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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1895

The Indian Advocate Devoted to the Interests of Indian Missions. Vol. VII. JANUARY, 1895. No. 1. THE NEW YEAR. : Hoary old Time, with his wrinkled hands, has gathered in an other year to swell the record of the past. An other year with its sorrows and pleas ures, its joys and woes, its good and its evil, gone forever. Ilappy or miser able, well-spent or ill-spent, thrown into the scales of our good angel, or seized with diabolical delight by our bad angel, it is registered for or against us forever, to be spread before our eyes on the last day with all the other years which have gone to make upouroarth ly existence. To the young, it goes by almost un noticed and unlamented, but the old watch its dying throes with sad hearts, because so few are left them. And yet before the sun goes down on the last day of this new year, many of the young and happy who so joyously welcomed its coming, may see its end only in eternity. For each year, as it runs its allotted course, snaps the thread of...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1895

, Ifj-ft, 2 TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. It was ours once to us for good or evil, but it is ours no more, it is snatched from us; its story is told and done, but its record stands forever on high. We may forget the years, as they are numbered with the past; forget the joys and sorrows they brought, the good and evil we did in them; but there is One who never forgets, who holds the record of every year of every human life; and, perhaps, when the new year is born looks over many a record of the old with that same grief which wrung His heart upon the cross; for He sees the fulfillment of that sad truth which He read upon the scroll of all the ages, when in His last agony, that His suffer ing and His death wojild be in vain for many of those He died to save. "New year!" Will it, indeed, be a new year for those who have wasted so many entered upon with new resolutions, the J beginning of a new life? For who can say it may not be his last on oarth? the last to atone for many sinful and profit les...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1895

'mwfm0 vffyy i$py-WFr$T' THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 8 Bible to be man's only guide, when for fifteen centuries before the invention of printing the Bible was to them almost like a sealed book. The interpretation of the Bible was an extremely difficult matter. It would not expound itself to us. Each text in it was true, and car ried only one true meaning, whether that was literal or figurative. God would not preserve every rash man from error who proceeded to manufacture his religion from what he believed the Bible to be. Until we had its true meaning, the Bible itself was a useless book, and was oven pernicious and hurtful. In the third chapter of St. Peter's Second Epistle, we read these words: "As also our dear brother Paul, according to the wisdom that is given him, hath written to you. As also in all his epistles, speaking only of these things in which are certain things hard to be under stood, which the unlearned and the unstable wrest as they do also the other Scripture, is made by ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. boys and girls. She cared only for excitement. Her mind had become utterly debased and filled with un healthy longings and imaginings. To this same cause we believe may be traced a very large proportion of the youthful crime of the day. You can scarcely pick up a newspaper but you see an account of young girls, perhaps a mere child in years, absconding from home and plunging into the world and into debaucher'; and when the ante cedents that have led to this are sought for, in nine cases out often they will be found in the miserable, sensational, de moralizing, reading matter they have devoured. So with boys. Little fellows of eight, ten and twelve years of age, have of late been frequently arrested for at tempting crimes, which it might have been supposed none but confirmed des perate villains would have dared perpe trate. When questioned it has been found that almost without exception they were habitualreaders of sensational newspaper stories, dime novels, and ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. and, though somewhat pained by the wound through his head, set forth to find his comrades. As he reached the canon his horse shied and lost his foot ings. Horse and rider wont toppling down two thousand feet to instant death. in. Bruised and wounded, ho got up three hours later, and in a moment of desperation, rode off twenty miles to the cave where his brother desperadoes lived. As he entered, a long, low "hist!" came from the deepest corner of the cave. There was an instant pause, the flash of a bowie, -and Bill Dalton bit the dust, never more to rise. IV. Somewhat feeble, but strengthened by the fresh morning air, Bill Dalton left the cave next day. Ill luck attended him. Riding all alone through the mountains, he was startled by a horrible sound. Looking up, he saw an ava lanche! It came on with terrible speed. It reached him, pushed him into the chasm two miles below, and buried him under a thousand tons of rock and stone. Poor Dalton was dead! v. The next ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1895

