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Title: Recorder, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 116,947 items from Recorder, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Untitled [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

An editor who started about twenty years ago #Tth only fifty-seven cents is now worth $,100,000. 11 is accumulation of wealth is owing to his frugality, good habits, strict attention to business, and gie fact that an uncle died and left him $99,999. — Editor and Publisher.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
A New Experiment [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

A New Experiment Charlottesville, Va., Jan, 20. — John Armstrong Chaloner, master of ■‘Merry Mills”, a large country estate at Cobin, near Charlottesville, is try ing a unique experiment to keep dwellers in rural communities con tented and check the desertion Of farms for city life. On his estate he has established a i community social center and movingpicture theat re. Twice*a week ‘‘movie shows are given, Mr. Chaloner secur r the very best films for the entertainment of those who come from miles around. An attendance of 250 at these shows is not unusual. Besides showing moving pictures, the community center building is used for open forum meetings for the discussion of agricultural problems, questions of State-wide importance, such as highways development, and local conditions in Albemarle county, interest which has been manifested in , the shows and meetings leads Mr. Chaloner to believe that the establish ment of community centers on large/ estates is one of the best ways to, ma...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Prizes Offered [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

Prizes Offered The Virginia Game and Game Fish Protective Association has $5lO in cash a Parker shotgun, a Winchester slid gun, and TOGO shells, to be award ed as prizes in a hawk-killing contest open to per sons residing in counties the boa rds of supervisors of which have adopted Chapter 158, Acts 1920. This act places a bounty of 50c each on Cooper’s and sharp-shinned hawks and owls, 15c on crows killed between April and September, and $1 each on weasels and minks, with the provision that one-half of the bounty shall be paid by the State Game Department, and one-half by the county The Department of Game has taken the position thpt boards of supervisors need not adept the bounty on owls, crows, weasel's, or minks in order to pay for the two species 'of hawks. It has also* developed that She dog law provides that counties Guay pay hawk bounties cut of the dog fund. The first prize will be not loss than $2OO and one of, the guns. You, of course, are aware of the damage done to poult...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

has been received by the postmasters, according to an announcement made today by Postmaster 0. R. McCray, of Headwaters. The post office will handle the sale of the new securities, Mr. McCray said, precisely as in the past. “The 1921 series,” said the postmaster, “consists of five forms of savingfe securities, two of which have never before been offered. The new ■forms,are* a $1 Treasury Savings Stamp and a $25 Treasury Savings Certificate. The three other forms, which have proved so popular—the 25 cent Thrift Stamp, the $5 War Savings Stamp and the $lOO and $l,OOO Treasury Savings Certificates l'j.. :)icte the series. iS the plan of the Treasury Department to encourage regular habits of saving and investment in government securities,” the said; “and in order to lend stimulus to the savings movement it has put out the two new Issues—the $1 and the $25 securities. “A feature of the $1 Treasury Savings Stamp is that four of them, plus a small additional amount in cash, can be exchange...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Tvsueyor<ppPWfe of French K'ng, Woman; of Aliasing Beauty and ' Setimingly V/ithout Heart. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

Tvsueyor&amp;lt;ppPWfe of French K'ng, Woman; of Aliasing Beauty and ' Setimingly V/ithout Heart. One of the most bloodthirsty queens the world has known, but about whom little has boon related in ordinary histories, wa* Fredegonde, a woman of amazing beauty and utterly heartless, who ruled France with her husband Chilperic from 568 to 597. She came from an obscure Picardy family, and secured the notice of the king by taking service as a common servant at the court. Her beauty was so great she won his heart, and he sent his queen to prison for life, and raised Fredegonde to high rank, lie married a Spanish princess, and Fredegonde caused her to be strangled in her bed. The brother-in-law of the princess attempted revenge, . was slabbed by Fredegonde's hirelings, and then ’&amp;gt;«• brought about the assassination of -he king’s three sons by his former wife. Ton young people In all died of her command or at her own hand, and sho. was not above an attempt to murder her own ch...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
‘SURE GUILTY OF SOMETHING’ Fact That It Didn't Happen to Be Larceny Didn’t Make Much Difference to Hank. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

