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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

78 THE INDIAN OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. dian, accustomed to consider himself a fraction of a tribe and lacking the full sense of individuality. Yet the failures have been very few, and we begin to see our way clear to a final disposal of the long-existing Indian question. Thrift of time will repay you in after life with a usury of profit beyond your most sanguine dreams. We ought never to think we have done enough when there is a question of eternity. .S7. Gregor. The surest means to salvation is to do each day of your life that which at the moment of your death, you would wish to have done. He that cannot forgive others breaks the bridge over which he must pass himself; for every one has need to be for given. Herbert. You cannot prevent the birds of sadness from flying over your head, but you may prevent them from stopping to build their nests in your hair. Chinese Proverb. They who at the outset count up too strictly the difficulties and accidents of an undertaking or who yield t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 79 m A) X The Irish Race In America. 3 X & CTTT? f--m- fli nlnni'oinn rf fno TTronVi a n rl the Mother Country, the two nationalities which have played the most important part in Ameri can civilization are the Irish and the German, and it may be well to briefly note the difference in conditions under which they departed from the Old and came to the New World. The inspiring motive of the German for leaving his fatherland was not the sublime idea of civil and religious independence; he left a country whose laws, however exacting, had always given him protection, and he would proudly have battled and died to maintain the govern ment under which they were administered. He did not flee from tyranny; he came to better his material prosperity, and, while he early learned to love his adopted home, he bore no hatred towards the rulers of his native land. Not so with the son of Erin, who fled from a country ravaged and ruined and crushed by oppression in every form. N...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

8o THE IRISH RACE IN AMERICA. unate history of the Jews, but, though nearly two thousand years have flown since the Roman led him captive through the gates of Jerusalem, the Hebrew still maintains his identity of race and is among, but not of the peoples with whom it abides: havingtused his splendid intellect to obtain commer cial dominion, he has lightened his adversity by relieving him self from the sting of poverty: but the Jew has not borne the brunt of every affliction, nor risen superior to every trial as has the exile of Erin. "With thee, my bark, I'll swiftly go ; Athwart the foaming brine; Nor care what land thou bear'st me to. So not again to mine Welcome, welcome, ye dark blue waves! And when you fail my sight, Welcome, ye deserts, ye caves! My native land, good night!" Might not the bard have written of the Celt who left his native land to render to every other country that service which he could not give his own. Wherever the Celt has. set his foot, he has impressed his...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 81 was submitted to the people for adoption. To th Declara tion of Independence we find the names of Thompson, Han cock, Whipple, Thornton, Paine, Smith, Taylor, Read, Mc Kean, Carroll, Nelson, Ruttlidge, Lynch,: all Irish by birth or descent. Some of them sound wonderfully Yankee-like. The colonial dames and sons of the Revolution who bore them had better look out, if they are at all given to Anglo mania, because in tracing the ancestral line they are liable to find a shamrock nestling at the base of the family tree. In addition to these distinguished men, many a brave Irish lad, unnamed in history and unknown to fame, gave up his young life to lift the struggling colonies to an independent sov ereignty of their own, and there, upon the eastern outcoast of our great Republic, his warrior spirit still guards, sentry-like, the gateway of the land he loved so well. Irish heroism is written upon every page of revolutionary annals, :ind when the flag of the young Re...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

82 THE IRISH RACE IN AMERICA. You'll find lovely fighting along the whole line'" When the war was closed and the Irish union soldier re turned to his home in the North, that home which had so long and so anxiously awaited his coming, he brought-with him a deepened love for the flag he had fought to maintain. He re turned to his former avocations and, putting his hand to the work of repairing his country's loss, he demonstrated that his patriotism was not of the holiday pastime order. But Nora's tears are dried and she long since laid her sad heart upon the altar of her country, and at morn and eve she breathes a prayer 'for a brave soul that long ago took its flight ' 'mid the smoke of battle,' and the Irish mother still croons at her cabin door, but the tread of her darling boy is never heard at its threshold. Lover vapd son reJer came b,ack: they are down there on the fields of Shiloh, Antietam, Chickamauga, Peters burg, Mary's Heights and Gettysburg, and there they lie near where...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

