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Title: Pacific Rural Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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THE NEEDS OF AGRICULTURAL COMMUNITIES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 21 January 1871

THE NEEDS OF AGRICULTURAL COMMUNITIES. [ByPr. E. s. Oarr, Prof, of chemistry and Agriculture in the Vnivirsity of California.] Written for the Press. In England the highest efforts of statesmanship have been exerted foijtheelevation of industry. In Prussia, where the government requires that every child should be educated, assuming that it is the right and the duty of the state to protect itself from ignorance as well as crime, the Agricultural and "Building" (i. c. mechanical schools,) are munificently endowed and supported. Those who desire to know on what a vast scale this noble work was progressing in every part of continental Europe, before the war, are referred to the exhaustive report of the American Commission to the Paris Exposition, a work which furnishes an admirable illustration of the value of these international exchanges of knowledge. Should you visit The Royal Land and Forest Academy, at Hohenheim, a few miles from Stuttgard, you will first notice a government forest...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
UNSUCCESSFUL FARMING. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 21 January 1871

UNSUCCESSFUL FARMING. Farming, liko every trade, profession or vocation, lias its proportion of unsuccessful followers. This may be attributed to a number of causes, some of which we propose to notice. The man who is about to engage in any vocation should lirst make himself thoroughly acquainted with the wants of it; then canvass his talents and know his fitness for it. Students shape their education to meet the demands of their professions; so should the young farmer prepare himself to meet all the requirements ox his vocation. Many professional men fail, from lack of knowledge of their professions; so do many farmers fail from lack of knowledge of their business,,jind no ambition or desire to gain it by experience. Colleges are more numerous for the education of professionals than they are for farmers, for the reason that the mind needs more cultivation to aeconi2>lish alone as much as the mind and body can together. There is no school better than a well-managed farm, t...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
AGRICULTURAL EXCITEMENTS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 21 January 1871

AGRICULTURAL EXCITEMENTS. The lessons of the past are not well remembered. Every few days some new excitement is raised about the enormous profits that arc to be made by such and such crops, or such and such animals. Our older farmers will remember the excitement raised some thirty years ago or more over the silk worm. Everybody was infected by an insane desire to raise silk. A little later and an equally strong propensity was exhibited for Shanghai chickens. After this came the sheep fever; then the strawberry and grape excitement; and now we have the small grain and potato speculations. Interspersed with the above we have had side-shows of hops, cranberries, pigs and cattle. Whilo these excitements have lasted, many credulous farmers have been seduced from their routine of mixed crops, and have ventured their all upon these new tangled ideas. We are not prepared to condemn these flights of insanity, although they reflect somewhat upon our intelligence; but they have usually result...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Sheep Husbandry. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 21 January 1871

Sheep Husbandry. Wool growing being one of the leading industries of the State, the following important facts and hints with regard to it will be read with interest. We copy from the Wool Circular of McLennan, Whelan »fc (Irisar, Wool Graders and' Packers, of this city: Conditions of the Wool Interest. California. —Our wool this spring has redeemed its good character, showing improved blood, tending towards longer and sounder staple, and compares favorably with the clip of 1808. It has come into more general use with our Eastern manufacturers, and has commanded the favor of all those who have used it. Oregon.—lts condition is not as good as in former years, nor is the staple as uniform. Some lots were of tender staple and of poor texture. Years ago Oregon wool was characterized by freedom from burrs, seed and tags; it was lustrous and well adapted for combing purposes. Since then, through some mistake in breeding, the nature of Oregon Wool has completely changed, and to-day it is no...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Tree Culture. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 21 January 1871

T ree Culture.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE MULBERRY FOR SHADE TREES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 21 January 1871

THE MULBERRY FOR SHADE TREES. "Amiter" in the Sacramento Union of January 7th gives some very good advice in regard to planting shade trees, and recommends the mulberry as one of the best varieties for that purpose. Those who have witnessed the beautiful white mulberry trees lining the streets of Philadelphia, will heartily endorse the views expressed in the following extract: — In this country everybody who has a house and lot in town or city, or residence or farm in the country, should plant shade trees. It is the cheapest and most rational way to ornament the homestead and render the spot selected as the home of the family inviting, attractive and beautiful. Of course we would not i'orget the fruit. We like to see every appropriate place in a town lot filled with some choice fruit tree, and we would have an orchard containing all the valuable varieties of fruit on every farm in the country. But there are always places about every town lot or farm where shade trees are more approp...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
PACIFIC COAST INDUSTRY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 21 January 1871

PACIFIC COAST INDUSTRY. The record of exports from this city shows, most unmistakably, that the general industry of the Pacific Coast is in a prosperous condition. The sum total of the products of our industry, aside from the precious metals, is considerably in excess of $20,000,000. That of this State alone reaches very near or quite to that amount. Our exports of wheat for the year 1870, were within a small fraction of $8,000,000 in value. Though something less than last year, the larger surplus holding over, and the advanced price which it commands, will bring it fully up to last year's figure. Had the season been favorable there would have been quite a large excess. Our wool product makes a still better proportional exhibit. The yield has increased from 897,938 pounds in 18(56, to 3,055,000 pounds for 1870. This is surely most satisfactory i>rogress. Some important facts and suggestions, with regard to this great industry, will bo found in another column of our presen...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRY [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 21 January 1871

AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRY

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Successful Cultivation of the Desert. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 21 January 1871

Successful Cultivation of the Desert. The experiments which are now being made under the direction or encouragement of the Kansas Pacific and Union Pacific Railways in the cultivation of the great unwatered plains near the eastern base of the Rocky Mountains, are most encouraging, and lead to confident anticipations of complete, ultimate success. These expeviments have been undertaken, by the roads mentioned, to prove the practicability of the cultivation of those lands, and thereby give them a market value from which both the roads and the people at large will profit. The few isolated experiments thus undertaken will encourage the settlement of other sections, similarly situated, until the entire stretch of country across the "Plains," bordering upon the railroad lines, will be brought under cultivation and made tributary to said roads. Success in those localities will lead to similar experiment! on this side of the Rocky Mountains, until, in all probability,millions <&a...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CORN SHELLER. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 21 January 1871

CORN SHELLER. Our readers will remember that we showed them a device last week, which rendered the lmsking of corn a light task. We now take another step, and show them an invention which renders the shelling easy. The large engraving shows the progressive farmer, who, —instead of banishing himself to his cold barn to shell the necessary turn of corn, (for which work he has had no time during the day), and wearing the skin off his hands, in the old way, —has adopted the new device, and now shells by his own fireside, amid pleasant com pany. The small cut shows more plainly the construction of the device to which we re- for (which is known as O'Hara's Pocket •rliant Corn Sheller), and the manner of |1 LOlding it. It certainly commends itself o the favorable consideration of the pruc'ieal farmer, who has to do his own work. It is small, light and cheap, is very durable, and enables one to work very rapidly. As evidence of this last, we have the testimonial of a farmer, of Ottowa, Ohio...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
California Agricultural Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 21 January 1871

California Agricultural Notes. Livf. Stock in Califobnia. —The number of live stock in California, according to the Surveyor General's Report, (Marin, Plumas, Tuolumne and Shasta not included) is as follows: Neat cattle, 787,771; oxen, 11,845; beef cattle, "30(),:«»7; oalves, lo'S,(ili- cows, 247,603; asses, 1,866; mules, 26,284; horses, 241,146; sheep, 2,975,768. Hoos Poisoned. —The Snelling Argus of January 7th chronicles an accident which has many a precedent: "We understand from a gentleman living in the neighborhood of Plainsburg, that our friend, A. Barrel, present Chairman of our County Board of Supervisors, had the misfortune to lose about fifty fat hogs by poison last week. The poison was phosphorus, ]>ut out in adjoining fields to destoy squirrels, gophers and other vermin." Tot Cactus Fence is an institution peculiar to Mexico, The variety of the plant nsed for this purpose is called the orgando. It is eight-sided, and shoots up straight as an arrow, from ten t...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Eastern Agricultural Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 21 January 1871

Eastern Agricultural Notes. Castor Beans —Kkmaick \r.u: Gbowth. —Tin' editor of Howe's Monthly, St. Louis, Mo., hiis raised the past season a castor bean plant which was \'l 1/* inohes in circumference at the ground, and 1"> feet -5 inches high, and the aggregate length of the branches was IN) feet X inches; so that th 6 whole longitudinal growth of the main stein and branches was LOS feet 1(1 inches. The branches were evenly distributed along the length of the stem, giving the tree (for such it may be called) a very symmetrical form. AiM'i-KS. —Seventy-five bushels of apples, of fair quality, were recently sold by auction in Grafton, Vermont, for one cent a busliel. An acre of land near Newport, lihodo Island, lately sold for $5,893.40. Thk Rhine Vintage.—The vintage of the Rhine for IH7O is a failure. German superstition avers that every year written with a cypher at the end is a fatal one for the vintage. The wine in 18(io was anathematised under tlic epithet of "Garib...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Popular Lectures. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 21 January 1871

Popular Lectures.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Vaporization and the Elastic Force of Steam. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 21 January 1871

Vaporization and the Elastic Force of Steam. [Prof. John LeContk before the Msohakic Ann Coluboi, Ueohaaloa' inntitute Hall, s. F. Reported expressly for the Pukhs.J Physical Science. J,k<t. 1., Jan. 14th. In commencing this scries of lectures, the Professor made some introductory remarks with reference to the branch of knowledge to which the lectures relate. Physical science, he said, treats of the phenomena of matter, of the external world, in distinction from the phenomena of the internal consciousness. Attention should be paid to the meaning of the term "law" in physics. The word was originally borrowed from civil and moral life, and then applied to physical facts. In morals, we understand laws to be rules laid down for the government of rational beings, and in accordance with which we ought to act. But natural laws are the rules, not according to which nature ought to act, but according to which she docs act. If we find deviations from a supposed rale, this is pi'oof...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
NAPA TWENTY YEARS AGO. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 21 January 1871

