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Elephind.com contains 658,475 items from Columbia Daily Spectator, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,990 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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MUSIC AND THE DRAMA. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 March 1878

MUSIC AND THE DRAMA. A SEASON of Grand Italian Opera will begin at Booth's Theatre, on March 18th, with Miss Clara Louise Kellogg and Anne Louise Cary as primadonnas. The chorus and orchestra are said to be in excellent condition, as the management of Mr. Strackosh would, indeed, guarantee from the start. The first opera to be sung is Aide, in which Miss Kellogg is said to excel preeminently. We have no doubt that our musical readers will not let this opportunity for a rare treat pass by unheeded. We hope to have full notice in our next. THE fifth extra public rehearsal of Mr. Thomas was especially notable on account ot the rendering ot Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. For many reasons this will always remain to most music lovers the favorite work of the great composer. The grand measures, the sweet melodies, especially the charming Allegro and the Andante are enjoyable even to the dullest musical ear. The Andante, contains certainly the most melodious strain of any of the symphonies, an...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE LIBRARY. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 March 1878

THE LIBRARY. THE dull season of the literary world is now at its height, and consequently there is little to be recorded in new publications. On the other hand, new editions of standard books are coming more and more into vogue, and it is a very good sign that this is the case. The Harper's announce Mr. Green's second volume very soon, and have, moreover, a tine book by Dr. Newcomb on " Popular Astronomy " now ready. It is a lucid explanation of a difficult subject, and as such deserves the highest praise. We shall notice it at length hereafter. D. APPLETON & Cos. have ready the third volume of Mr. Martin's " Life of the Prince Consort,'' a book written by inspiration of Queen Victoria, and increasing in interest with each volume. "Chromatics," by Prof. Rood, will soon be published, as will a large, fine work on Chemistry by Prof. Roscoe. GEO. P. PUTNAM'S SONS will soon publish Prof. Moses Coit Tyler's "History of American Literature," and also Dr. Newberry's book on "Ge...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SHAVINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 March 1878

SHAVINGS. HE crawled carefully up the steps of" her house, laid his little valentine softly on the door step, and with loud throbbing heart gave the bell knob a violent pull, then rushed frantically down again, almost overturning in his blind haste someone at the foot of the steps, who grasped him roughly by the collar with the remark, " Hullo! here, what the —is your hurry? Oh, it is you, Mr. Smith, what's the matter?" Before he had a chance to reply the front door opened and he heared her voice exclaim, "Why what's the matter, pa !" In the vain hope that she would not notice the innocent little valentine on the door step, he began to explain that his aunt was ill and in his hurry to call a physician he had inadvertently pulled the wrong bell, but was interrupted by the exclamation ? " Why ! here is a valentine ! Thank you ever so much Mr. Smith." Whereupon the old gentleman remarked with a sniff and a grunt " A valentine ? Hump ! you better run home, my son ;" and he ran home, but...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 April 1878

The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. II NEW YORK, APRIL Ist, i8;8. No. 13. Board of Editors, 1877-1878. FREDERICK W. HOLLS, '7B, Editor-in-Chief,\ CHARLES H. CROW, '7B, Managing Editor. J. W. SPALDING, '7B. J. FISCHER, '7B, S. of L. H. G. PAINE, '79- W. B. PARSONS, JR. '79. C. D. STARR, 'BO S. of M. M. BENJAMIN, '7B S. of M. S. B. POND, '79, Secretary. TERMS. Per annum, in advance, - $2.00. Single copies, - - - - - -15 cts. Subscriptions by mail should be addressed to MR. WM. F. MORGAN, Treasurer, 634 Fifth Avenue, New York. Exchanges, contributions, and all other communications should be addressed to THE COLUMBIA SPECTATOR, Columbia College, N. Y.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CURRENT TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 April 1878

CURRENT TOPICS. THE graduation theses of '7B have been handed in, and are probably corrected, and everything points to the approaching end of the term. The Seniors, having but six weeks more, are, of course, principally affected by the prospect of the examination, and it must be gratifying to the professors to notice how even the most inveterate "slopers " stir themselves up to some work in the pursuit of their coveted " sheepskin." Still we are no nearer the solution of some problems which puzzled us last October : —No signs of new buildings, none of the needed reform in the Senior electives, no substitute for Goodwood or Class-day, and practically no certainty about the Henley race. Each and every one of these matters could have been attended to had those in power seen fit to use some energy. As far as the students are concerned, they should at once set their brains to work 011 the most urgent subjects, the festivals and the boating question. Of the substitutes for Goodwood sugges...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
PRESIDENT BARNARD'S LECTURES. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 April 1878

