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Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - ... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 382,303 items from Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
382,303 results
The DEATH Scream Had an implacable Nemesis tracked the explorers of the Egyptian tombs— exacting from them, one by one, the fatal penalty? OUR SHORT SERIAL [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

In the corridor the lights had   been switched on. She saw her   gaunt, bald-headed uncle Philip   at the top of the stairs, listening   in a sort of agony to the agitated whisperws of Dr. Kyne and Mr. Merriton. The DEATH Scream   Had an implacable Nemesis tracked the explorers of the Egyptian tombs— exacting from them, one by one, the fatal penalty? OUR SHORT SERIAL Complete   in Three Instalments Illustrated by Wep SHE awoke with a gasp; sat up rigid, shocked, her eyes round in fear. For a while she could not be certain she had actually heard the sound. It might easily have been a nightmarish delusion; the echo, in a dream, of the dreadful shriek she had heard those other nights. But she realised soon enough that the sound had been real. Apparently everyone in the house had been roused by it. Doors were opening, and she caught the clamor of frightened voices in the hall, the thumps of run- ning feet. The...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

This dramatic story will be completed in three issues.   The AUSTRALIAN WOMEN'S WEEKLY will adopt a policy which has   proved successful in other parts of the world of pub-   lishing short serials of high quality, instead of the old way of dragging a full- length book novel through instalments extending over four or five months.  

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
All LIES [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

All LIES Nesta had tried love with Don and it had failed—pity would not do. LAZILY Nesta turned over in bed, conscious that somewhere a clock was striking eight, tinkling out into the silence. Something had dis- turbed her. She turned over, thought again, and then she remembered that it was Don's wedding day. The decree had been made absolute, and to-day he was marrying Crystal. Crystal, who was young and ingenue, with blue eyes and gold silky hair—at mid-day Don would be marrying her. For the past week every paper had been full of it. Photographs of wide- eyed little Crystal had stared up at Nesta. Kindly editors, revelling in it all, had glossed over the fact that some months ago Don's philanderings had figured in the di- vorce courts, and that Nesta had stood there, icy- cold at heart and white like a dead thing, forced to divorce him. That divorce had hurt her—for, in her own way, Nesta had loved Don. She knew that now, when it was too late. Their romance had started in the hayf...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
COUNTRY COCKTAILS Boecardis at Bowral Dance & Party [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

COUNTRY COCKTAILS Boecardis at Bowral Dance & Party "WHAT a whirl!" said Gloria Terry, who came down from Bowral to purchase egg whisks and curtains for the new home her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Terry, have built at Bowral. "Burnham" will be the scene of a b r ight cocktail party and dance to celebrate Gloria's majority on Satur- day night. L og fires will greet their visitors, who are motoring up from Sydney. The house party Includes Mrs. Lur- line Pulton, Misses Ann Bevan. Mar- c i a Cordeaux, Cherry and Audrey Connell, Messrs. Reg. Faveaux, Hugh Luscombe MISS GLORIA TERRY -Women's Weekly study. Newman, Len Armitage, Douglas Terry, John Cor- deaux, Neville Anderson, Sir George and Lady Puller, with Mrs. Gwen Wharton, will motor together. Among other guests are Marjorie Scarvell, Jack Antill, Mrs. Herbert Marks, and her son, John, Peggy McIn- tyre, Marcia Cordeaux, Doreen Gale of Melbourne and many others. The Terrys belong to the Pioneer Club and from their home at East...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
The Social Round. HISTORY LIVES Again on June 19 [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

HISTORY LIVES Again on June 19 MISS P. PAULING, a popular Manly Associate, whose marriage with Mr. E. C. Burns, of Cammeray, will take place on June 16. BRIGADIER - GENERAL MACKAY, who resigned from his post as Clerk of Faculties at the University to become headmaster of Cranbrook, has instituted compulsory gardening instead of deten- tion for the boys. Cranbrook will thus be more interested than ever in its new Head. During the last week or two there has been some intrigued gossip about the way in which The Head has turned the recent head- masters' conference to account already. Cranbrook boys this term will pay three- pence a week to attend lessons on cor- rect speech by Lawrence Campbell! * * * LADY McKELVEY wears a posy, or trail, of exotic blooms for the garniture of her evening gowns, consequently her toilettes always have a finished look, as even in a tailleur she wears a button- hole flower. * * * GOLDEN-HAIRED June Baillieu is Melbourne's most fascinating recent visitor to ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
A DREAM for one: REALITY for the OTHER [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