‘SURE GUILTY OF SOMETHING’ Fact That It Didn't Happen to Be Larceny Didn’t Make Much Difference to Hank. There is an old New England squire whose knowledge of the statute law is limited, hut who has decided views as to common justice. Not long ago a certain Hank Miller was brought bt*lore him, charged with larceny. It appeared from the evidence that Hank had rented a horse from a farmer to do some hauling and that, during the period the animal had remained in his possession, he had fed it from the owner’s stock of grain, although the agreement was that Hank himself should supply the feed. He was charged by the farmer, therefore, with the theft qf two bushels of oats and corn. “The statutes made and provided,” tlie old squire announced ponderously, “say that theft is to convert to your own use the property of another. The horse is ihe servant of the owner, not of Hank, and Hank converted them oats to the horse’s use, not his —so I acquit Hank of stealin’ them oats —he ain’t guilty of...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
GETTING A $ GOOD START EVERY BAY Red Blooded Men and Women Are Up and Doing Bright and Early FREE YOUR BLOOD FROM POISON Take Pepto-Mangan, the Famous Blood Tonic Prescribed by •Physicians for 30 Years [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

GETTING A $ GOOD START EVERY BAY Red Blooded Men and Women Are Up and Doing Bright and Early FREE YOUR BLOOD FROM POISON Take Pepto-Mangan, the Famous Blood Tonic Prescribed by •Physicians for 30 Years Sluggish blood clogged with poisons you lazy. You never feel f like getting up in the morning; And | when you do get up, you miss that ; feeling of refreshing rest. You feel | more tired than when you went to bed. After'a good night’s sllep you should get up .with a spring, feeling alive, remewed, refreshed. And you would, too, if your blood were full of red corpuscles. Your complexion would look fresh, your eyes bright and clear; you would feel tjre warm tingle of good health. Look to your blood if you have that | lazy, heavy feeling in the morning, i Begin taking Pspto-Mangan—the | ideal tonic. It has blood-building ; properties that pick you up and give you strength. PeptoMangan is widely and hearti ly endorsed by physicians. It is effective and easy to take. It is prepared in both...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
I noil Mohammedan Fanatics Paid Dearly for “Brain Stew.” Excess of Zeal Discouraged by French Authorities in Northern Senegal in Effective Manner. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

I noil Mohammedan Fanatics Paid Dearly for “Brain Stew.” Excess of Zeal Discouraged by French Authorities in Northern Senegal in Effective Manner. Boomba is not the seat of Mohammedan culture in Africa. Boomba lies in northern Senegal, behind the west coast of Africa, humiliated at the onward strides of Dakkar, a worldly seaport knowing neither religion nor shame. And let it he known to all men that the natives in the hinterland nigh unto Boomba are as the “wee-sum’ hours of the raornin’,” in blackest darkness; but seeking the light of a great awakening. Last month, while the Clontarf, stout shipping-board vessel, now at pier 23, foot of Pacific street, lay to hi the roadstead at Dakkar, a wave of revival hithhe vicinity of Boomba, according to the assistant engineer. The blacks got religion and the hiacklands resounded with* the chant of “There is no God but Allah, and Mohammed is his prophet”—in fervent Senegalese. Now, the German found the Senegalese a fiercesome soldier. On his ...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
The World’s Advancement. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

The World’s Advancement. Those who, in retrospect, recall the days of the hand sickle may well marvel at the developments which have taken place within their recollection ! They have SPIm, besides the development in agriculture, the inauguration of almost countless devices and utilities. Thejr have seen railroads built across the continent, the telegraph and telephone perfected, great steamship lines established and more latterly the motor car and the airplane utilized in everyday affairs. Until the hand sicklfe was laid aside it had been used since that time to which the memory of men runneth not to the contrary. And yet to them, it may seem the advent of the grains cradle and the crude horsedrawn reaper was but as yesterday. Personified, those homely early devices seem almost like the explorers of the earlier ages who set out upon voyages of discovery with nothing to guide them but a vision of something grander and more beautiful than their eyes had ever beheld, —Exchange.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
New Discoveries in Crete [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

New Discoveries in Crete Excavations at Knossos, Psaetos and other sites in Crete have not merely established the existence of a people whose form of civilization was the earliest in Europe, but have shown much about their daily life, games, amusements; their art, religion, writing—though hardly yet their language; their physical characteristics, dress ami the houses they live in. A huge palace, as big as Buckingham .palace, has been unearthed at Knossos. It has a drainage system that an. eminent Italian archeologist has described as “absolutely English,” and that certainly anticipates the hydraulic engineering of the Nineteenth century. The men of science engaged in the work estimate the age of their discoveries at four thousand years.— Discoveries.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Dehydrated Fish Valuable, [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

Dehydrated Fish Valuable, Electrical dehydrating plants for fish are promised as a result of recent experiment* in England, which demonstrate that it is possible with the aid of heated air to accomplish in a brief time results that now require many 4 days of air curing, says Popular Mechanics Magazine. Deprived of every trace of moisture, the fish meat may he kept for years, and then restored for three days in water. The dried flesh also may he ground into a fire Hour of high food value. The process has been patented iu all countries.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Waiter Denounces th|P“Life Imprisonment” Which Confinement in Zoo- j logical Garden M^ans. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