PRESIDENT BARNARD'S LECTURES. ON March 20th, President Barnard, in response to a petition of the Seniors, lectured to them in Prof. Peck's hour. The President chose for his subject the Currency question, and proceeded to handle it with great ease and clearness. He began by speaking of the great importance of the subject of Money, and gave a clear explanation of the origin of this commodity, and its use in supplanting barter by sale. Originally, of course, all transactions were completed on the spot, and there was little or no trouble about the value of Money. As civilization advanced, however, many transactions had to be left incomplete, and contracts were introduced, admitting the element of time. These debts, or deferred payments, " seem to be the principal causes of all the present attempts at currency-tinkering." From all sides the cry is heard that the "debtors ought to be piotected , that the law should " ease the burden," or "reduce the oppression ' of debt, —a cry which assu...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE PRINCETON MASSACRE, '78. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 April 1878

THE PRINCETON MASSACRE, '78. [Speech before the Society for the Elevation of Education, by Ex. Hon. C. Cornicula.] [.Reported for the Spectator.] BLOOD has been shed. The mighty caverns and deep receptacles of justice bellow, and the strong arm of the Law is in a sling. Women scream through fear, and grasp their helpless offspring in their arms prior to the onward march of these cruel murderers. Anxious fathers, at the breakfast table, on reading the news of the bloody strife, throw up —don t be alarmed, my friends —throw up all business for the day, and telegraph to the seat of (war) (learning). Sweethearts rush frantically into their lover s arms bursting with thankfulness for the few, safe miles between them and Princeton. Mc—K-o-sh !! ! the cats yell as they scamper down the fence and claw each other a la rush. Princeton ! the bull-dog growls, as he bites off the ear of the innocent black-and-tan. The very trees which had begun to burst forth in all the freshness of spring, draw...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CORRESPONDENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 April 1878

CORRESPONDENCE. Mr. Spectator: — IT may seem early to speak of the final examination, but nevertheless I would very respectfully utter the hope in your valued columns, that the faculty will arrange the daily topics of examination for the Seniors in a well-planned order. It is natural that the most difficult topics should be disposed of first, as they, of course, are on the students' mind most. I would suggest the following scheme, and merely remark that it embodies the desire of every Senior to whom I have spoken on the subject: Monday, —Physics. Tuesday, —Astronomy. Wednesday, —Greek and Calculus. Thursday, —Political Economy, Latin and extra Physics. Friday , —Geology. Saturday, —Psychology and Chemistry. Monday, —Constitutional Law. Tuesday, —History of Philosophy. This arrangement will place the most difficult studies first, while allowing another Sunday to " cram " on Constitutional Law, provided any Seniors care to use the day for this purpose. On the whole, I hardly see how t...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
OUR EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 April 1878

OUR EXCHANGES. THE Besom has been improving in appearance, lately. We find that the matter of the paper is quite good. The following hint, to their own trustees, would be a good one to be made to the trustees of other colleges : " The study of Anglo-Saxon, which has of late come to be recognized as an important part of a literary curriculum, introduces the student to a field of learning, with which it would be both pleasant and profitable for him to become familiar. Every true scholar appreciates the almost immeasurable influence which ancient classical literature and ancient Grecian and Roman institutions have exerted on the development of modern culture. But there is another antiquity which merits attention. Of this the study of Anglo-Saxon language and literature gives a partial view. But this language and literature can never be fully appreciated, nor their historical significance understood, without a knowledge of that whole field of ancient literature of which the Anglo-Saxon ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
ABOUT COLLEGE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 April 1878

ABOUT COLLEGE. The Base-Ball Meeting. AT a meeting of the Base-Ball Association, held Tuesday, March 19th, Mr. Bangs, 78 in the chair, a Constitution and By-Laws were adopted, the Association was named the " Columbia College BaseBall Association," and the following officers were elected : DIRECTORS: Mr. C. F. HOFFMAN, Jr., '7B. Mr. C. E. CORNELL, '79, Mr W. F. MORGAN, 'BO. OFFICERS T Mr. F. S. BANGS, '7B. President. Mr. J. H. MULCHAHEY, '79, Vice-President. Mr. F. B. TORREY, 'Bl, Treasurer. Mr. T. J. BRERETON, '79, Secretary. Mr. J. W. SPALDING, '7B. Captain. The next regular annual meeting will be held in October when officers for 1878-9 will be elected. T. J. BRERETON, Sec'y. AT a meeting of the Athletic Association held on March 21st to settle about the spring games, it was decided to throw them open to our Law and Medical departments and also to Princeton. This ought to make some fast work in the short distance races, as Flerrick of Harvard is at the Law School, and McCosh, Prin...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
IN "THE MINES." [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 April 1878