NAPA TWENTY YEARS AGO. Napa City, Jan. 2d, 1871. Editors Pbess :—Nearly twenty years have now passed away since I first visited this beautiful valley. In May, 1851, in company with some friends, I started for a visit to the Gysers. We gathered additions to our number on our route through the valley, and the second morning after we left McDonald's we were fourteen in number, all well mounted, —a genial set of ministers, teachers and doctors, with two old hunters acting as guides. The sexes were equally represented—there being seven couples, if the writer is mated with the infant Ann McDonald, then in arms. Wonder what has been her history since ? At this distance of time, I clearly remember many pleasant incidents of that trip. The luxuriant growth of wild flowers, oats and peas; the vivacity aad gallantry with which the younger gentlemen vied with each other in plucking the first of some new specimen of wild flowers, as a present to the fair lady accompanying. Then the herds and her...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
OUR WEEKLY CROP. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 21 January 1871

OUR WEEKLY CROP. A handsomer collection of Fancy Poultry than that shown by us this week cannot be found on our coast, and the improvement of the breeds, arising from transportation to our Pacific Slope, can only be hinted at now. Our library of Progress in Mechanics and Science has been increased and enlarged. Tho letter from one Ikrand East is continued, as arc the Notes of Travel in San Joaquiu County. Prof. Carr contributes another vory interesting article on the Needs of Agricultural Comnmnities, showing what is being done to further farming interests in Europe. The example given of Unsuccessful Fanning will prove valuable to many, as also those of Fanning Excitements. To balance them, we are shown A Model Garden. From the hints on Raising Sheep, much is to be learned. Our grounds have been beautified by the introduction of Mulberries as Shade Trees, and we hope that otir example may be widely followed. Sitting in the pleasant grove, we have a pleasant view of our Pacific Coast...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 21 January 1871

To Correspondents.—Our Los Angeles correspondent "F. W. B." will find some valuable hints with regard to small beet sugaries, in another column. We shall endeavor to make some further reference to his letters in our next issue. "J. B." sends us some agricultural and mechanical "hints" which we shall use. "J. E." from Najm will appear next week. "Observations by the way" received. "S. H. H." sends us an interesting account of "A Cabinet of Natural History in Alameda County."

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SILK CULTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 21 January 1871

SILK CULTURE. Varieties of Mulberry Trees. There are but two varieties of mulberry used in European Countries for feeding worms—or for silk culture. These are known as the Mortis Alba and Morus Moretti. The former takes its name from the color of its berry—which* when ripe is a bluish white. The Morus Moretti is supposed to be a seedling of the Alba, and differs from it principally in the color of the berry, which is of a dark purple color. The seeds from either will produce both kinds of trees. Indeed seedlings from the mulberry are like seedlings of all other kinds of cultivated fruit trees. They are all mulberry trees, but of an indefinite number of shades of varieties. Hence in European countries it is as much the custom to bud or graft the mulberry as it is with us to graft or bud the apple or peach or other kinds of fruit trees. The object of budding the mulberry however is not to secure a particular kind of berry or fruit —but to secure a large sized and good textured leaf. T...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
RECLAIMING ALKALINE SOILS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 21 January 1871

RECLAIMING ALKALINE SOILS. Thoro arc few agricultural districts in this State, or on this coast, where there cannot be found tracts of alkaline soils. In some places it will show itself in the saltgrass and weeds peculiar to such soils; in others it may be seen glistening like frost upon the surface, or blackening the water that settles upon it. In no one thing does the soil of this coast differ from that of tho Eastern States, more than in its superabundance of these salts. There the soils are generally too acid, while here too much alkaline matter is frequently found. Our alkali would bo good manure for many eastern farmers; while if we could get their sour, swamp soil, rich in vegetable mould, it would be just the thing to mix with our saline soils. The various cheap compositions of lime, soda, and potash, make the best manures for the sour Eastern soils; while on our soils, already too full of SUoh salts, they ■would be an injury, instead of a benefit to growing crops. The plowi...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
FARMERS' GARDENS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 21 January 1871

FARMERS' GARDENS. Preparation of Soil. While on this subject, last week, we remarked that the soils along the banks of the erceks and rivers of this state are generally well adapted to the production of garden vegetables. These soils are called "made land," and are principally composed of clay, fine sand or sediment and decayed vegetation. They are of recent formation, and have been made by the operations of Nature. The annual deposit of the leaves of the forests, and the annual growth of the grasses and weeds have been covered by the occasional overflow of the streams, bringing along and depositing line clay and sand from the mountains. Since the commencement of mining in this country the making of land in this manner lias been going on very rapidly. If the deposit has been with too great a proportion of clay, then the soil thus made is heavy, stiff and sticky, and though very rich and strong, and excellent, when properly and carefully worked, for some kinds of crops, it is not wel...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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