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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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FATHER AND SON. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

FATHER AND SON.   Papa: "What a boy you are to ask questions, Johnny! I never used to ask so many question when I was a boy." Johnny: "Perhaps if you had, papa, you might be able to answer some of mine."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A BROKEN ENGAGEMENT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A BROKEN ENGAGEMENT.   Ned: "She asked me to return her letters." Jack: "Well, did you?" Ned: "Oh, yes, I returned them. And I dropped three or four from other girls in with them.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A COBRA BITE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A COBRA BITE.   Dr. Calmette, the director of the Paris Pasteur Institute, was bitten by a cobra from which he was extracting the venom. The serum which he discovered undoubtedly saved his life, but after a lapse of three weeks one of his fingers had to be amputated.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
OF SOLID GOLD. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

OF SOLID GOLD.   The walls and ceilings of the Czar's kitchen, at St. Petersburgh, are of black marble, covered with valuable ornaments. The kitchen utensils are of solid gold, and date back to the time of the Empress Catherine. The value is enormous, and there are among them several saucepans worth £50, while a fish kettle is worth £1000. The kit- chen staff consists of 267 persons, and the head cook receives a salary which can truly be de- scribed as princely.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WORTH KNOWING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

WORTH KNOWING.   The composer's autograph stamped on a sheet of music shows that he or she receives a roy- alty for each copy sold. When the composition has been sold outright it is not so marked.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SIX HUNDRED-FOOT WATERFALL IN HAWAII. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

SIX HUNDRED-FOOT WATERFALL IN HAWAII. The Bishop Museum has an exploring party in the field surveying and measuring the rainfall and water supply of the Honolulu region, in order to determine whether it is practicable to store water in the mountains and carry it to sugar plantations in flumes. The endowment of the museum includes lands in Kohala and Hamakua, on the island of Hawaii, in which are Waipio and other gulches that extend from the sea to the highest points of the Kethala Moun- tains. The party has made a number of impor- tant geographical discoveries. The source of Waipio River has been found to be several miles further up the mountain than was supposed, and in a waterfall that has one sheer fall of 600ft., and in this exceptionally dry season runs 8,000,000 gallons per day. The party reached this water- fall only because of the low water, which per- mitted the explorers to ascend the bed of the stream. The forest growth was nearly impene- trable, and the trail had to be c...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ENGLAND'S OLDEST CLERGYMAN. WHO DIED RECENTLY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

ENGLAND'S OLDEST CLERGYMAN. WHO DIED RECENTLY. The Rev. George Docker Grundy passed peace- fully away recently at his vicarage of Hey, near Oldham (Eng.), dying on the King's birthday, at the age of 94. On October 20 he preached to large congregations. This marvellous clerical veteran was never absent from his church on more than three Sundays. To have been a parochial clergyman 70 years, of which 63 were passed in the same parish, con- stitutes a wonderful record, which entitled Mr. Grundy to be regarded as the "Father" of the Church of England. He was a contemporary at Oxford of Mr. Gladstone, and used to entertain his friends with lively reminiscences. Mr. Grundy never had a curate to help him in his parish till he was 76 years of age. He was a clergyman some six years before Queen Victoria came to the throne. Up to very nearly the end of his life he not only officiated at two services on Sunday, but also took a class in the after- noon. One incident in this clergyman's life spec...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Capital Loss. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A Capital Loss. (BY SWIVEL-EYE.) It was close to Christmas. What year? What odds!   This is written for a new paper, and I don't know what sized type will be used, nor how wide the columns will be; the lack of which knowledge necessitates caution, as it were. The time was hard upon midnight. To be precise, it was 11.54 p.m. by the Water- bury watch of the wakeful policeman who stole silently round to the back door of the hotel in "The Policeman Quaffed." Woolloomooloo. The anticipated dipperful of malt liquor was there upon the window-sill. The policeman quaffed. Did you ever see a policeman quaff? "R," he murmured. A policeman never murmurs any other consonant upon such occasions. But what, the intelligent reader will naturally ask, has this to do with the story? There you have me. I said it was close to Christmas, and if I hadn't been interrupted by the "bottle-oh" man for the 15th time this morning (you can tell this yarn is written in the morning by the clearness of...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BIG FIGHTS. FOR LITTLE THINGS. FORTUNES AND LIVES GIVEN UP FOR CUPS, CROSSES, AND JACKETS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