IN "THE MINES." CHROMO PHOTOGRAPHY. • Among- the many home-amusements for students, Chromo Photography is rapidly gaining in favor. The comparatively small cost of the material, the ease with which the art can be learned, and the beauty of the results all combine to make it a very desirable and instructive pastime. Moreover, the necessity of learning the art from an expensive teacher no longer exists. The well-known artistic firm of C. T. Reynolds & Cos. of this city has recently published a little pamphlet giving; all directions necessary, from the pen of Mr. W. H. Browned. They have, moreover also made up a box of materials, containing" all the necessary liquids, colours and brushes, and arranged so as to be a very convenient stand lor the work itself. We can assure our readers that both the directions and the materials are excellent and will enable every intelligent person to render his or her photographs as life-like as an oil painting, besides affording positive ple...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE COLLEGE WORLD. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 April 1878

THE COLLEGE WORLD. Amherst:— Prof. Zuchtman has commenced a course of lectures before the Musical Association on the culture of the voice. The Glee Club will give no more concerts in the winter term. In the spring term concerts will be given at Holyoke, Springfield, and Hartford. There were fewer visitors at the gymnasium during the month of February than lor any other month in the ten years the record has been kept. Blake Field has been rolled and put in shape for next season's games. The mild weather brought the nine out lor a little out-door practice, but they have since gone back into the Gymn. A party of Freshmen walked to Holyoke the other night to hear Bob Ingersoll, but ascertained too late that Bob held forth at Springfield instead of Holyoke, Weary and footsore the Freshmen returned, inwardly resolved to take their Orthodoxy straight hereafter, and not run after these new-fangled sensations. The Seniors will be allowed in the spring term, for the first time, what may be ca...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE LIBRARY. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 April 1878

THE LIBRARY. Digests of Law Studies. A REVIEW OF LEGAL STUDIES, comprising the most material parts, rules, doctrines, definitions, and principles of law contained in Blackstone's Com- mentaries, Evidence, Contracts, Pleadings etc., including parties to action, forms of actions, and the law of contracts in its widest extent. Compiled from standard works used in reading law. For law students preparing for examination and admission to the Bar. By ULRIC BLICKENSDERFER, Attorney and Counsellor at Law, Chicago. E. B. Meyers, 2 vols., small 8 vo., 430 and 364 pp. each. Leatherette. Price $3-s°-2. Abridgment of Elementary Law: Embodying the General Principles, Rules and Definitions of Law, together with the Common Maxims and Rules of Equity Jurisprudence, as stated in the standard Commentaries of the leading English and American authors; embracing the subjects contained in a Regular Law Course, corrected and arranged so as to be more easily acquired by Students, comprehended by Justices, an...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 April 1878

The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. II NEW YORK, APRIL 15th, 1878. No. 14. Board of Editors, 1877-1878. FREDERICK W. HOLLS, '7B) Editor-in-Chief, CHARLES H. CROW, '7B, Managing Editor. J. W. SPALDING, '7B. J. FISCHER, '7B, S. of L. H. G. PAINE, '79- W - B - PARSONS, JR. '79. C. D. STARR, 'BO S. of M. M. BENJAMIN, '7B S. of M. S. B. POND, '79, Secretary. TERMS. Per annum, in advance, - $2.00. Single copies, - - - - - - 1 5 cts - Subscriptions by mail should be addressed to MR. WM. F. MORGAN, Treasurer, 634 Fifth Avenue, New York. Exchanges, contributions, and all other communications should be addressed to THE COLUMBIA SPECTATOR, Columbia College, N. Y.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CURRENT TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 April 1878

CURRENT TOPICS. WE understand that the Juniors are about to petition the Trustees to make Greek optional with Political Economy next year, or at least to arrange the course in such a manner as to make it possible for a student to take both Latin and Political Economy. We sincerely wish them success. The present arrangement has hardly one advocate in the College, and is universally conceded to be defective. Political Economy and Latin are both of much more importance to a lawyer or a merchant than Greek, and this, notwithstanding all the excellence of a course in the latter language. It is time, moreover, that our authorities should set down some principle of college government. Are students incapable of judging on the relative importance and utility of studies for themselves ? In former years this question was answered in the affirmative, and, accordingly all studies were required, during the whole course. If, on the contrary, it is answered in the negative, then all studies should ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
COLUMBIAD POEMS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 April 1878