Waiter Denounces th|P“Life Imprisonment” Which Confinement in Zoo- j logical Garden M^ans. “Purely as a matter of'ethics, abolition is the ultimate logic of all zoological gardens.” Such is the opinion of a writer in the Nation of London. “Animals have committed no crimes against the community,” lie says, “and therefore the community has no right whatever to give them life sentences of imprisonment.” A very few of the larger animals, he admits, may affect human life injuriously, but they form an infinitesimal portion of the inhabitants of a zoological garden. On the other hand, it is argued that we never thought of confining those animals believed to be the most injurious, namely insects —and therefore it is plain that “the punishment does not fit. the crime.” Even if it were granted that animals are happier in captivity than in their native wilds, this can only be' meant relatively, for though protected and cared for. animals in captivity are denied the primal joys of liberty and f...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Every Man to His Trade [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

Every Man to His Trade , A devoted couple, married a short time ago, took up their abode in a dainty cottage in a suburban quarter. Everything in the house was the latest and gave unraixed satisfaction. But one evening when the husband returned he found, to his disgust, that a water pipe had burst. The rooms were flooded and the carpets, which were the husband’s special pride, were in danger of being spoiled. “Well, well,” said he impatiently to his wife, “why on earth didn’t you hammer the pipe up! Here, give me a hammer and I’ll do it in a twinkling.” He got the hammer and pounded away at a pipe down in the cellar. When he had finished he paused to examine the result of his labor. Then, to his complete chagrin, he heard the sweetly chiding voice of his wife at the top of the stairs. “Howard!” said she,, “the gas has gone out, and the water is still running.” Then he sent for a plumber.—Answers.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Unfortunate Apology, [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

Unfortunate Apology, A certain editor of a country newspaper in Kansas was asked to leave the community as the result of a typographical error in his report of the wedding of the mayors daughter, relates Pep. After exhausting his supply of large words about the “blueing bride,” he had said: “The large elaborate bouquets of roses were punk.” The mayor demanded a correction and apology in the next week’s issue, all of which the editor was glad to promise. The next issue contained: “We wish to apologize for the manner in which we disgraced the beautl-. ful wedding last week. Through an error of the typesetter we were made to say “the roses were ‘punk.’ What we wanted to say was the ‘noses were pink.’ ” —Philadelphia Bulletin.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Gorilla Fond of Music. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

Gorilla Fond of Music. A gorilla beating a drum astonished Marseilles. The animal had been taken to the French port from Africa by a colonel. One day the gorilla w T as seen walking down the boulevard holding a negress by The woman entered a toy shop and bought a trumpet and drum. Delighted, the gorilla beat the drum and blew the trumpet lustily. A hard blow broke the drum, whereupon the gorilla looked worried, scratched his head perplexedly and, re-entering the shop, seized another drum and ran down the-street, beating it triumphantly. The negress followed, but the beast climbed to a balcony .and remained there half an hour, beating a military march in perfect rhythm.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Crops of Hawaii, [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

Crops of Hawaii, The two main crops of Hawaii are sugar and pineapples. The greater part of the land best suited to agriculture is in parts of the territory deficient in rainfall. This has made a large irrigation necessary. The imports for the fiscal year of 1919 were $50,743,793. The exports amounted to $88,250,021. Most of Hawaii’s commerce is with the United States. Other products of the Island are coffee, fruits, nuts, rice and hides.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Pilgrims Brought Many. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

Pilgrims Brought Many. The Pilgrims in America were more Inclined to look after gunpowder than books, but several hundred volumes were brought over on the Mayflower, including 400 books owned by William Brewster, the leader. Sixtyfour of them were in Latin, and a number of others in Greek and Hebrew, while still others were devoted strictly to systematic theology, volumes of controversies with tj»e Roman church, volumes on toleration, polemical works, and discussions on the Reformation. Every family had a Bible, of course, and everyone read it. They started at the first chapter and read the book from cover to coter. Of 37 Pilgrims the inventory of whose estates is given in T. G. Wright’s “Literary Culture in Early New England,” not one had less than £1 worth of books, and 11 had £5 or more, though only four of these estates totaled more than £2OO.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Tr [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

Tr T.to . smilevl s t fldl world other passershow t 0 9 - 9 degrees iH I did feel 9 "I insolent "9 gave. Not 9 enough to 9 farther th 9 that even t9 ing someb(9 contagious, interfe^^^^^^^H

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
J HOME SWEET HOME 4? JACK a wiLssai • 1 [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921

J HOME SWEET HOME 4? JACK a wiLssai • 1

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 21 January 1921
Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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