BIG FIGHTS. FOR LITTLE THINGS. —♦— FORTUNES AND LIVES GIVEN UP FOR CUPS, CROSSES, AND JACKETS. It is estimated that fully one million pounds   sterling have been spent in the various unsuc- cessful attempts to wrest from Uncle Sam the America Cup.   Yet, considered as a piece of plate pure and simple, its value is trifling. Made in London in 1849 by Messrs. R. and S. Garrard, it was originally known as the "One Hundred Guinea Cup," that sum representing approximately its prime cost.   Its present name was bestowed upon it in 1861 by its winner, Commodore John C. Stevens, of New York; not, however, out of compliment   to his country, as is generally supposed, but to   perpetuate the memory of the winning yacht   America, a schooner-rigged craft of 170 tons. The trophy is, of course, of silver, and weighs 135 ounces. Exclusive of its pedestal, it is twenty-seven inches in height, and at its widest &n...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PHENOMENAL MEMORIES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

  PHENOMENAL MEMORIES.   Many of the greatest men have had pheno- menal memories. Caesar knew the names of thousands of soldiers in the legions. A modern man of science often has a prodigious memory for special terminology. Professor Asa Gray assures us that he could at once recall the names of something like 25,000 plants; Professor Theodore Gill can do the same for fishes. Our memory for mere words is itself much more extensive than is generally admitted. The average well-to-do child of two years has a vocabulary of some 500 words, and its father may have the command of 20,000 more. The 10,000 verses of the "Rig Veda" have for 3000 years been accurately preserved in the memories of the Brahmins. Not one Brahmin alone, but thousands, can to-day recite it word for word. Thousands of Mohammedans, likewise, know the Koran by heart, as all learned Chinese know their classic books. The chiefs of Polynesia can and do repfeat hundreds of thousands of words in the...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
IN A CORNWALL LODGING HOUSE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

IN A CORNWALL LODGING HOUSE. As a specimen of lodging-house rules, perhaps   the following, given on an old signboard dis-   covered in Cornwall are the most extraordinary,   and at the same time amusing:—   Fourpence a night with bed; sixpence with     supper.     Not more than five to sleep in one bed.   No beer allowed in the kitchen.   No smoking when in bed.   No clothes to be washed on Sunday.   No boots to be warmed in bed.   No dogs allowed upstairs.   No gambling or fighting here.   No extra charge for luggage.   No razor grinders taken in; organ grinders   to sleep in the attack.   Donkeys, chaises, handcarts, and durries let on hire.   Mangling done here.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
VACCINATION SONG. (To an Old Tune.) [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

VACCINATION SONG.       —♦— (To an Old Tune.) My name is Richard Hall; (Mind my arm!) Confound you one and all; Confound you great and small: (Mind my arm! Mind my arm!)   The papers said "Beware!" (Mind my arm!)   So vaccination rare I did achieve with care; (Mind my arm! Mind my arm!) I went to Doctor Fell; (Mind my arm!) 'Twas done, and took too well, And it give me—Oh!   (Mind my arm! Mind my arm!). Chorus. Sing hey for Richard Hall! (Mind his arm!) He'll curse you one and all; He'll curse you great and small; (Mind his arm! Mind his arm!) —"Modern Society."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FACE PATCH FLIRTATIONS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

FACE PATCH FLIRTATIONS.                   Face patch, like all other styles, have their   exits and their entrances. Generally speaking,   they are "out" just now, but still there are     enough of them on show to make the observer   wonder if the present-day wearer of patches   attributes to them the same meanings that were at one time so well known as to constitute a com-   mon language. In former seasons, when black   patches broke out on the faces of dames and   damsels like a virulent rash, regular patch flirta-   tions prevailed, and an ingenious belle could say   most anything she wanted to by means of   patches.     To be sure there were combinations, and, un-   less t...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A SNARE FOR THE BOERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A SNARE FOR THE BOERS. As everyone knows, the railways of the Transvaal are guarded by a series of blockhouses,   after the manner of the blockhouses used by the Spaniards in Cuba. In South Africa no block-   house is considered reasonably complete without its dummy sentinel. Not infrequently there is     added a dummy gun, and as the sketch shows, these are often more wonderful to look at than   the sentinel. They are constructed out of all the odd bits of wood obtainable, tied up with rope     and otherwise made as unsightly as possible. These snares have proved invaluable in deceiving   the Boers.          

