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Title: Mortlake Dispatch Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 19,644 items from Mortlake Dispatch, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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POTTING BUTTER. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 24 January 1914

POTTING BUTTER. A practical correspondent, in reply to an enquiry, tlnis describes tho methods he lias found successful:-"A vessel intended for keeping butter should bu deep, with a. mouth not exceedingly 10 inches in width. Butter made ioi keeping should bo churned irom ripen ed cream. The temperature on tJiu day of churning should be as low as possible, and if water can bo obtained at 50 deg. for washing, so much tho better. After at least three wash ings, during which the butter is rooked gently to prevent its aggregation, iV should bo brined and subsequently placed in a trough to drain and dry. if a butter box is provided for cooling, so much tho better, inasmuch as for keeping the butter should be quite firm before salting and working 011 tho but ter worker. The salt should be ground almost as fine as llour, having first been thoroughly dried. It is then distributed 011 the butter, after thu roller has been passed over it, at the rate of three-quarters of an ounce to tho pound....

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DURABILITY OF A HORSE. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 24 January 1914

DURABILITY OF A HORSE. A liorso will travel 400 yards in 4.\ minutes at a walk, 400 yards in two minutes at a trot, and 400 yards lit onu minute at a gallop. The usual work of a horse is taken at 22,500 lb. raised one i'oot per minute for eight hours pur day. A horse will Carry 250 lb. 25 miles per day of eight hours. An average draught horse will draw 1000 lb. 23 miles per day on a level roud, weight of waggon included. The average weight of a horso is 1000 lb; his strength is tqual to that of iivo men. In a horse iniil, moving at three feet per second, track 25 ft.' diameter, lie exerts with tiio machine the power of 41 horses. The greatest amount a liorso can pull in a horizontal imo is 900 lb.; but he can only do this momentarily; in continued oxertion probably half of this is- the limit. Ho attains lii.s growth in live years, will live 25, average 1G years. A horse will live 23 days on water without solid food, 17 days without eating or drinking, but only five days on solid foo...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IN A FRIENDLY SORT OF WAY. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 24 January 1914

I IN A FRIENDLY SORT OF WAY. I When a man ain't got a cent and is's feeling kind o' blue. And tho clouds hang dark and heavy and won't let tiio sunshine through, It's a great thing, O my brethren, ior a fellow just to lay His hand upon, your shoulder in a friendly sort o' way. It makes a man feel curious, it makes tho teardrops start, An' you sort o' feels a flutter in Uio region ol: the heart; ' You can't look up and meet his eyes, you don't know what to say, When his hand is on your shoulder in a friendly sort o' way. Oh, tho world's a curious compound with its'honey and its gall, With its cares and bitter crosses, but a good world after all; An' a good God must have made leastways that is what I say, When a hand is on your shoulder in a friendly sort of way.

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHATS WITH THE COOK. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 24 January 1914

CHATS WITH THE COOK To select a/ liam.-Pierce through the thick part with a meat knife. If the blade draws out clean, the na'ii is a good one, but if the fatty subs tance sticks to it, another selection should bo made. It should also havo a sweet rich sinell. After making a satisfactory selection, wash and sera tho hum until clean, and then let it stand, in fresh water over night. In tho morning submerge it in a kettle of nearly boiling water. Let it cook gently for an hour, when you may throw in a carrot, if there is no ob jection to tho llavor, also a sprig 01 parsley, or a few cloves and bay leaves. tr> suit tho taste. When tho meat is done, let it stand in tho Jiqupr until cool, thus leaving it juicy and tender. Never boil any salt meat severely, but keep it at a gentle simmer until dono. To give tho ham a line appearance, cover it with breadcrumbs when' cold, and brown lightly in the oven". This not only improves the llavor, tut makes it possible t;o serve the samo as baked ...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOME-CUBED BACON. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 24 January 1914