A DREAM for one: REALITY for the OTHER IN the front row at the Town Hall on Saturday night, at Philip Hargrave's concert, was a small boy of six years old who was brought by his teacher, Miss Shadforth Hooper, to listen to the boy of ten who held the large audience enraptured. The boy is even now a master. When he took his encores, he announced the name of his numbers with a clear and decided voice. Little David Maddison had asked to sit in the front, so that he might watch the musician's hands. Occasionally the eyes of the small performer strayed to the other little boy with critical interest. Philip is a nuggety youngster. His well tailored short white pants, white socks and pumps, worn with a silk shirt and black tie, emphasised his youthful appearance. A lock of his hair kept falling; in true artistic fashion he brushed it aside as he energetically bowed. David is a little Sydney boy, and his teacher has hopes that he, too, will fill the Town Hall in another four years or so. Am...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
The SILENT WITNESS A SHORT STORY.. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

June 10, 1933. The SILENT WITNESS A SHORT STORY.. By . . . Cosmo Hamilton Senior Member of the World's Greatest Literary Family. AMONG the many cautions of the old wise men of China there is this: "When a woman discovers that the man she is going to marry possesses the secret of her past she must smile and keep the terror from her eyes. Having for the moment thus disarmed suspicion let her creep forth when the moon is hid and steal it from its place. There are deeds and thoughts in all our lives that should be flung upon the waters of the Swift River that join the Open Sea."   At the moment when George Ring- wood picked out an undeveloped roll of film from his brother's goods and chattels which had just arrived and read "Pictures of an angel; Monte Carlo," these words of ancient Chinese philosophy slipped from Ann Riveley's mind so that she left the films in his hand. "Monte Carlo? The place of my brother's ghastly crash," he said. "There is history in this thing. I hav...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

COSMO HAMILTON, the author of this story, is one of the many brilliant writers   whose works have been secured   by The Australian Women's Weekly.   Cosmo Hamilton, who adopt   ed his mother's name by legal   process, is the brother of Sir   Philip Gibbs and Major A.   Hamilton Gibbs, the brother-in-   law of Jeannette Phillips Gibbs, and the uncle of Anthony   Gibbs. He is thus the senior   member of the most remarkable literary family of our time.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
CONTRACT Need Not SCARE YOU... [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

CONTRACT Need Not SCARE   YOU . . . By FRANK CAYLEY "Auction is dead. Long live contract!" Australia is one of the few countries in the world which still takes its auction bridge seriously. In the clubs it still holds pride of place ahead of its rival, but its popularity is definitely on the wane. THE reason is not very far to seek. Auction is a fine game, and contract represents the development of all that is best in it. Contract is not new, difficult or revolutionary. On the con- trary, it is probably much easier to play first-class contract than first-class auction. The opponents of contract condemn it as being "overburdened with conven- tions, and too much like hard work for the average player." By "conventions" we must assume that they mean "arti- ficial conventions." All other varieties are just crystallised common sense. In point of fact, all artificiality has been reduced to a minimum, and there are few calls which have any hidden meaning. WHERE THE GAMES DIFFER...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
PoiNTs oF ViEW [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

I SUPPOSE men think themselves terribly important when they go solemnly about trade conferences, and make commercial treaties, and so on, but a good deal of inter-country trading goes on of which they are quite oblivious, though any house- keeper could give them practical hints. For instance—you will remember that a month or two ago there was a great to-do be- tween Australia and New Zealand. We quaran- tined New Zealand potatoes, and New Zealand retaliated by banning our fruit. Then the Com- monwealth Minister went across the Tasman, the men drew up a trade treaty, removed the embargoes, and went off rejoicing. Why Not Our Own? EVERYTHING, they thought, was now quite   satisfactory, I wonder! I wanted oysters for soup the other day, and just missed the man who hawks the Georges River (fresh) pro- duct, so I slipped round to the grocer and asked for tinned. When I reached home I found that the oysters he had sold me were from New Zealand! And our coast thick with oyster...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
The Beauty of Orchids Now the rage for all occasions [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

