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Elephind.com contains 8,852 items from Stylus, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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EDITORIAL. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 May 1897

EDITORIAL. ITH the present issue we assume editofMßg rial duties. A glance at the names of those who have acceptably fulfilled the position, makes us more fully realize the difficulty of our task. To retain the prestige won by our immediate pre- decessors and even to advance, if possible, requires no little effort. If, however, proper literary and financial support is given, the difficulties may not be insuperable. Although every man in college may not consider it a duty to write for the STYLUS, yet he should regard it as an obligation to subscribe and, of course, to pay for his subscription, for financial as well as literary support is necessary to success. In the world to-day, a college graduate is generally looked upon as an educated man. How far this general impression is justified, we shall not attempt to decide. If such is really the case, then a college man ought to know in what education consists. But, if he be not only uneducated but positively ignorant, if his classic lear...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
DOMI. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 May 1897

DOMI. usual course of Lenten lectures at mm the Immaculate was given this year mm by the Rev. Father Rector himself. The subject was the Blessed Eucharist. The only novel feature in the Lenten devotions was the " Three Hours," as preached by Father Fargis, alternately with music and singing. Father Macksey gave the usual Good Friday sermon, and Father Gasson, in his sermon on Easter Sunday, rose to the dignity of the feast. Father Hearn preached on Good Friday and Easter at Waltham, and Father Brownrigg at Wakefield. Father Schmidt, with the aid of a splendid quartette from the city, sang High Mass at the Marcella Street Home for the comfort of the little orphans on Easter Morn. THE photograph of the staff which appeared in our last issue has caused no small amusement to some and worriment to others. The engraver blames the photographer and the photographer blames the engraver, and the only consolation to be found in the whole matter is that nobody blames the staff or charges them w...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
ALUMNI. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 May 1897

ALUMNI. gg|g|OSTON College men will again be prominent in the governing board of the Catholic Alumni Club. The annual election of officers recently held resulted in the choice of Dr. William A. Dunn, '72, for president, and Edward A. McLaughlin, '72, as one of the vice-presidents. Augustine E. Rafter, 'B2, was elected to the executive committee, and James A. Dorsey, '94, and John D. Drum, '9O, were continued in office, the former as secretary and the latter as a member of the executive committee. Messrs. John J. Douglas and Joseph F. O'Connell of the class of '93 were recently sworn in as members of the Suffolk County bar and are now engaged in active practice. Dr. Francis J. Keleher, 'B6, after a course of private study, took the bar examination at the same time and is now a member of the legal fraternity. He has associated himself with Timothy W. Coakley, 'B4, and will without doubt make rapid strides in his new profession. Boston College men were quite prominent at the 160 th ann...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
ATHLETICS. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 May 1897

ATHLETICS. Ssgffigtl WISE and skilful diplomat once said that defeats are the first elements of l@lil success. Surely if such a man attained to eminence through this course, we must not look on reverses as ultimate losses. The college team that has taken the dust from a competitor's heels, and has still pluck and grit enough to engage again, will, sooner or latter, take that same dust, and toss it back to other rivals. If the road to success must be paved with defeats and reverses, we are ready to take our share. On April 19, the B. A. A. inaugurated the outdoor season. Our college was well represented, and the maroon and gold was victorious in a field of athletes including such cracks as Grosvenor of Technology, Clark of Harvard, and Quinlan of Fordham. Holland with 3 1-2 yards and Quinlan with 4 yards won first and second in the dash, while McGrath secured first honors in the broad jump by 1-4 inch. The track team was less successful in its effort at the Pennsylvania Relay Carniva...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
DISINTERESTED TESTIMONY. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 May 1897

DISINTERESTED TESTIMONY. PHILADELPHIA, APRIL 26, 1897. DEAR BROTHER : I met the boys, and I trust they are satisfied with their visit to this city. I was unable to see them before they left, so you will kindly tell them of the fact. The race they were in was a very fast one, and they did excellently, for their time, 3m 345, was very good. The time of the champions, Harvard, 3m 235, was the best of the day, while the race in which your friends were, was run in 3m 31s. I caught Holland's time at 3m 345. So that of ninety schools and colleges, your boys made second best time, which was very good. In other words they made a much better showing than Georgetown, Fordham or Villanova, or what is more they made a better showing than any other Catholic College this year or last. I trust to see them again next year. Remember me to all of them: Does, Holland, Grainger and McDonald. I trust they enjoyed their visit. Your Brother, GEORGE B. DONNELLY. The base-ball schedule as arranged to date is...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
SOCIETY NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 May 1897