6 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. chief, an old, patriarchal man, awaited his entrance into their midst with his people gathered about him. Mistaking, as was done in the olden time, the mis sion of the holy father, he wished to lay down his power and chieftainship into his hands. Like this great master, De Smet hastened to announce that the kingdom of which he was an humble ambassador, was not of this world. At the day's ending, 2,000 Indians recited a prayer and chanted a hymn. Within a fortnight the Flatheads had learned their prayers. At the end of two months 600 had been baptized. After a sojourn among them of some months, and a thorough study of the situation De Smet returned to St. Louis for assistance. The trail led him through tribes of hostile Indians. -His garb pro tected him and enabled him to reach his destination after much hardship. In the spring of 1841, with two ad ditional priests and three lay brothers, who were also mechanics, Father De Smet returned to his wards. TheBitter ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ture and painting, with the physicians, artisans, and artists of Rome. "When, therefore, in 3 843, De Smet sought help in Europe, Ravalli joined him, and left parents and native coun try never to see them again. His name is inseparably connected with St. Mary's Mission. Here he be gan his work, and here he ended it. From 1845 to 1850 he was at St. Mary's. When the mission was abandoned, he spent his years among the other mis sions in the mountains, and upon re opening of St. Mary's in 18GG, he again returned to it never to leave it more. Tall and somewhat slender, of bold, pleasing features, capable of bearing great hardships, bright and witty, Ra valli was known and beloved through out Montana for his unselfish life and noble deeds, Not alone the Indian, but the miner, mountaineer and frontiers man experienced his skill as a physi cian For over fifty years he lived and moved among them, and at his death a fine monument was erected in his mem ory. His utter help...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1895

LMtttt BBB8P3PoC1fai'"t s TfTjB? INDIAN ADVOCATE. one side of the open body-space used by the devout Indian worshippers, was a small confessional. The sitting and dining rooms inter ested me more than did the church. The former, not large, was plainly furn ished. At one side was an old-fashioned secretary, used probably by Father Ra valli, and in appearance as if he had but just left it. In a corner stcrod a single bed, and three small pictures were on the walls, one of which I recognized as a picture of St. Ignatius' Mission in the early days. In the dining room, scantily furn ished, an object of deep interest was a triangular cupboard, Father Ravalli's medicine shelves. Opening the door, there stood revealed a large number of vials and bottles, with powders and mixtures and tinctures, just as the good priest had left them. ONE FRIEND. The one straightforward friend who daies to hay "I disapprove, 1 censure, or I blame Some act of yours; some impulse gone astray, Some weak surrende...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 9 Saxons. No act of his career has had such momentous consequence as the conversion of those tribes. He himself considered it his greatest work. Quicker than any other tribes these rude Saxons caught the spirit of Rome, and their devotion to the world-wide church is the most romantic page in her history. This devotion continued as long as they held control of England. At this day, when the English-speaking nations are in the van of progress, it behooves them to remember with grati tude the noble character who gave them their first impetus on the path of religion and refinement. The other aspect of his work which stands with this influence over the Bar barians as most important, is his atti tude toward the economic-social prob lems of the time. He regarded most sympathetically the oppressed condition of the poor, and he did all in his power, while respecting acquired and legal lights, to help to his feet again the oppressed peasant. He heard person ally overy com...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1895

WWTU'J!!! I.J '.-,.. 10 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Tj Idiap jXdVocate Is a ltcvicw, published by the Benedictine Fathers of the Indian Territory, to plctid the cause of the last remnants of the Indian tribes, and to give a history of their progress toward civilization. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of each tribe; their progress in education and religion; their occupa tions, Industries, schools, etc., etc. Also, n history of our mis sions, statistics, and other interesting matter that can not be found In any other publication. The proceeds of this Review will be used for educating and converting the Indians of the Territory. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, Sacred Heart Post Ofllce, Oklahoma Territory. Appkovkd by Right Rev. THEO. MEERSCHAERT, Vicar Apostolic of Oklahoma and Indian Tmuutoky. Subscriptions SO Cents per Ycttr. Single Uopirs 15 Cent JANUARY, 1895. EDITORIAL AND LOCAL. The Benedictines have been invited to keep daily choir in the stalls of the grand Cathedral of We...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 11 you explain why some cows have horns and others not?", "I mean I don't believe anything I can't see." . "Have you ever seen your backbone?" Our sentiments, our thoughts, our words lose their rectitude on entering certain minds, just as sticks plunged into the water look bent. The editor has been absent from home these past three months. lie apologizes for the late appearance of the Advocate but he is fully con vinced that his readers will pardon him if they know the cause of the delay. Our schools, I am happy to state, are in a flourishing condition. Both the College and the Indian Industrial Schools are well attended. Thanks to the able management of skillful teachers and educators, our pupils have made wonderful progress. The College has 33 pupijs, the In dian School 30. J God bless the man agers and tlie" pupils. St. Mary's Academy is nut behind the times by no means, the good Sisters have 62 pupils. It is useless to speak about the skill of the Sisters of...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1895

M THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. I S Through some misunderstanding the copies of this issue did not go to print, hence the delay. TRUE FRIENDSHIP. BY S. M. C. You ask mo to write on a wonderful theme The holiest creature can know, The beautiful sunshine that lights the dark stream When the current of life doth glow. To tell you my thoughts as they surge from the heart, Impulsive, unfettered, and free, With never a trace of the polishing art That often around us we see. True friendship is calm as the heavens above, And deep as the depths of the sea; 'Tis truer and sweeter, less selfish than love, More loyal and constant 'twill be. 'Tis nobler than love, for it claims but a part In the life and the thoughts of a friend; It asks but a place in the genuine heart, A remembrance that life cannot end. It is deeper than love; 'tis a life not a flame, Unchanging and faithful and true; In sunshine and shadow, 'tis ever the same, It leaves not the old for the new. "What is friendship? you ask: 'Tis a mu...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 13 ' y i Rev. "Bishop. Thus'closed a beautiful day for the annals of the Catholic Church of Tecumseh. The new Church was dedicated to Our Lady of the Holy Rosary. It is a handsome little edifice, 28x40; a credit to the town, to the Catholics, and also to the pastor, Rev. Leo Gariador,O.S.B. It is nicely finished; enriched with a beautiful altar, built at Council Bluffs, Iowa, and which would not be out of place in a town of the east. It required hard work and patience to carry things to the present condition, for the number of Catholics is not very lurgo yet in Tecumseh, most of the members of the congregation being scattered around in the neighboring country. Tecumseh is on industrious little town of 1,500 inhabitants, and only three years of existence. It is a county seat. An extension of the Choctaw Railroad is going to be built through within one year, which will add greatly to the prosperity of Tecumseh and of thePottawatomie county at large. The Indians ar...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1895

u THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. without this kind of thing. If the newspaper is an educator (and who will deny it), is it best to make it fit for the family fireside, or to pander to a vile taste for the sake of a few paltry dollars? Thoughtful people are awakening to the fact that the "educator' ' of the country the newspaper and the public school are not, after all, wells of truth and purity. There is more demoralizing trash put into the morning's issue of an en terprising daily paper than in a dozen dime novels. And yet the sapient father will cheerfully subscribe to a dollar weekly, rehash of crime because it is "newsy." It is very hard for a paper to be "newsy" and reliable. Still harder to be "newsy" and pure. A SHORT SERMON. Children who read may lay, This much I have to say, Eaeh day and every day Do what is right! Right things in great and email; Then, though the sky should fall, Sun, moon, and stare, and all, You shall have light. This further I would say; Be you tempted as you may...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 15 Church, which worldly interests had made him to leave. The: details of the sad drama are round in an authentic deposition, a copy of which is still preserved in the Vaticah Library. Other copies were sent to various personages of the Em pire. The learned Scdulius, during a sojourn he made at Friburg, in Brisgau, Baden, found there the authentic docu ment, studied carefully every word of it, and its value as a historic document and rinding it to be authentic, he pub lished it at Antwerp in 1G0G, in his "Prscscriptiones," calling it the "dec laration of the domestic servant of Luther, " heading it by the following title: "A sincere and truthful confession of a servant man of Martin Luther, to a pious individual, who had asked him in the name of religion, how his master Martin had died." The document is written in Latin, the following is the correct translation in English: "I must say that your religious con siderations and your entreaties give me courage to bra...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1895

