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Elephind.com contains 66,464 items from Day Book, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

I;) FOUR BOXING CHAMPIONS AMERICANS ALL " We have four boxing champions in this country, all of them actively engaged in their calling or about to become active. Jack Johnson, Ad Wolgast, Abe Attell and Johnny Coition are the luminaries. Johnson, after money-making and joy-chasing in Europe, is expected to sail for the Antipodes to pick up $30,000 for a 20-round work-out with Sam McYey, exidol of Parisians. Ad Wolgast is said o he on the verge of pneumonia, following a successful appendicitis removal; Abe Attell is fighting whenever he sees real money and Johnny Coulon is starting his winter campaign. Jack -Johnson's claim to the heavyweight champ'onship is . flawless. He has bearen all the best men, taking on everyone with a claim of recognition. He is without a peer, apparently, and if anyone can see a heavyweight in his class he has a better claim to second sight than any of the mediums. has a splendid is champion lv Ad Wolgast pedisrree. He virtue of his 40-round victory over Ba...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

?, K beaten the best boys in the land. The welterweight and middle weight titles are begging. If any one is entitled to the former it's "Dixie Kid". He is probably best in the class, but has never been credited with the title. The middleweight championship was claimed by Billy Papke. but the Illinois thunderbolt lost to Johnny Thompson and they're all snarling over the name now. It's too bad Stanley Ketchell cashed in, for during his life the charnpionship always had a defender worthy of the name. ' o o ' THE DAILY SHORT STORY Food for Poets. The Poet wore long, reddish, lion-mane hair, which he would -ot have combed for 'a field of cloth of gold. His eyes were the slate of the sky when the rain falls and they looked always and everlastingly miles and miles past 3'ou. One could stand up close and see the very dreams in them. He was dreadfully absent-minded and often walked down to his work at the gas house with his gray slouch hat wrong side before. The P e d a g o g parted her stra...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

- '-- . 11 w.-fc.J- --l The Poet tapped the lemontinted thing. It gave off a sound like oaken planking. "A biscuit!" he cried. "My mother did not , make-them so!" The'Pedagog frowned ominously. The Poet sniffed again, then strode to the window and admitted a gust of icy air. He was very delicate and very irascible. "I die!" he cried. "My ethereal soul revolts at the saffron, rock-like mess ! I rebel !" "Mess!" echoed the Pedagog. ''Rebel !" You pampered shadow of a man! You bunch of nerves and temperament! You" The Poet turned in shrill rage, "If these are biscuits, take them eat them disinfect them!" He picked the dumpling things from the plate and hurled them in ungovernable passion at the Pedagog. The Pedagog, with shrill taunting, hurled them back. The air was filled with flying biscuits. Candle-sticks, gas-mantles, vases of old Austria fell to the floor and smashed. A particularly heavy, soggy dumpling-biscuit struck a bronze Cupid, which tumbled. The figure raised just four dr...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

OUTBURSTS OF EVERETT TRUE excuse fte, mr tkU, BU7 l KEPPSSSATT Tf I FASY PCKtNG UF tNSURtAce Co. or ,- f J n O ' V fr ki Tr UUL 0 I CYNTHIA GREY TO WOOED AND WOOERS Is there a solution which will kill poplar trees if poured around the roots? Miss Jones A. A salt water solution is said to do this. When a couple are to be married in the pastor's study, would it be proper to announce the mar- riage in the papers? How would you word it? Miss Lighthead. 1 Yes. "Mr. and Mrs. John Smith announce the marriage of their daughter, Mary Jane, to Mr. John Doe, on Tuesday, October eighth, 1911. At home after November first, at 234 Main street." o o There'll be 4U0 conventions in Chicago in 1912. taMMQghQi

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

-sw-flhjs if " " ''' f " r " r isf " DdlNGSO THE WdRLD boiled down John' Cadwalader, jr., Philadelphia, so loved his St. Bernard dog, which died, he has had it embalmed. ' Franz Lehar, composer of the "Merry Widow", has accepted proposal to conduct 100 concerts in N. Y. at $1,000 per. John W.. Smith, menagerie keeper,' Central Park, N. Y., has , cut short first vacation in 18 years ' because he "couldn't be comfortable without the roaring of lions and screaming of monkeys." 'Having pitched two tentative sites in this country,. Claus Esau and Peter Sieman have started for Russia to move here the Mennpnite village of Sneezakaritchnekoff. Can't the constitution be amended.so that unless the vil lage of Sneezakartchneoff changes its name to something -else than Sneezakaritchnekoff, it can not Sneezakaritchnekoff into this country? Detachments of British and German troops started for Lanchow, China, today, where 4,000 Imperial troops went over to Republic, and are engaged in battle with ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