SOCIETY NOTES. April 27 the eighth annual prize dePS!® bate of the Fulton Debating Society L3&irfi took place in the College Hall. The interest in this debate of ours has been steadily increasing of late years, and on the night of the twenty-seventh this was made plainly manifest by the large and distinguished audience that gathered to hear the four speakers. Mr. Augustine L. Rafter, Esq., 'B2, President of the Boston College Alumni Association, presided at the meeting. Mr. Rafter is a very witty talker and during his opening address kept his audience in good humor. He observed that the reason why he had been chosen as presiding officer was not because he was President of the Alumni Association but in order that the people might more readily appreciate the extreme antithesis between the speaking of 'B2 and that of '97. Mr. Rafter's modesty and humor were much more evident than the aforesaid contrast. The judges were: Charles W. Eliot, EL. D., Chairman; Very Rev. John Hog...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
CLASS NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 May 1897

CLASS NOTES. Class of '97. Illplll HE philosophers will have a written examination in Philosophy, June 2. lllllgll Five theses will be proposed, of which three must be proved in order to obtain the degree of A. B. To each thesis five objections will be appended, three of which must be answered or the coveted degree will not be forthcoming. The last lecture in the Geology course for the year was given by Mr. William J. Duane, S. J., Monday, April 26, 1897. The course was appropriately ended by the lecturer showing that there was no conflict between the geological estimate of the age of the world and the account given by Moses in the first chapter of Genesis. Class of^B. The class tendered their sincere sympathy to David G. Supple, who recently lost his mother. An appropriate pillow of flowers was sent to express their sorrow, and several members of the class attended the funeral at Holliston. The class feels an honest pride in one of its members, Francis J. Carney, the winner of the ...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 May 1897

EXCHANGES. to the retirement of the three representatives of the Senior class from the editorial staff of the STYLUS, I find myself installed in the chair of the Exchange Editor, ready to extend the right hand of fellowship to all our many acquaintances. lam to play the role of critic. But as intelligent criticism requires keen discernment and delicate appreciation, it is with the greatest solicitude and reluctance that I pick up the pen so ably wielded by my scholarly predecessor. Attractively arrayed in its pure white Easter raiment comes the Notre Dame Scholastic from distant Indiana. The artistic refinement of its cover indicates well the literary refinement of its contents. An easy and graceful style can be noticed in all the contributions, and besides there is a complete absence of that ostentation which so often betrays the youthful writer. The poetry, which has always been connected with the happy days of childhood, is treated in a very pleasing and original manner in "My Ga...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
TICKETS FOR CLASS-STANDING. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 May 1897

TICKETS FOR CLASS-STANDING. College Classes. PHILOSOPHY. Henry Brock, Leo O'Neil, John McEleney, Francis Fogarty, James Devlin. PHYSICS. John Splaine, Leo O'Neil. RHETORIC. David Supple. HUMANITIES. Eugene Feeley, Edmund Daly, Charles Finn, John Sheehan. HIGHER GRAMMAR A. William Finigan, Joseph O'Counell, Dennis Maguire, John Walsh. HIGHER GRAMMAR B. Jones Corrigan, David Coleman, James Supple, Francis Mullin. SPECIAL LATIN, FIRST DIVISION. Timothy Crowley, Walter Mitchell, Edward F. Ryan, Daniel O'Connell. FIRST MATHEMATICS. Francis Dore, William Farrell, Timothy Ahern. SECOND MATHEMATICS. Joseph Powers, Charles Finn, Edward Costello, James Supple, Jones Corrigan, Daniel Foley, Frederic Allchin. FIRST ALGEBRA. Edmund Daly, David Coleman, Martin Welsh, Jeremiah Hartigan, John Crotty, Joseph Lynch. FIRST CHEMISTRY. Daniel Chapman, David Supple, Benjamin Teeling. SECOND CHEMISTRY. Edward Crowley, Charles Finn, Joseph Powers. FIRST FRENCH A. William Duffy. FIRST FRENCH B. Jones Corrig...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 June 1897

Boston College Stylus. VOL. XI. JUNE, 1897. No. 6

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE ORIOLE. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 June 1897