THE. INDIAN ADVOCATE. 83 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE XI n..ui:.i 1 1... .l i !-- ri tt a ' uuusiicu uy 111c iiciicuicunc rsiwiers ui ii a "" tt SACRED HEART MISSION. OICLAHOMA. tt I tt SACRED HEART MISSION. OKLAHOMA. tt A Monthly Review Under the Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary, St. Michael and St. Benedict. Apprned by our Regular Superior;. TRHMS OP SUIlSCIlITOrONl Single Copies '. 15c. Annual Si. 00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. . 75c. Foreign Si. 25. Entered as Second-class Matter at Sacred Heart, Oklahoma. PRIVtLKHKSi 1. K cry Subscriber and Benefactor will participate in all the merits, prayers and good works of the Religious of Sacred Heart Abbey. 2. A solemn High Mass is sung eev First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sarred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors. 3. A Conventual Mass is offered eerv First Saturday of the month for our departed Friends, Subscribers and Benefactors. 4. Kervyear, in the month of September,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

gPffjgyU1 'VW- ywyfy y li9HlpWl KUU l 84 EDITORIAL. It is hard to personate and act a part long, for where truth is not at the bottom, nature will always be endeavoring to return, and will peepout and betray herself one time or another. A poor show for hypocrits. t t I distrust, writes Emile Souvestre, both the intellect and the morality of those people to whom disorder is of no con sequence who can live at ease in an Augean stable. What surrounds us, reflects more or less that which is within us. The mind is like one of those dark lanterns, which in spite of everything still throws some light around us. Hour tastes did not reveal our character, they would be no longer tastes, but instincts. -H- 1 t is a great and sweet thing to shake off restraint and be one's self. This state is considered a kind of independence, and all that sort of thing. But it isn't. It is just plain, sim ple, everyday human naturalness. If you want to smile, go ahead and smile. If you want to cry why bellow. ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

EDITORIAL. 5 a society known as the Indian Congress, numbering over 5,000 members, and he asked whether this Indian organiza tion could be received into the Federation and represented at the next convention. The Executive Board unanimousty de cided to admit the latter organization, and Father Ganns as sured the assembly that he will have two indian delegates present at the Atlantic City convention, to be held next July. t Thkrk is so much said about the foolishness of a hen; but, says St. Anthony's Messenger, if we come right down to the point, don't you think the rooster beats her every time? He is always strutting about and crowing about things which cau hardly be attributed to his ability, or credited to his smart ness and activity. For example, when the sun rises in the morning well, you may think that he makes all the light, in stead of only the noise; when food is thrown into the barn yard, he does make such a fuss as if he was the provider in stead of the farmer; when he meet...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

" V'"l!WT,T"y '?WfVl iyT """ KG EDITORIAL. and to recall to mind the sufferings and agonies of our Blessed Lord. She begins the season by placing ashes on the forehead, saying: "Remember, man, that thou art dust, and into dust thou shalt return." Not a very flattering sen tence surely, but one that is calculated to bring 'home to the minds of all the utter insignificance of man. She imposes penances which will greatly assist in overcoming the on slaughts of passion; and the mortifications she demands are indeed slight and trivial easily within the powers of all. She does these things so that, on the glorious Easter Sunday morning, all may triumphantly rise with Him whose whole life was a continuance of mortification and sacrifice. But Lent is not a season recognized by the Church alone for the gay and giddy world too desist from its socials, banquets and nearly all festivities until after Easter. Even the raiment is changed, the gaudy, flashing colors giving place to the more sombre...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 87 Delegate's Praises. Editor of The Indian Advocate: His Excellency, the Apostolic Delegate, warmly com mends the Society for the Preservation of the Faith among Indian Children. Apostolic Delegation, Washington, D. C. January, 10, 1903. New Wm. H. Ketcham, Director Catholic Indian Bureau. New Dear Sih: I have received the report you have sent me of the work of the Society for the Preservation of the Faith among Indian Children. I am delighted with the the interest and charitable zeal which this report shows to exist among the faithful of Ihis country, and can not find words warm enough to praise the good work which it is aiding in providing the means to keep alive the holy faith among the poor Indians who can not supplv such means them selves, and who are surrounded by so many influences that tend to corrupt that faith. May God bless the work and all who co-operate in it, and may He inflame their charity to still more generous sacrifices for its prosecution. I...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

