, it is an established fact that iv;ill modern improvements the yield of wheat can bo increased, just ss the .'niilc yieid of cows can ba enhaneed through sciauilic selection and breed ;ig ;i:.d proper feeding and housing. Mr. Richardson holds that no reason e...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 30 May 1914

AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE Reviewing the subject of agricultural science in Great Britain, the outlopk, . says Professor Wood, is distinctly hope ful. New fertilisers were coming into the market, as, for instance, the ..a.v' ous produots made from at m asp J1 'ric nitrogen. New varieties of farm crops were being produced by the PU.iii br-ceding Institiute at Cambridge, ; lid elsewhere. Finally, the soil surveys 011 which th3 colleges had seriously em barked would assist in delining the areas over which such results were ap plicable. It only remained for U.ose who were responsible for the oanduct of field trials to increase the accuracy oi the results, and the steady accumula tion of a mass of systematic and scien tilio knowledge was assuri'd . It v ouid bo the business of the advisory staffs with which the colleges had recently been equipped by the British Board ol Agriculture and the Development Com-, mission to disseminate this know edge in practical form to the farmers . f this oountry...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE COMPOST HEAP. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 30 May 1914

THE COMPOST EiiZAP. Compost is mixed and rotted vege table matter, particularly manure aiul litter. Tins mixture of bulky fertilis ing materials, known as compost, while ot litda importance* to the general far mer, plays, an important .part in gar den I'.'V.ocieos, iviany of the garden crops mus'/ bo made in a very short time, or arc- of delicate feeding habits Their foc-'l therefore, must bo easily assimilable. .It is good practice to pile all coarsa manures, sods, weeds, or any rubbish available for the pur pose, m big, liat heaps, to ferment and' rot before being'applied to the garden soil. If desired," chemical manures, such ::s siniei-phosphate, bone-dust, kai uit, or nmriato of potash, may bo add ed to make tho compost the richer. Jiy .spading or forking tho heaps well a few times at reasonable intervals, a homogeneous mass is easily obtained, '.vJuen can bo applied in great liberality without fear, or more sparingly, in ac cordance with the needs of tho particu lar crop. Of e...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOUSEHOLD HINTS. HOW TO PRESERVE BONES. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 30 May 1914

HOUSEHOLD HiMTS. HOW TO PRESERVE BONES. Ribs of beef and other joints aro frequently honed by the butcher and tlio bones sent with the meat. They should at 01102 bo examined, and any hits tiie least tainted choppd off and thrown away. The bones should then he put into tli? oven and baked slowly till dry. They will then keop good for several days, and, when wanted for soup, should ho soaked for half an hour in cold water before beginning to cook them. TO KEEP RAW MEAT SWEET. Run a littlo vinegar over a large dish, then place two pieces of stick across, lay the joint on the sticks, and the meat will keep quito fresh during the hottest weather. It will also prevent flies attacking it, since they dislike tho smell of vinegar. Store in a cool pantry. TO PREVENT MILK FROM BURN ING. When milk has to bo boiled and there is a fear of its burning, a good plan is to boil rapidly a little water j usfc enough to cover tho bottom or the pan-before putting in tho milk. This will prevent tho milk f...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MOTOR CAR MAXIMS. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 30 May 1914

MOTOR CAR MAXlEVfS. The fool rejoioeth 111 his speed; but t-lio wise man looketh well to liis gong. He that is void of -wiscloiu criticises his neighbour's vehicle;, but a man of un derstanding holdeth his peace. Be that trustoth his automobile to the care of a. hired man shall come quickly to grief; but ho that careth for it himself shall flourish like a branch. It is better to ride in a tramoar than with a nervous woman on a brass-trimmed motor-car. A wise man feareth and dcpartoth from crowded streets; but the fool gets in the middle of the crush and is confident. A righteous man re gardeth the life of his carriage; but the tender mercies of the scorotLer are few and far between. A smooth road maketh a cheerful countenance; but by a rough one are ths repairers made glad. When scorching cometh then cometh shame; but with the oareful rider is wisdom.

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BLOW TO RADIUM EXPERTS [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 30 May 1914

.BLOW TO RADIUM EXPERTS Belief in radium as a euro for can cer lias got a great set-back by tne death of Air. it. (J. Bremuer, u N>-'w Jersey Congressman, at Baltimore. i\lr. Bremner had suffered from can cer in' a form which had caused Jiis caso to be regarded . as hopeless, but Dr. Kelly, the radium expert;, express ed himself confident of a euro by means of the "GUunina" rays. The easS, therefore, was looked upon as a su preme tost of tne claims put forward on behaif of the radium treatment 01 cancer. iilUven tulu.s of radium were employed at a cost of £20,000, but de spite the utmost skid the disease had a fatal termination. flighting .Mosquitoes witli Bats .. Tins is advocated by Dr. Charles A. It. Campbell, who claims to hava exterminated countless millions of the malaria-carrying pests by means of a "bat-roost" erected alongside a large body of foul, stagnant wat3r near Sau Antonio, Texas. The roost is a tall wooden sin-uoture not unlike the bel fries of which bats are pro...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AMERICAN SHEEP BREEDS. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 30 May 1914