HOME-CUBED BACON. Some time ago we referred to a Laon curing demonstration held at Bathursc, under the audioes of the local A., H., and P. Assooiation, the demonstrator being Mr. D. Hogarth, of that city. The process adopted is one that has been in vogue among certain families in tlio North of Fngland for centuries, and may be considered one of those old family sccrets, known only to a limited number, and highly profitable to the owners. At the demonstration, 11 pigs of varying weight, breed, and feeding were treated. Some of them weighed under 200 lu., while a conplo turned the scale at 310 and 350 lb respectively. All ol: the bacon has since been out into, and in every case satisfaction has been expressed as to the quality of the product. One of the owners lias sold all that ho could spare of the baoon at 1/ per II), and would make a great fa vor of selling the liarns at 1/(5 per lb. The other owners have, so far, refused to sell at any price. Since the article appeared Mr. Hog ar...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
INTRINSIC VALUE OF MANURE ON THE FARM. THE USES IT SERVES MAKE IT OF VAST ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 24 January 1914

VALUE OF MANURE N THE FARM. IT SERVES MAKE II ,!l"r\ ' <1' JfiCUxNOMiO IMPOllT ui; U AiNCE. , ; llliP0,ible to accurately estimate ll'V .minev value or farm .manure. ^ " i iert.li.er; tha* is, the ^ *' v-iuc of the plant iood that it W"!11'* "oil, may easily be computed ?--r analysis. But through ;r,:'"he country, as a general rule us (llib ?! lernliser requires much less v:l!^l"ravi..n that its other- values lis ctlm "oil iar transcends in r\ilue'of the plant food it va!.UL- -lie soil. These other uses oi raid ntimire are of prime Importance , ,,,-uduciiig capacity of most soils "i .,'ve not been given enough cou and as a result, the pro Capacity of these soils lias not jj^a.le whut it might easily have !l^XVll soils are .seriously lacking . -Vv,li--blo content. Vegetal 111 uiH~usrs «P the vegetable content. 8?"!U -oil A.i'ter land has been suc u!-lv!illv cropped for a number of years T d»tv-ed vegetable matter in *ho i'l kcoBics more or less exhausted , rli" producing c...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MAKING A STACK COVER. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 24 January 1914

MAKING A STACK COVER. la requesting information upon "the best mixture to put on a hessian stack cover to make it waterproof and not to rot it," a correspondent explains that, ho has tried Stockholm tar and mut ton fat, but that mixture makes tho cover too heavy, and tho tar is liable to hum tho libi'o of the cover. This "i respondent is informed that a sat isfactory waterproof cover cannot bo made from hossian, and in the long run it is clio:i[>er to get a canvas cover, and Vive it passed through a solution to make it .rotproof. With oare such a co '"i" lasts for years. A process of wait "proofing worth a trial is as fol lows: -Ingredients: 2 oz. soap, <1 oz. glue, I gal. water. Soften the gluo in cold vter, and dissolve it together with the snap in the water by aid of licat and agiiition. The cloth is filled with this soiu'ion by boiling it in tho liquid for severe1 hours, the tiino re quired depending .-uon the kind of fibm and thickness of When pro perly saturated ...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GOOD SPIRITS. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 24 January 1914

GOOD SPIRITS. In these days one important in gredient of attractiveness is apt to bi> overlooked; that is, good spirits. Ji I'CiTone recognises how much can be done to improve the complexion, or the hands, or hair or figure, by rea sonable pare and culture; but it is not so well understoocUhovp' much may be done l'or the spirits. Yet who would deny that good spirits, joie de vivre, brightness, a calm, sunny disposition, are eminently attractive? ' The first thing is to realise that good spirits are largely a matter ' of will-power, and have little to do with circumstances. No doubt it is hard to be joyous with the brokers in the house; but wo see every day that some people manage to bo cheerful, when cheerfulness would seem impos sible. And, as a matter of practical experience, we do not find that the women w\th whom tlio world goes well, who have delightful husbands and chil dren, good health and plenty of money arc the most serene. Nearly all cheerful people like their ^c!low-c...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ELECTRIC STERILISATION. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 24 January 1914