THE ORIOLE. A flash of light and a whir of wings, A gleam of gold and a blush of red, And adown the gloom like a star it sped; Adown the green and the trees a-tween, Like a feathery fire it swiftly fled, With an ebon back and a golden throat, And a palpitant, pulsatile, passionate note, That out on the air like a bubble doth float, Or a golden girl in a golden boat. A gorgeous creature, a globe of fire, A thing all splendor and love and light, A robin begot in the rainbow bright, Or the Western skies, where the sunset dyes The wings of the birds that pass in flight Through the ruby gates and the portals wide, Till tipped with vermilion and dipped in a tide Of purple and gold, they glimmer and glide Through the sky, as bright as a bloomy bride. An orange-musk in the twinkling dusk; A topaz throbbing with golden fire; Sweet music shaken from Heaven's lyre, And turned in the night to crimson bright, And gold like the yellow light of a pyre; A glimmering, shimmering, beautiful thing, Wi...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
REMINISCENCES — (Seventh Paper). [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 June 1897

REMINISCENCES — ( Seventh Paper). MUSICAL AND EPISTOLARY. — (Concluded). EPH&jT I ' be n °ticed in these letters, as well as in the letters of Murphy and KAP-MI 1 McAvoy in a former paper, that a number of Boston College boys were expected to join the Society of Jesus, who never did so. These students were Glennon, Broderick, McDonald, Welch and several others. There is a Destiny that shapes our ends, and unforeseen circumstances diverted us from the almost ripe determination to go to Frederick. For myself, I had seen the Father Provincial and was accepted. If I had gone, God alone knows but a number of my college chums would have accompanied me to Frederick ; but my mother died on May 19, 1874, and this caused me to put off my determination for another year. Father Fulton, too, was anxious to get a first graduating class through the college, and all the boys of '77 made up their minds to hold the fort till they got their "A. B." From '74 to '77 was a long time, and grad...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
ON TRANSLATING HOMER. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 June 1897

ON TRANSLATING HOMER. «Sp ATTHEW Arnold, in a series of essays, |||jgll| lias bequeathed to the literary world some valuable hints on translating Homer. He says, in the first place, that in order to render the Iliad well, the translator must seek to reproduce the general effect of the Iliad on a Greek scholar. Analyzing that general effect Mr. Arnold has come to the conclusion that Homer is possessed of four qualities: (a) he is rapid in his movement, (I) plain and direct in his style, (c) simple in the evolution of his ideas, (d) and noble in his manner. "Cowper renders him ill because he is slow in his movement and elaborate in his style; Pope renders him ill because he is artificial both in his style and in his words; Chapman renders him ill because he is fantastic in his ideas; Mr. Newman (not the Cardinal) renders him ill because he is odd in his words and ignoble in his manner." Then Mr. Arnold goes on to prove by examples all these assertions in detail. He next takes up the q...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE MEETING OF HECTOR AND ANDROMACHE. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 June 1897

THE MEETING OF HECTOR AND ANDROMACHE. (Iliad, Book VI. 359 502.) Then to Helen replied the mighty crest-waving Hector: " Urge me not to be seated, albeit thou act from affection ; Never shalt thou persuade me from going to succor the Trojans, Who with excessive desire bemoan the time of my absence. Rouse thou that husband of thine, awake that degenerate coward, Urge him to join me in haste while I tarry still in the city. Now I proceed to my home to see the folk of my household, See the wife of my heart, and my child who is still but an infant; For I know not in truth if ever again I shall greet them, Or if the gods have decreed my death at the hands of Achaians." Thus having made his reply away sped the crest-waving Hector, And in a trice he arrived at his stately well-equipped mansion, But the white-armed Andromache found he not in her chambers; For she had gone with her child, gone with her graceful attendant Up to the tower and there she pondered weeping and wailing. Straightway...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE PIONEER DAYS AT BOSTON COLLEGE. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 June 1897

THE PIONEER DAYS AT BOSTON COLLEGE. i¥Mt]l QME y ears a &°» before my time, and kl|Bajp| even before the age of Boston College, lived a gentleman, one Oliver Goldsmith by name, who studied medicine and took to literature, thereby achieving great fame, and the largest unpaid tailor's bill ever contracted by a poet. Unfortunately for my reputation, I studied literature and took to medicine, and so have not been able to make this history as entertaining as it should be to others. This sketch, however, is somewhat impudently dedicated To one who, at the healing art, some seasons spent of yore, But failing to improve his part of Hippocratian lore, Those far-off realms and sunny lands invaded, Yet dim with haze of legend and romance, And wrote in fadeless lines the life that faded In Rhenish Burgh or blithesome vale of France. When bone and muscle, cell and nervous tissue Perplex and tire this weary brain of mine, From Goldsmith's lines may inspiration issue And bathe it with ...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
MUSIC: ITS POWER AND EXPRESSION. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 June 1897