AMERICAN SHEEP BREEDS. Tho "American Sheep Breeder and Wool Grower," the organ of tile sheep breeders in the Unitod States, gives an interesting account of iho sheep shown at the recent International Live Stock imposition at Chicago. The exhibits of each breed are arranged in breeding and fat classes, and the arrangement is very different from that in our own show catalogues. The breeding classes were for ram two Tears and over, and one year and under two; ram laniu under one year; ewe one year and undar two; 'ewe lamb under one year; llix'lc of rams, cno year and over, two yearling owes and two ewe lambs; and lour lambs of either sex by one sire. The lat classes were for each breed: Wether one year and under two, we ther lamb, and pen of live wether Iambs. Championships were awarded for both rams and ewes, and in some broods for wethers, zln several of the breeds sheej> imported from England or their progeny scored the chim wins. The general "get up" of the sheep shown indicates...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WATERDOGS. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 30 May 1914

WAT Eli DOGS. Mix dry 2 or 3 or more cups of flour with one teaspoonful of baking powder and a .pinoh of salt. Make info solid dough with cold water, and roll into round lumps a bit larger than an egg. Drop into boiling water and keep boiling hard for twenty minutes. They arc best eaten hot with jam, treacle, or sugar, and make up a sub stantial part to a meal. Though so simplo to make, "waterdogs" are very good eating, and are especially suit able for camp cooking where tlio sup ply of _ materials is limited. They ar'e quite as good, 'ithen boiled in. a half kerosene t'r ttIioh aa enamel pot is used,.

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
OUR DEBT TO THE MOSLEMS. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 30 May 1914

OUR DEBT TO THE MOSLEMS. Startling as it may seem, the intel lectual salvation of Modern Europe from the. benumbing iniluenea of tlio Middle Ages was in a largo measure duo to the Arabs. As early a;; the days of Hiirun-ai-llaschid, who was a contemporary of Charlemagne, efforts .ore made by that Caliph to make science and literature tiie permanent denizens of his empire. Tlieso efforts were still further carried tinder the brilliant rule of his son and sut-osssor, A1 Ma num. whose caliphate has justly been called the Augustan Ag2 of Islam. Learned men were invited from many Jifi'erenb countries and rennuU'rated for their labours with princely munifi cence; and tlio works of the best Greek, Syrian, Persian, and Indian writ?rs wore 'translated into Arabic and spread ever the entire Mahomcdan world. in Spam, the University of Cordova rivalled the literary l'aine of Baghdad, and Mahomcdan writers ap peared every\\7;ere as the preservers and distributors of knowledge. In tiio long night ...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MANURES FOR POTATOES. WITH A BRIEF HISTORY. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 30 May 1914

MANURES FOR POTATOES. WITH A BRIEF HISTORY. (By B. Harrison, F.L.S., in "The Land.") The potato (Solatium tub'Jrsum, Lu vis) is one of our most important food products, and its development and cul tivation have made rapid strides since it was first imported into Etiropa by the Spaniards, between 1580 and 1585, and afterwards into Great Britain by Sir Walter llnleigh. Iii "The Origin of Cultivated Plants," A. de Candaile says: "The potato is wild in Chin (South Amer.ca), in a form which is sti'i 6een in our cultivated plants, and its cultivation was diffused beforo the discovery of America, from _ Chili to Nrv Granada. It was introduced, probably in the latter half of tho six teenth century, into that part of the United States now known as Virginia and North Carolina, and it was the Virginian potato that Sir Walter brought back to Ireland about the eamo time as the Spaniards procured it. Its name in its own country was "openawk," which lias an Indian sound. Evidently dating from the ...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE OBSCURE MRS. TOWNSEND [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 30 May 1914

THE OBSCURE MRS. TOmSENQ j ,t is a startling, soul-wrenching tiling discover that one is a nonentity. A Ivotnaii may have quite clearly reeog> . , tjlC fact that slie is not brilliant Slj liavc accepted it as lier lot and h tinv to always make one of the wus- yet such is the majesty of life, '/which she is a pulse, that it will be ? oossible for her, under normal condi "?'ot'S to ever regard herself as a ne Iririble atom of the universe. To lind that others do so has the effect of a "ritual earthquake. It shakes the foundations which she has always taken for granted. Mrs. Tow:ISCJU1 was truly imodest, but she had never realised that she was capped J" obscurity, as in a cloak of invisibility, until she went to the Bien "ial Meeting of the General Federation Women's Ulubs, held at Waterbury, unl she had not really admitted the situation to herself until that break fast incident on the morning of the fourth day There »'cro two other women wear ier Federation badges at another table ...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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