? s tions" and then each took other back for better or worse. . Louis Zerwekh, Peoria, who last night shot and killed his wife and then attempted suicide, will live to answer for it. 6,000 actors and 200 elephants took part today in Calcutta pageant, representing scenes in India's history, for entertainment of King George and Queen Mary. Closing of Night and Day Bank, Kansas City, Mo., so excited 5,000 depositors of Night and Day Bank, Kansas City, Kan., unaffiliated with Mo. bank, that it also was forced to close its doors. John L. Wade, N. Y., who pushed his tug alongside burning Gen. Slocum and rescued "200, has been willed farm and oil stock bv Mrs. T. Ladmore. one of the 200. Atlantic City, N. J., is'to be reformed. Mayor Bachrach has barred cussin', risque entertainments, boardwalk mashers and gambling. ' Martha Maas, N. Y., committed suicide by swallowing 190 grains of quinine. o o PEOPLE OF TOLEDO WIN FIGHT AGAINST 'BIG CON' Toledo, O., Jan. 5. The Toledo Street Railway and ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

vvTtvy 'zp Ts "F 5P ) MILES" CHANGE OF HEART TO BE INVESTIGATED; NATIONAL PACKING CO. -HAS NO '. ASSETS The-first action of the government in the Beef Trust trial this morning was to excuse William D. Miles as a witness. The rumor flew about the courtroom that the government intends to, institute a rigid investigation into the remarkable change of heart suffered byMiles since his testimony before the grand jury. Miles formerly was manager of "the Armour interests in. Kansas City. At the grand jury investigation into the Beef Trust, he gave the most damaging testimony against his former employers as well as against the Swifts the Morrises and Edward Tilden. It was largely upon his-vi-dence before the grand jury that the farreaching investigation which has resulted in the present trial, was instigated. In the last two days, Miles-has completely turned face. He has denied'that the packers were engaged in restraint of trade. He hase evaded questions. He has failed to recognize his own h...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

mmmmmmmmmmm wmmm vv K r" rH by things as intangible as the $500,000,000 worth of "water" the packers tried to get Wall Street to pay out good money for. The articles showed that the National Packing company was organized at Jersey City in March. 1903, with as fine a set of dummy directors as could be wished for. As soon as the company was organized "the resignations" of the dummy directors were accepted, and the packers took their places. The most startling testimony given by William D. Miles yesterday was when he coyly admitted that the packers hade as great a profit out of the sale of the hoofs of a steer as they made out of all the meat. The courtroom gasped in astonishment at this information, and Senator Kenyon, the "trust buster." who is helping out the government attorneys, leaned across the table to Pierce Butler: "Why don't they grow 'em with eight hoofs?" he asked in a voice that reached every corner of the courtroom. "They could make more money by cutting off the steers' ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

WJ l u eg y," CHICAGO DOINGS BRIEFLY TOLD MaryBrjstpw, 18 1036 West Erie streets-planned to elope, derssed fiT man's clothes, with Martin Doey, IT. Arrested, charged with larceny. Her aunt, Mrs. ' Marian -Kurzaysays the girl took $4,5 -from her home. Fire destroyed Roman Catho-1' lie church and parochial" school, East Chicago. Three firemen hurt. Girl prevented panic among scholars by .playing fire march as they left. John Barbour, detective JEnglewood police station, married yesterday to Miss Loretto Marshall. Another leap year victim. Miss Hazel Hogan, who refused to testify against Dr. Irving Sisinger, charged with robbing hef, given indeterminate sentence by Judge Honoe for contempt. Regard for Sisinger is said to be cause of her silence. Mrs. Ella Flagg Young, superintendent of schools, has reported tha't school congestion has become serious problem, and recommends erection of six more schools and improvements to many present buildings. Mrs. Pearl. M. Mills, '44 East 61st stree...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

mmmmmmmmmmmmmm T'l Vv Tof "Q&?IUfr grees. Miss Virginia Brooks has renewed her fight on gambling dens in West Hammond, following in--formation that a man had lost $800 in a resort there. His wife appealed to Miss Brooks. And now the motormen want passengers to stop smoking on street cars. Wotnl' That's the only heat there is in lots of these moving barns. Rev. M. P. Boynton said at mass meeting yesterday that conditions under which hotel and restaurant cooks work are intolerable. He said men whp worked in kitchens sutterea more tnan toilers in sweat-shops. Will try to enforce employers to "treat their cooks as human beings, and not as slaves." Mayor Harrison has -put ban on "fly "by night" auctions. Refused to reissue licenses to Caro &Litt, 432 S. State street, and Joseph Brown, 466 S. State. Two men robbed cash register of restaurant at 507 N. State of $20 early today. Cowed proprietor with revolvers. Philip Moroney, W. 36th street and S. 67th ave., probabl...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