The Beauty of Orchids Now the rage for all occasions By MARY MURDOCH ISN'T it astounding how orchid- minded we are becoming? Go to any social gathering to-day and you will find almost every woman in the throng wearing a spray of orchids. AT race meetings, theatres, weddings, bridge afternoons, dinners, and dances, orchids may be seen nestling in luxurious furs, adorn- THE PERFECT FINISH to the toilette of Mrs. Jimmy McCarthy, of "Silchester," Fairfax Road, is the posy of mauve orchids. Her friend is Deetije Andriesse. —Dorothy Welding ing the high line of the decolletage in front or trailing in sprays over slim shoulders down to the waist at the back. The bride chooses orchids for her wedding sheaf. The groom puts an orchid in his buttonhole. Babies cry for them and mothers simply must have them (orchids, not babies). They arrive in cunningly-shaped boxes at the doors of women young and lovely—and are ordered recklessly by women not-so-young and definitely not-so-lovely. If the thin...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

WHAT WILL 65 HAVE IN STORE FOR YOU ? Will it be a quiet eventide, free from care and business worry, enriched with the memories of the years, and heartened by loving companionships which Time has mellowed and long association has rendered only more hallowed? Will it provide the long-looked-for leisure for the pursuit of cherished hobbies, in the certain knowledge that the years when you move steadily toward the sunset are bring- ing with them their own material provision? Or will dreaded 65 merely mean the end of earning power, with the denial of accustomed comforts and the grim struggle for daily bread made yet grimmer? The happy and all-sufficient solution to the problem lies in a Prudential Guaranteed Income Policy, designed by the Empire's greatest assurance institution to meet just such a con- tingency. The Prudential Assurance Company Ltd. (Incorporated in England) Head Office for Australia & New Zealand: HERALD BUILDING, 66 PITT STREET SYDNEY AN ASSURED INCOME OF £2 A...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
MOSTLY ABOUT MEN [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

MOSTLY ABOUT MEN BY JANE ANN SEYMOUR SNUBBING WOMEN ARRIVING on the cosmic scene be-   fore woman, man enjoyed a period   of supreme Fascism, during which he acquired the habit of bossing everything in sight. With all the animals hithering and thithering at his say-so, he must have had a high old time, and, doubtless, he would never have allowed woman a look-in in the world at all had he not been unconscious at the time she made her debut. Since then, whenever there's a woman in the offing, man suffers a lapse into the old primeval stupor, and never quite has all his wits about him while she remains in his immediate neighborhood. And a good thing, too; for though all the sons of Adam have inherited the ancestral superiority com- plex, woman regards their queer de- lusions concerning their natural grandeur more in wonder than in anger. Man rarely becomes too unmanageable to be bearable, and that's the main thing, after all. Still, a little frankness now and ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
NEW ANGLES IN YOUR HOME Move your pictures and furniture around [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

HEW ANGIES IN YOUR HOME Move your pictures and furniture around       By A HOME DECORATOR Wanderlust,   the urge to travel, are words we are all prone to employ on the faintest provo- cation. The sight of an overseas boat, or even a mail train, immediately evokes a longing for a chance—change of air and change of scene; after which we return to our homes, park the wraps in the accustomed spot, eat our dinner facing the same old wall, and eventually re- tire to a bed in its time-honored corner. ISN'T there an old adage to the effect that women and inconsist- ency were synonymous terms? On this subject of change, many of us are apt to prove the truth of the assertion, for while we sigh for new vistas, we take our homes for granted, and year after year the appurtenances of our rooms greet us from their customary corner. Infinite pleasure, a definite mental stimulus, and an antidote to that long- ing to wander can be achieved by the si...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Our Dogs [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