88 T HE I N D I AN A D VOC A TE. . X X Imitation of St. Joseph. X X E HH 1-T I-I W. A 1? en niiili nniuurl'juc nlirtiif liurrl Mm-c M What is the cause of so much misery in the world as the result of these hard times? Ihe answer to this delicate question is not as difficult as it looks. If you, my dear reader, will but open your eyes you will find that the faith of some people is very weak and on the wane; the desire for pleasure and amusement, sensuality in all forms and shapes, however, is on the in crease. We find old and young gratifying their senses- domestic liie with its priceless charms and Christian contentment are fast vanishing from the face of the earth. These are the true reasons for hard times. To remedy this evil we must return to the one and true faith, as brought down from heaven by Our Divine Lord. We must begin to look upon our daily work as a duty and apply the fruits of ourlabor in such manner, that we can answer for them before God. How this is to be done we ca...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

IMITATION OF ST. JOSEPH. 91 who by their blasphemous remarks try to make you shaky in your religious convictions. The world is full of these pois onous vipers and, alas, many a child of the Holy Church, hearing such talk, begins to doubt and finally discards the garment of Christ and falls away from the Church. How ed ifying is the faith of St. Joseph! The whole world eagerly looked for a Messiah. They expected him to appear in great power and majesty. And lb! The Redeemer is born from an humble Virgin; in a poor lonely stable, wrapped in swad dling clothes, rests He who alone can save all mankind. And St. Joseph, does he share the opinion of the people of his time? No, not in the least. He heard the message of the angel, and though he could not grasp the mystery, he be lieves the angelic Messenger, and thus is made the protector of the Virgin Mother and the foster-father of Christ. Could ( )od have rewarded him in a better manner for his firm, un shaken faith? Think of the flight t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

m 90 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. cultured farmers, as the world calls them, there is more hap piness, more contentment than in the palaces of the rich. Fine dresses, stylish suits, all riches and pleasure can not make you really happy. These things are the gift of God, but they must not be the main object of all your work. Learn to be satisfied with your condition and your state of life. Turn your heart away from so many things that are in reality not neces sary for life. Think of your old parents, who were so plain, worked so hard, and still are perhaps healthier than you, and have accumulated more of the things of this world, than you. Don't be afraid of getting poor on account of living up to your religion, and don't be ashamed of your holy faith. Learn to put your whole confidence in God, as St. Joseph did, and God will protect you. Work, but work with a holy inten tion of doing your duty toward God and your family. Be con tent with your work for such is the will of God, and God Almigh...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 9i m. A) A) A) No Room for Old Mother. A A & OIMfr nrrf-h marlain?" fj "No, ma'am." "Going south, then? "I dont't know, ma'am." "Why there are only two ways to go." "I don't know. I was never on the cars. I'm waiting for the train to go to John." "John? There is no town called John. Where is it?" "Oh, John is my son. He's out in Kansas on a claim." "I am going right to Kansas myself. You intend to visit?" "No, ma'am." She said it with a sigh so heart-burdened the stranger was touched. "John sick?" "No." ' The evasive tone, the look of pain in the furrowed face were noticed by the stylish lady as the gray head bowed upon the toil-marked hand. She wanted to hear her story to help her. "Excuse me. John in trouble?" f'No, no; I'm in trouble. Trouble my old heart never thought to see." "The train does not' come for some time. Here, rest your head on my cloak." "You are very kind. If my own were so I shouldn't be in trouble tonight." "What is your trouble? Maybe I...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

J2 NO ROOM FOR OLD MOTHER. children, I thought it was more than I could bear; but it wasn't bad as this " The stranger waited until she recoverd her voice to go on. "I had only the cottage and my willing hands. I toiled early and late all the years till John could help me. Then we kept the girls at school, John and me. They were mar ried not long ago. Married rich, as the world goes. John sold the cottage, sent me to the city to live with them, and he went West to begin for himsslf. He said we had pro vided for the girls, and, they would provide for me now " Her voice chocked with emotion. The stranger waited in silence. "I went to them in the city. I went to Mary's first. She lived in a great house many times larger than the little cot tage, but I soon found there wasn't room enough for me- -'' The tears stood in the lines on her cheeks. The agent came out softly, stirred the fire and went back. After a pant she continued: "I went to Martha's went with a pain in my heart never felt...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 93 waited the conclusion. "Some day when 1 am gone where I'll never trouble them again, Mary and Martha will think of it all. Some day when rhe hands that toiled for them are folded and still; when these eyes that watched over them through many a weary night are closed forever: when the little, old body, bent with the bur dens it bore for them, is put away, where it can never shame 1I1 em " The agent drew his hand quickly before his eyes and went out to look for the train. The stranger's jeweled fingers stroked the gray locks, while the tears of sorrow and the tears of sympathy fell together. The weary heart was unburdened. Soothed by a touch of sympathy, the troubled soul yielded to the longing for rest, and she fell asleep. The agent went noiselessly about his duties that he might not wake her. As the fair stranger watched, she saw a smile on the care-worn face. The lips moved. She bent down to hear. "I'm doing it for Mary and Martha. They'll take care of me s...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