mmmmmgmmm v , i-r"'W " '"Wr; - i J O UNCLE SAAILS TO GUARD HUNGRY ELK FROM- AMRAIL J, MON1 TANA POT-SHOOTERS i 'njTjj1v Afntvit. w.-i . 's- "ry; .v ' . .. ?r.ix& r-... s .w.&"'-r"'xmr-r- ziZgshz- iiHirz' tM&&',i;i Spokane Wash., 'Jan. 5. (A.bout 999 men out of 1,000 in this country.never see a live sureenough elk outside of a zoo. Yet thousands of elk are being wantonly killed in Montana this winter. The government has been carefully preserving the few wild elk left by herding them in the Yellowstone national'park. But the park stretches for miles and miles and when the snows come the elk leave the park and hunt better pasture on the lo'wer levels. Montana has no especial game laws about elk, and. the pot hunters lay across the line and shoot the bands as they come out of the park. The photograph, taken recently on the depot platform of Gardiner, Mont., shows how the slaughter goes. There are 42 .elk carcasses in this picture. The same...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

WlmjWfUWW rf , 16.1 . V'T'k: pipes 'froze on the pipemen's faces. - - The Halsted street fire started in the building of the Halste'd Street Milling Co., destroying it with a loss of $50,000, and spreading to an adjoining two-story "building at 6611. The first floor was occupied by a printing concern, and the two upper floors by James Oufnlan, wife and three children. All were driven to the street and suffered from the cold, hut the monetary loss was slight. The Carpenter street fire broke out in 6847 and communicated to 6851 and 6853 S. Carpenter street. Mrs. Carrie Andersdn, her daughter, Selma; her son-in-law, A. O. Tohnson. wife and three pnilrirAti A7r, nrnorl frnm fyRJLj i and all suffered intensely from the cold. Mrs. Fred Schadd and her three children were taken from 6853 S: Carpenter street, when the fire spread to their home. Mrs. John Braun and six children were overcome by smoke in 6851 S. Carpenter street, but were rescued bv firemen. REV. C. V. T. RICHESON A RAVING MAN...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 6 January 1912

?nw THE DAY BOOK 500 SO. PEORIA ST. ,TEL. MONROE 353 Vol. 1, No. 87 Chicago, Saturday, Jan. 6, 19l2 One Cent ROOSEVELT WOULD HAVE PEOPLE CLIP JUDGES' WINGS WITH THE REFERENDUM Former President Joins in "Anarchistic" Demand of the People That Rule by Judges Cease, and Says This "Anarchy" Was Advocated by Abraham Lincoln. constitutional. ThiSjSame law, which the New York supreme court killed' has been upheld by the supreme court of Washington, the supreme court of Kaisas, the supreme court of Wisconsin, and is now in force in every civilized country of Europe, in Australia, in New Zealand, in the Transvaal and in the Dominion of Canada.. Roosevelt says he is not championing this, or any other law; lie is merely saying that if the majority of the people desire any law, they have a right to have it, and no court should have the power to deny it to them. . He also declares that bf all functionaries, the judges, are the least qualified to pass on the present day needs of the people The ju...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 6 January 1912

such personal knowledge and present the pitiable spectacle of men trying to pass on such momentous questions by fitting to them trespass laws, regulating promissory notes. The remedy he suggests is the referendum, pure" and simple. Let the courts first decide on "The people, acting directly by means of a referendum, or through their representatives in constitutional conventions f or legislative bodies, are the Makers tf public policy. A constitutional statute cannot be contrary to public policy," Chief Justice John B. Winslow, Wisconsin, in decision v sustaining constitutionality of the Workmen's Compensation Act. - the constitutionality of a law, he says, but i the courts decide the law unconstitutional let the people have six months for debate, and then let the people say by a referendum vote whether or ao they still wish the statute; and if they say they do, let the law go on the statute books. The editorial marks an epoch. It marks the recognition by a former president of the Un...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 6 January 1912

Wj ' no case will they lightly or wantonly overturn it. But secure to them the right, if they so desire, in any .given case, to vote finally as to whether or not the decision is to tie accepted as binding." "If they, the people, -vote against it (the decision of the court), then their action shall be accepted as that of the ultimate court of appeal, and shall be binding." "I HOLD, WITH ABRAHAM LINCOLN, THAT WE ARE UNFIT TO BE CALLED A FREE PEOPLE, IF WE PERMANENTLY SURRENDER THE RIGHT TO SHAPE OUR DESTINES, AND PLACE THIS RIGHT IN THE HANDS OF MEN NOT RESPONSIBLE TO US." EDISON SAYS CHICAGO DIRTIES EVER Thomas A. Edison, "the wizard ard of electricity," arrived in Chicago last night. The first thing he said was that Chicago was one of the dirtiest cities he ever had visited. "The Illinois Central ought to electrify its terminal. I'll suggest it to President Markham the next time I see him," he said. His next remark dealt 'with the weather. He said he never would have come to Chicago...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 6 January 1912