Our Dogs The Scotch Terrier can be relied on. DIE-HARD is his nickname, and it is said he inhabited Scotland when Abraham was a youth. There's not a whole lot of him, but what there is, is all DOG; just ask the man who owns one. To you he offers a kindly, quiz- zical look, and an almost embar- rassing interest in your affairs. To your friends he offers all the cour- tesies, and expects them in return. His is a sensitive character. In on everything, Scotty finds nothing comes amiss. Finally, when he barks, he means something— senseless yapping makes no appeal to Scotty's masculine intellect. True dignity in small parcels— such is Scotty.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Only a Rose, Butt— [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

Only a Rose, Butt— I WONDER if you would be interested to hear of an incident which has lived in my memory for many years, as typical of the simple kindliness of the truly great. I was sitting in the front row of the stalls at one of Dame Clara Butt's con- certs in His Majesty's Theatre, Bris- bane. So great was the attendance on this particular night that the manage- ment had placed rows of chairs on the stage, allowing only a restricted pas- sage-way for the prima donna between the first row and the organ. On one of these chairs sat a little, old woman, spell-bound. She was shabbily dressed, and one could picture the care- ful economy that had been the cost of her evening's delirious entertain- ment. As the great singer made her entrance for the second time the little old woman leaned forward in her eagerness. Alas! the narrow space left only room for Dame Butt to pass through, and she tripped over the little, old woman's feet. The poor old face was transformed from ecstasy to abj...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

For the best "Clever Idea," 10/- will be paid. A minimum of 2/6 will be paid for other ideas published.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
FREE Pattern This is Our [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

FREE Pattern This is Our   High necks are very popular this winter, and the free pattern shows an attractive style with cross-over bodice, fastening with buttons. The slim-fitting sleeves are also trimmed with rows of buttons up the back. Gored skirts enable one to have a slim- fitting line over the hips and a slight flare at the hem. You will require three and three-quarter yards 36in. material. The free pattern is cut to fit size 36in. bust. All seams and hems must be allowed for when cutting. Patterns of this smart frock are avail- able to readers while supplies last. Fill in the coupon below, enclose 1d stamp for postage, and send to The Australian Women's Weekly, G.P.O. Box 4088W, Sydney. Mark your envelope, "Pattern." Be sure to give your full name and address.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
PATTERN SERVICE ...One Pattern Is FREE Each Week [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

PATTERN SERVICE . . . One Pattern Is FREE Each Week   All inquiries and letters re-   garding the pat-   tern service     should be ad-     dressed to the     Pattern Depart-     ment, The Aus-       tralian Women's Weekly, 321 Pitt Street, Sydney;   or Box 4088W,   G.P.O., Sydney   WX17.—Frock of velvet with Dolman sleeves, also contrasting sleeve and front trimming. Material required, three and three-quarter yards 36-inch, and three-eighths yard 36-inch contrasting. To fit size 36-inch bust. Width at hem, one and three-quarter yards. Other sizes, 32, 34, 38 and 40-inch bast. PAPER PATTERN, 1/1. WX18.—Frock with lap-over skirt. The fur trimming on this frock of wool-de-chene gives it a smart and cosy appearance. Material required, five and five-eighths yard 36-inch...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Contrasts In Color The Smartness Of Grey Continued from previous column [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

Contrasts In Color   The Smartness Of Grey Continued from previous column Beige coat over a bright coral pink dress and coral hat. Beige suit with a red and white candy striped blouse. You can go color mad with grey. It is used by nearly every designer in Paris for all types of clothes. Deep battleship grey through many shades tc pale pearly grey. The illusion that it is a "hard color to wear" will not be an ex- cuse any more, as you may put almost any color imaginable with it. Choose three shades of grey cyngalia (a soft, hairy woollen) and have the darkest for the skirt, the palest for the top, the in-between for a short jacket. Wear with this a wide belt of raspberry- colored suede, with hat to match. Wear a tunic blouse of bright yellow with a three-quarter-length grey swagger coat and skirt. A plaid of dusty pink, white, and black will look stunning made into a blouse and hat, with a cardigan suit of the pale pearly tint. Just think of all the ways you could use an...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
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