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
IN A TRAM. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

IN A TRAM.   "My husband is so poetic," said one lady to   another, as they settled down in their seats in a   city car.     "Have you ever tried rubbin' his j'ints with hartshorn liniment, mum?" interrupted a wo-   man with a market basket at her feet; who was   seated at the lady's elbow and overheard the   remark. "That'll straighten him up as, quick as   anything I know' of, if he ain't got it too bad."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PERFECT PEARLS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

PERFECT PEARLS. To-day the finest pearls are worth three   times as much as they were fifteen years ago,   though imperfect pearls are probably cheaper.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SANDWICHES AND ROMANCE [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

  SANDWICHES AND ROMANCE     A millionaire ranch-owner, passing through   Illinois, U.S.A., ate some most appetising sand- wiches at a luncheon counter, and fell in love with the lady who served them. He proposed   there and then, was accepted, wrote but a   cheque for £2000 for the trousseau, and the pair are now on their honeymoon.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A ROYAL ROMANCE. LORD ELPHINSTONE AND THE QUEEN. THE SILENT GUEST. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A ROYAL ROMANCE.   LORD ELPHINSTONE AND THE QUEEN.   THE SILENT GUEST. Loft Elphinstone (says "M.A.P."), who has just returned to England after a protracted tour in company with Mr. Vanderbilt after "big game," is not only distinguished as an enthusias- tic sportsman, but as the representative of one of the most ancient titles in the United Kingdom. Created as long ago as 1509, the barony has given to England many famous administrators, notable among them being the peer whose ser- vices in India at and after the downfall of the Mahratta power in 1817 are ranked by historians next to Wellesley's in consolidating British dominion in the Far East. LOVED QUEEN VICTORIA. His immediate successor in the title was reput- ed one of the handsomest men in England in the early years of the last reign, and a romantic interest attaches to his memory. Brought by the circumstances of his rank and court em- ployment into the almost daily society of his youthful sovereign in...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A NEW BEAUTY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A NEW BEAUTY. M. Coquelin claims to have discovered in America a new beauty. The young woman in whose presence he declared himself speechless is Miss Elsie Richmond, of Boston. Before the great French actor had taken leave of the beauty, however, he recovered the art of expression for which he is renowned. "Mademoiselle," he said, "you are a most exquisite and perfect example of the highest type of loveliness I have seen in America. You are, in fact, the most beautiful woman I have seen, in all my ex- perience." The experience of M. Coquelin has been vast and varied. He has travelled in his career as actor from one part of the globe to the other. He has seen women of every color and every country. AND HER RETORT.   Miss Richmond during this eulogy stood in the wing of a Boston theatre watching the immortal Sarah Bernhardt in the role of the Little Eaglet. She had been engaged to play one of the ladies at the Austrian Court. In a costume fitted to the small part assigned...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MRS. LANGTRY AND THE YARMOUTH GIANT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

MRS. LANGTRY AND THE YARMOUTH GIANT.   —♦—     At Yarmouth (Eng.), where Mrs. Langtry was   playing not long ago, a local giant, boasting a   height of some 7ft., applied to her manager for a   berth.   He suggested that his unusual proportions   would attract much attention if used in an ad-   vertising way; but he attached such a high mone-   tary value to his services that he was told they   would not be required.   He was not to be denied, however, and climbed   down and down in price until he reached 30s,   which he told the manager was the absolute   limit.   "Surely," said he, "If I went round the streets   with Mrs. Langtry on my back, it would be worth   thirty bob!"   The manager was horrified, and asked the man   if ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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