cjj. TH E INDIAN AD VOCAT E. Learning found shelter in thy tranquil school. Deserts have blossomed, where thy feet have trod; Thy homes have been safe shelters tor the weary: And in dark times the glory of our God Fled to thy house to find sanctuary. O Benedict! thy special gifts are peace, Freedom of heart, and sweet simplicity; They fail not with the ages, but increase, As thine own graces grew of old in thee. Give us great hearts, dear Father! hearts as wide As thine, that was far wider than the world, Hearts by incessant labor sanctified, Yet with the peace of prayer within them furled. Thou art the Christian Abraham; to thee, Saint of insatiate love! thy God hath given Forthx grand faith, a saintly family. Countless as are the crowded stars of heaven. King Shepherd! tend us with thy pastoral love Across the mountains to our heavenly rest; Father! we see thee beckoning from above; We come! We come! to bless thee, and be blestl ". IV. Fabrr, ). ). Mr. D. W. Cronin, a prosperous h...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 95 11,289,710 as against something over 10,000,000 last year. They are ministered to by 12,968 clergy. The total number of churches is given as 10,878. The M. H. Wiltzius & Co. is to be congratulated for the careful arrangement of the con tents of the Directory. Thoughts of Old Age. It should be borne in mind that in old age it is too late to mend, that then you must inhabit what you have built. Old age has the foundation of its joy or its sorrow laid in youth. You are building at twenty. Are you building for seventy? Nay, every stone laid in the foundation takes hold of every stone in the wall up to the very eaves of the build ing; and every deed, right or wrong, that transpires in youth, reaches forward, and has a relation to all the after part of a man's life. We should so provide for old age that it may have no urgent wants of this world to absorb it from meditation on the next. When a noble life has prepared old age, it is not de cline that it reveals, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

cj6 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. nothing from the contempt inspired by vice; it whitens only the hair. Age does not depend upon years, but upon tempera ment and health Some men are born old, and some never grow so. To be happy, we must be true to nature and carry our age along with us. Years do not make sages, they only make old men. Willie's Idea of Israelites- The Sunday school teacher is treated to some original opinions once in a while. An instructor in one of the schools connected with a Protestant church in this borough was tell ing her class of small boys about the Israelites a couple of weeks ago. One little chap announced that he didn't like the Israelites. "Why, Willie?" asked the teacher. "Well, you see Miss N " he answered, "they put Christ to death. But then they wouldn't have done it," he added, after a slight pause, "if He hadn't changed His re ligion." "What do you mean?" was the inquiry of the astonished teacher. "Well, you see, Christ was a Jew, and when he turned Catholic...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1903

The Indian Advocate Vol. XV. APRIL, 1903. No. 4 "Easter Bells," A Carol. Glad Easter Bells! Glad Easter Bells! We love thy tuneful chiming, The soft breeze swells, The joy it tells. While through the sky 'tis climbing. Sweet Easter Bells! Sweet Easter Bells! The fragrant flowers are tolling Their incense fair On earth and air, Where e'en your tones are rolling. 1 True Easter Bells! True Easter Bells! We love thy sacred story; 1 Our glad hearts rise Above the skies, To Jesus and His glory. Strong Easter Bells! Strong Easter Bells! O'er land and sea proclaiming, That death is dead And glory shed Where Christ, our Life, is reigning. Grand Easter Bells! Grand Easter Bells! The Chimes of Heaven are ringing, For Jesus lives And vict'ry gives, , As we His praise are singing. W'' ' Dear Easter Bells! Dear Easter Bells! Ring on when earth is ending, Till we above, In realms of love, With Saints our songs are blending. Alleluia ! t. F. dc Costa.

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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