ELECTRIC STERILISATION, Tlio importance nowadays attached - a iter ago-long neglect-to securing milk' in a condition as nearly as pos sible free from disease germs of every kind gives special interest to a mode of electrio sterilisation invented by ;i Liverpool doctor. Hitherto tlio mode pursued to preserve milk in full fresh ness of condition for tlio considerable length of timo necessary for its distri bution and consumption lias boon l<j heat the liquid to a temperature which kills the microbes, and then to prevent the access of further microbes by se curing it in air-tight bottles, after which the freshness seems to bL* pre served indelinitely. An objection to the method is that the heating of the milk is in eireet a cooking process, which so l'ar changes tlio naturo of liio constituents as to render them loss readily nutritious. Dr. J. j\l. Beat tio, of Liverpool, however, sterilises the milk by clectric current, and thus avoids heating it. at all.

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PIGS AS BAROMETRS. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 24 January 1914

PIGS AS BAR0METR5. Probably, tho last tinng that ono would expect to indicate changes in the weather is a pig's tail. However, according to the skipper of a Nor wegian sailing ship, who usually has a porker or two on board, 0110 could ! scarcely have a more reliable barom otoi- WJien a weather disturbance is coming on, tho tails of Mm pigs, usually kinky, straighten .out anl their ears droop. With the barometer reading between 29.DO and 30 the tails begin to forecast approach of a trough j of low pressure. When the reading I gets below 29.50 tho pigs seek cover, j and the storm is pretty sure to burst i within live hours. But a high baro meter puts a boautiful twist in the tails, and tho ears stand jauntily stiff "ud with a trifle of a cant forward.

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BARBED WIRE CUTS. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 24 January 1914

BARBED WIRE CUTS. l<\inn animals arc always marc <n less liable to injury from wire outs, and it is important to give quick at tention to all suck injuries. AVlien tlio wound is severe it will pay to em ploy a veterinarian to dress the wound. \Vliero the services uf a good veterin arian cannot be obtained, farmers WUj have to liandlo the case themselves. The ordinary nvound will heal if not interfered with. This interference may be from germs, parasites, med dling with tlio wound, 011 tlio part ol tlic man or tlio animal itself. Tho lirst thing to do is to stop the hemorr hage. This can be accomplished by a tight band of clean, white muslin, applied either over or above the wound. A thread may be used un der the artery by using a needle, and tied. Do not use hour, dirt, coo webs, or anything of that sort 011 tlio wound. They are unnecessary anil may product* a serious infection of the wound. Having checked tho bleed ing, remove tho clots of blood and cut o/F th...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CROSS-LEGGED HABIT. PERSONS WHO SIT CARELESSLY. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 24 January 1914

CROSS-LEGGED HABIT. PERSONS WHO SIT CAllELESSLl. Fully 80 per cent, of travellers by tramway car and omnibus sit cross legged. 'J,'hat is the opinion of a cor respondent who has taken particular notice of his fellow passengers. Tiio cross-logged habit when you sit down is provcoativo of grave harm to me body. Indeed, in time, a Lon don doctor who told "The Daily Mir ror," it produces varicose veins if tho person regularly adopts this and no other attitude. "Tho objection I see to tho habit," he said, "is that the return flow of blood from the leg is stopped at tho knee, the result being that the veins in the leg swell up. "All tho weight is thrown upon one sido of tho body, and tho under Kg 'goes to sleep' owing to tho pres sure put on tho sciatic nerve. The body should be equally balanced. "There is another danger I ought to point out. If you sit cross-legged you become lop-sided. "Personally I never do this. I always let the legs rest limply-stretch ed out is just as good. The mus...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
YET ANOTHER CAT STORY. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 24 January 1914