MUSIC: ITS POWER AND EXPRESSION. (<Competitive Essay.) '' Bestise ssepe immanes cantu flectuntur atque consistunt." — CICERO PRO ARCHIA. VERY breathing creature is endowed with a certain sensibility or instinct, UMzipJ} which is affected for good or evil by outside influences. These influences, in the case of man, manifest themselves in the various forms of love and hate, joy and grief, anger and remorse, varying, of course, according to the diversity of individual natures. The beautiful in art appeals to one; the metrical rythm of poetry pleases another; a third loves to travel; a fourth delights in books; but music appeals to all. Man is a natural musician, and music has played an important part in his history. Many centuries before the sweet-voiced siren on Gibraltar's rocks lured the Spanish sailor to his death, hundreds of years before Nero fiddled by burning Rome, a mother's crooning stole the cares from childhood's troubled heart and led it smiling into peaceful sl...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
TO MAECENAS. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 June 1897

TO MAECENAS. (Horace, Book /, Ode i.) Maecenas, scion sprung from kingly line, Beloved source and shield of honor mine, It pleaseth some with care to have upraised Olympic dust in clouds : a goal close grazed By glowing wheel and noble palm combine To make them feel like lords of earth divine. One's pleased if Rome's capricious crowd essay The triple honors on himself to lay; Another joys if safe he hath in store The produce gleaned from Libyan threshing-floor. Whoe'er ancestral ground delights to cleave, For wealth of At talus this ne'er would leave, That he a sailor, filled with fear, might be And plough with Cyprian bark Myrtoan sea. A merchant, dreading Afric winds that raise In their embrace Icarian waves, will praise The peaceful fields around his town; but, then, Impelled by want his bark he'll fit again. Another man there is who'll not despise A cup of seasoned Massic wine, who lies Now stretched 'neath arbute green a day's best part, Now near some sacred streamlet's whisper...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
A FORGOTTEN MAN OF LETTERS. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 June 1897

A FORGOTTEN MAN OF LETTERS. ( Competitive Essay.) |§PB9 EW care now who John Scotus Hrigena 111111 l was or what he did. The little attention he does receive comes from the strident of history or of philosophy: both, in many cases, cast him aside as soon as possible. However, to those who have any desire to enrich themselves from the treasures of past ages, to possess the gold that has been delicately worked by the hands of a master, the few thoughts here offered on Erigena may not be unwelcome. Three sometime kingdoms have each claimed to be the land in which John Scotus Erigena was born England, Scotland and Ireland. Without entering into the controversy, it is sufficient for us to state that Erigena is generally believed to have been a native of Erin, or, at least, to have received his education in the Irish monasteries. Ireland, at the time of his birth, the early part of the ninth century, was still the great centre of education in the West, and her schools were crowded not onl...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
A NEW NOVEL. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 June 1897

A NEW NOVEL. giggiggl EEF: A Life Story in Nine Phases. IIIsPS By Timothy WilfredCoakley. Boston: Charles E. Brown & Co. The author of this little work, although still a young man, has already made an enviable name for himself as a lawyer and an orator ; and yet in spite of his distracting duties he has found or made time to write a novel. He, like Cicero, has evidently fled to his studies when his ears were weary with the din of the forum, and his mind was fatigued with the wrangling of law courts. He has doubtless found that books add a charm to prosperity and lend a solace to adversity, that they delight at home and are no impediment abroad, that they throw additional beauty over the summer mountains, and give music to the breakers on the sea-coast. Mr. Coakley has evidently " nourished a youth sublime with the fairy tales of science and the long result of time." The hero of the story is Eeon Abecassis. He was an artist of Tangerian birth, who aspired to reach the ver...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
GOD'S FORE-KNOWLEDGE AND HUMAN FREEDOM. [Newspaper Article] — The Stylus — 1 June 1897

GOD'S FORE-KNOWLEDGE AND HUMAN FREEDOM. (Competitive Essay.) HAT man is endowed with free will is a truth of which we are not only profoundly conscious, but which may be substantiated by the most indubitable proofs. Yet there are few propositions in the whole range of philosophy against which so many objections are urged. Chief among these is the difficulty suggested by the title of this paper. It is one which at all times has occurred to thinking men, and to many it has seemed insuperable. It may be of interest, therefore, to consider briefly some of the solutions offered for it, and at the same time to determine its true value. The difficulty, as it is usually put, is this: How can God's omniscience and human freedom be reconciled? Man, as we shall take for granted, possesses free will. God, on the other hand, Who is an infinitely perfect Being, knows all things from eternity. Since, then, whatever God has foreseen will necessarily take place, and since He has foreseen all the act...

Publication Title: Stylus, The
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
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