WHOSE PORTRAIT WHiEEAINT?' HiiiBiH HI r-lv 1111 llIllllgpgvBg Hill f III 1 Jl Pi- EBiSHyJl i (loZZZ0'- From the Philadelphia North American. o o Prophetess Irene has sent Speaker CKamp Clark 404 pages of manuscript containing advice, forecasts and revelations. Included are instructions for petrifying and drying ice, burning water, making cheese of straw, shoes of dog salmon skins, meat 1 Sad, isn't it? of tree bark and window panes of frozen air. But Not a word about how to make circus lemonade or hydrochloric acid, ketchup of tomato pulp or breakfast food of peanut shells.

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 6 January 1912

m JrpiwfiWpiftjjK "Wtfrm1? .DEMAND FOR ABOLITION OF DEATH PENALTY ON HEELS OF "LEGAL MURDER" IN VERMONT Windsor, Vt., Jan. 6. "The People of Vermont versus the State of Vermont. Murder. "That, on or about the fifth day of January, 1912, the State of ' Vermont did murder, or cause to bevmurdered, Elroy Kent, a man of unsound mind. , "The People of Vermont versus the Governor of Vermont. Complicity in the murder of Elroy Kent." These two forms of indictment express the feelings of the peopleof Vermont today. Yesterday afternoon, in the bleak-jail yard of Windsor, Elroy Kent, 36 years old, was hanged. The execution was held in secret. Only the sheriff, his deputies and the twelve legal witnesses were present. Not the slightest hint that the hanging was; about to take place was allowed to leak out. ' "" Why? Because Elroy Kent was a mental delinquent, an idiot, and ever since the day when a jury of farmers, in the face of introvertible evidence that Kent had been unable to distinguish r...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 6 January 1912

The. hanging of Mary Rogers is a thing of which the people of ' Vermont do not like to talk. And now another of the same sort, in the same place, aye, even with the same rope, a rope so rotteh that it snapped in two, another unfortunate has been4 done to death. The people of Vermont say there is only one thing that can wjpe the blot of these two hangings from the name of their state the abolition of capital punishment. Indignation is running high and furious, and the movement, to memoralize the legislature to end the death penalty already has been started, and is beting pushed vigorously. o o ELLEN STONE GOES BACK TO LAND-OF BRIGANDS Savannah, Ga., Jan. 6. Miss EllenAMary Stone, famous missionary, writer and lecturer, is go'ing back to the land of the Turk, to again attempt the Christianization of the sultan's people. Miss Stone's experience as a foreign misionary dates from October 5, 1878, when she went to Bulgaria. Nearly a score of years was spent there. She is completely recupe...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 6 January 1912

-a sv r't2yyrfV,2,J( r 'fc v; y relief demands', due,to the cold, too heavy for'TheT charitable institution to handle The inexorable dropping of the temperature,' which reached 10 degrees below ero last night, and which the .weather 'bureau says may fall.stilj lower, has intensified the suffering among the poor' and unemployed throughout the city, and demands upon the charitable organizations" for fuel and food were event greater today .than yesterday. Zero weather is prevailing fromthe Rocky mountains to the Atlantic coast and in its path is taking a heavy, toll of death and suffering. " All cities along the easterji "seaboard . are swamped, with applications for relief: r Continued cold weather; with even lower temperatures' at some points is the prediction of the weather bureau for the central west today. Warning has been sent out to shippers that in the north and northwest temperatures are from 25 to 35 below must be expected, 20 to 30 below in the west, and 20 below to the sout...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 6 January 1912

W ji qppw'W ' I &&& tr. A -of cases of which no report has been made. Railroad motive power has been so seriously affected that on several roads trains are from one to six hours late in leaving, the city. Incoming1 trains from east and west were delayed from two to nine hours during the night. Street car traffic was delayed, and thousands of workers, shivering in the cold cars, were late to work. The coldest official temperature during the night was 10 below zero. At noon today the thermometer registered 5 below. Following is a list of deaths, injuries and accidents due to weather conditions to local police: 1 Hilda Langley, 5 years old, -1850'Hancqck ave,, died of fractured "skull from slipping on icy pavement. ," . James a Cfoley, 53, 1249 S. Clark street, died from pneumo nia) due to, exposure. . Arthur Sketts, 5 days old, 537 N. 'Ashland ave., smothered to death in blankets in which his another wrapped him to prevent him suffering from -cold. ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
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