YET ANOTHER GAT STORY. io the several highly interesting oat stories to which you Juivo already ac corded the widely extended publicity of your columns, I would liko to add another (writes a correspondent to "T.P's. Weekly.") When living in the Midlands, we had as a household pet, a lino tortoise shell cat which had been with us from kitteiihocd. Out of a numerous yield of kittens, not one had resembled its in|other, and n'hilo they were sum marily disposed of, sho who had given them birth was retained, and kept the house and premises clear of vermin'. After several years, she appeared to bo suffering from toothache, evidence of which was forthcoming in a swollen face, always on tiio same side of tile l'ac-e, and which interfered with her pleasant facial appearance, as I have seoa the case witii human beings under similar circumstances. When suffer ing from these attacks, by her pitiful look up into our. faces she seomed to appeal for the help we could not af ford, but wo assured he...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FLY CATECHISM. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 24 January 1914

FLY CATECHISM. Where is tho fly boi'nP-In umnuro and filth. Where does the fly live?-- In all kinds of filtli and lie carries filth on .his feet and wings. Whore docs the Ily go when ho leaves the manure pile and tlio spittoon ?-iio goes into the kitchen, the dining-room and tlio store. What does the fly do there? - Ho walks on the bread, fruit, and veget ables ; ho wipes his l'eet on tlio butter and he bathes in the milk. Docs tho fly visit patients sick with consumption, typhoid fever, and ohol era- infantum? Ho does, and he may call on you next, carrying the infection of these diseases. What diseases does tho fly carry? Typhoid fever, consumption, diarrhoeal diseases, diphtheria, scarlet fever, and in fact, any communicable disease. How can the fly be prevented?-By destroying all the filth about your premises; screen tho privy vault, cover tho nmmiro bin, burn all waste mat ter, destroy your garbage, screen your house. Either man must kill the fly or the Ily will kill man. Preven...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A SWAMP SOIL. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 24 January 1914

A SWAMP SOSL. Some owners of swamp soil nr© puzz led by their unproductive character when first cultivated. Tliey reason that soils have been made out of vegetation and, therefore, slioukl be able- t0> produce plants luxuriantly. The truth generally is that a raw swamp soil is in an inert condition. The air has been excluded, aiid acids liavo formed, and bacteria Arc not at work. AVhen the water has been drawn off, tlid exposure of the soil to frost after autumn ploughing and a summer of thorough tillage does much to mend matters. A few tons of stable manure per aero introduce the needed bacteria. An application or limo sweetens tlio soil. The nitro gen in the swamp begins to gain av ailability. Usually, there is great deficiency in potash, and heavy ap plications pay. Phosphoric acid also is needed. Tlio first year should bo given to some bustling plant like maize that can help itself to raw and coarso food, and the tillage paves the way .for a more profitable trucking crop tlio...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ADVANTAGES OF CLIPPING HORSES. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 24 January 1914

ADVANTAGES OF CLIPPING HORSES. .First.-The natural process of moul ting or shedding the hair is a draft on the vitality of the animals. The ap petite is diminished, and with work or pleasure, horse exertion is irksome dur ing that period. Clipping of arti ficial removal of the hair accomplishes in a very short space of timo what Nature requires much more time to do. In other words, Nature is an ticipated in her work, and the ani mal's system saved a call upon it. Second.-A clipped horse is less liable to take cold than a long-coated horse, because the evaporation of pers piration is more rapid. A "hot" horse will cool out much quicker 'with a short coat. Every groom is aware, of this fact. Third.-A clipped horse requires less fuel (food) to maintain bodily licat than the long coated horse; therefore clip ping as a matter of economy should he generally practised. 'Foui'th.^-\A clipped Uiorsc lcioUs more cleanly, acts more sprightly, and keeps in better health. Horses in tended for th...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A TERRIBIE SUITOR CHAPTER XXIX. A FULL CONFESSION. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 24 January 1914