COLUMBIAD POEMS. WITH the abolition of Class-Day the Columbiad Poem remains almost the only poetical honor in our college. This honor is rendered much higher and removed from class partialities by the selection ol a poet by the Committee, who have the best interests of their volume at heart. Class-Day poets may embellish their productions with dashing oratorical splurges, which cover so many faults both of sentiment and metre ; the Columbiad Poet must rely on the merit of his verses either for true fun or graceful sobriety. He must be prepared to receive the surname of Longfellow, jr., or Milton, and to look out for the picks and snarls of those who should chance to read the poem twice. The class of '79 has regarded these points, and it is to be hoped that the coming classes will be equally careful and fortunate. The Columbiad is now ten years of age. A list of the poets for the various years may be of interest to some. '69. Hal Allaire. '7O. Felix Adler. '7l. J. Brander Mathews. '7...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
ABOUT COLLEGE. Philolexia. The Prize Debate. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 April 1878

ABOUT COLLEGE. Philolexia. The Prize Debate. THE SPECTATOR WINS ! ! THE Annual Prize Debate of the Philolexian Literary Society took place at the Mott Memorial Hall, on Thursday evening, April 11 th. The question for debate was : " Resotved, That a suffrage based on property or educational qualifications should be introduced into this country." Mr. Spalding opened the debate on the affirmative, followed by Mr. Paine on the negative. Mr. Hildreth then debated on the affirmative, followed by Messrs. Parsons and Bliven, both on the the same side. After a short discussion the judges awarded the first prize of $lO.OO to Mr. Parsons, and the second prize of $5.00 to Mr. Spalding, both of the SPECTATOR board. A vote of thanks was tendered to the Judges, Prof. Van Amringe and Mr. G. C. Kobbe, '74. Mr. Goodwin was elected judge in the prize contest in oratory to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Dr. Quackenbos. Mr. Merriam has awarded the first prize of $17.00 for the best essay ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
OUR EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 April 1878

OUR EXCHANGES. IN looking over the Yale Cour ant, we find among the Yale news the following item : " The Columbia four are not going to England. Colgate wants to pull stroke, but Sage will not row unless Goodwin is stroke. Hence Colgate, who furnishes most of the funds, withdraws." Also, the following:— " Williams and Wesleyan are trying to form a new boating association of New England colleges. In case such an association cannot be formed, they will row a four-oared race together sometime next July." It would seem as if the editors only allowed a certain amount of space for news from other colleges, and put anything left over in the Yale News. THE Cocagne, the new illustrated Cornell paper, begins its journalistic career with a good number. It gives good promise of a success!ul future. THE system of "two line " notices seems to us to be rather too common among our exchanges. It seems to us that such a notice as : "The Crimson is interesting as usual,;" "The Era has an excellent num...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
IN "THE MINES." [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 April 1878

IN "THE MINES." THE metallurgical projects are to be handed in on the 15th of April. Then work on the Mining Projects begins. THE Civil Engineers of the graduating class have been making surveys for an imaginary railroad to be constructed in Central Park. CLASS photographs form the theme of discussion among the members of '7B. What is to be done with the money of the class association has not yet been decided. MR. J. N. F. JORDAO was successful in obtaining the degree in the course of Palaeontology and is the second person to complete this course, the former being Prof. A. A. Wright, '75. who now fills the chair of geology at Oberlin College, Ohio. Mr. Jordao is, however, the first and only student that has received the degrees of E. M., C. E., and Ph.B. from the Faculty of the School of Mines. THE Theses of the Civil Engineers of the class of '7B are: J. W. Davis Prismoidal Formula. \ Separation of Slate from E. H. Holden Anthracite Coal. Wm. Hollis Ventilation. O. F. Olmsted j Har...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE COLLEGE WORLD. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 April 1878

THE COLLEGE WORLD. Amherst: — $6,500 of the $15,000 subscribed has been paid into the fund for the purchase of the Shepard Mineralogical Cabinet. Prof, in Eng. Lit. : —" How is Spenser bound back to Chaucer?" Junior: —"By his tales , sir." [Class roars and Junior subsides.] Dr. Hitchcock is busy on a chart designed to show the comparative attendance of students at the New England colleges for each year since 1800, and the relation of the attendance to the increase in population. A Junior who evidently has over much confidence in man's ability to keep a secret, recently read to an edified classmate on pledged secrecy, the following extract from his adored one's last letter: "A man of your superior education and one so far exalted above my station I can never hope to wed, but when you are married I beg just one favor of thee, that I may be your nurse girl." Samuel swears he won't go back on her, for he adores her even as she adores him. The Seniors are to have great liberty in the cho...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
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