A TERRIBIE SUITOR I ,By Mrs. Harriett Lewis, Author "Found Guilty," "The Double Life etc.) CHAPTER XXIX. A I<\ULL CONFESSION. For a moment, Shawcross continued to look about liim with tlic wild glare of a hunted beast. Ho did not dare to ceturn to Maggie's chamber, lest slio should betray liis presence there, and deliver him up to his supposed enemies. His ono thought, his one prayer, was to see her, and beseech, her to deny all knowledge of his whereabouts. As . ho stood thus agonised, with a cold dew on his forehead, his gaze suddenly l'ell upon a half open door at the right of | tiio wide passage, and close at hand. , Through the aperture he caught a I glimpse of a liguted and luxurious boudoir, sueli as could belong alono to the mistress of the dwelling. Maggie must be within the room. Sho had said sho was going to Lady Dunmoro's apartment. It lie could only seo the gril, he felt sure she could savo him. These wild thoughts passed swiftly through his mind, aud, with a...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SPECTRES THAT STOLE MONEY. SAVINGS CARRIED OFF. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 24 January 1914

SPECTRES THAT STOLE MONEY. SAVINGS CARRIED OFF. The way in which a French family oi farmers called on "spirits" to aid them I in an attempt to avoid paying the rent ( is causing some amusement in Paris. Two brothers, named Guitton, occu pied. with, their wives and children, a small farm near Saint-Amand. One day they told thoir neighbors of in visible hands, which upset tilieir flower pots and disarranged their gardens. Mmc, Guitton, tho younger, said, too, that by night sho had seen through her window two black men-or demons who walked lip and down, easting cur ses at tho house. It was discovered 011 the next day that the family's whole savings had disappeared. Appeal wa.q made to the priest and to the police. But neither the Latin of the one nor the vigilance of the other (says the "Matin") could throw light upon the matter for the moment. Enquiries were continued by tlu police and the "stolen" money was found under a, staircase, where tin brothers Guitton had hidden it.

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 24 January 1914

AT LAST! HIGH-CLASS SWEDISH SEPAKA TJOIIS available at prices HXTHEltTO UNKNOWN. Our introduction of the NEW MODEL "VEGA" Has dealt a death-blow to tlio Exorbitant Prices charged by our Competitors. , MAKE NO MISTAKE! Tie New Model "VEGA" is r.o roughly and cheaply constructed separ ator . It has 110 superior in quality, aiid in price there's nothing to approach it. WE ASK all intending buyers to verify these statements, and thus SAVE MONEY, which is nono too plen tiful theso times. PRICES: 12 Gal. £3 15 0 28 Gal. £7 0 0 55 Gal. £10 10 0 80 Gal. £15 15 0 Energetic Commission Agents wanted throughout Victoria. Splendid opportunity smart salesmen ^'rito to-day. Department "K.P.,"' Buckeye Harvester Co 44 to m FRANCIS ST., MELBOURNE ?»3X!S'S PLANTS QRyS5\^VLl; Marvel. Each Hide Pot w}il» soil and contains 5Jvc tftOcfothat K:o'* vk(,n)U5ly iu 48 hours ahct cxino :r(1. throwing out lender £iecn shoots and parple adore! to ao amazingly »bort titat Hut »ai kaTccr, abort ir.rb hi^bt K^l^^/r...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IMPORTANCE OF REGULARITY IN MILKING. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 24 January 1914

IMPORTANCE OF REGULARITY IN MILKING. Ill everything {regularity .is> good practice, but in good dairying it is .im peritive. To products large; and rich yields of milk is the sole function ol 1J10 dairy cow, and to do this she must bo of good dairy typo, fed palatable and nutritious feeds and milked clean at regular periods. Aso a rule, tlio cow is milked at 0 o'clock of mornings in summer and 7 pr 8 o'clock in mornings in the win ter. Tlie very unequal periods are made for the cow by tiiis sun to sun milk ing, and as a consequence, the quality of her milk llow and the length of her annual period are reduced. The oow can do her best only u'lien milked at equal and regular periods of about 12 hours each the year round. The full supply of milk is not in the udder ready to be drawn out before milking time comes, but two thirds ox it is produced in the glands during tlio operation of milking. The ud der, .however, is usually lilled, and the cow becomes used tio this, but if the milki...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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