w X6 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. "(- "- r$ . &?' W" 6- . t i ' K4.: i ', ?, pt-?; BS P fe.1. .' gv nounced to thorn the execrable end of Luther. "These, terrified no less than wo were, requestioned us at once, and by a thousand promises and solemn adju rations, to keep the most profound silence forever and forever, about this awful event, in order that nothing might be divulged . They then requested us to take down the horrible corpse of Luther and place it into his bed, and tell the people that my Master Luther had suddenly died. I confess that, touched by the entreaties of the nobles, and bribed by their munificent promises, we, like the guards at the Saviour's tomb, were determined to act as they wished, had not the invincible power of truth advised us to follow a different course. For human respect, fear, hope of gain, can sometimes hush the truth; but the voice of religion and remorse of conscience, soon or late, prevail over such oppressions." The deposition of this witness, the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 17 tude have been faithful; he knows that the innocent soul he has cherished is pure and spotless, and he fears to trust it where, with one foul pest-bearing blast, it may suffer death. To the thoughtful, God-fearing par ent it is a matter of weighty moment to choose for his child a school wherein those teachings of morality, those in centives to virtue, and that detestation of the shadow of vice which he has labored to inculcate, will be continued with the sweetness of domestic love and the additional force of experience. On the one side he sees the public" schools, wherein (and this we admit to avoid argument) secular knowledge is thoroughly imparted. On the other, schools established by his Church, taught by men and women thoroughly trained to their work for the proper nourishment of those most precious germs entrusted to their care. The atmosphere of piety breathed therein, the constant spiritual refreshment of good example, of religious instruction and the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1895

vWV ?JTV3p J xZS 71575 INDIAN ADVOCATE. ft ilMU"33ftjlf PBMJHBK3! gama. In the morning birchbark canoes were seen gliding swiftly along to the spot where the Chippewa mission was established, and where the first printing was done in this state. At an hour before sunset the place was swarming with copper-colored Indians and tan-faced half breeds. A large number of white persons were also present to witness the strange ceremony of 1 ave-taking. "aii old squaw, Pi-a-gic, bent. with age, was seated upon a small mound; around her were congregated the tribe. Not a sound was uttered for a quarter of an hour, save the crooing of the wrinkled old woman wJio faced the sinking sun; the others sat with their faces toward the east. As the last of the glittering sun was fading from view, a little papoose, at a sign from Pi-a-gic, brought a cone-shaped bark vessel filled with roots of cedar trees and dried grass and leaves from the graves near the old mission. This was lighted, and as the smoke an...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 19 The mouth thut belieth, killeth tho soul. Wis. r., 11. Devise not a lie against thy brother; neither do the like against thy friend. Bo not willing to make any manner of lie; for the custom thereof is not good. Ecd. xti., 13, 14. A lie is a foul blot in a man, and yet it will bo continually in the mouth of men without discipline. A thief is . -bettor than a man that is always lying; but both' of them shall inherit destruc tion. Eccl xx., 20, 27. You are of your father the devil, and the desires of your father you will do. Ho was a murderer from the beginning, and ho stood not in the truth; because truth is not in him. When he speaketh a lie, he speaketh of his own, for he is a liar, and the father thereof. John vm , 44. Wherefore putting away lying, speak ye the truth every man with his neigh bor. Ephes. iv., 25. Without are dogs, and sorcerers, and unchaste, and murderers, and 'servers of idols, and every one that loveth and maketh a lie. Apoc xxn., 15. Fide...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1895

,twrtFW If'IIIPWpllE ps : '? THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. w .TMg jApgel of jpargatory. HOW MANY HWKICT HKMINlHUI'NChS THIS TITI.1C IthCAMJJ TO A CllltlBlIAN MINI). THE SAINTS AND PURdATORY. 1IY KI.I.A AM.KN 81 AltH. , To know tho mind of the saints, is to como very close to tho mind of tho Church itself; and very often to know tho action of tho saints in the a flairs of their day, would throw more light upon historical questions than tho reading of many, so-called, standard works. Those, to whom tho more mention of tho'namo of Savonarola brings a stab of anxious scruple as to what ho was and what ho was not, and this after a curoful reading of Villain or his modern, interpreter, George Eliot, mny be con soled to learn, that while tho examina tion into tho merits or demerits of the doad Friar Preacher, was going on in the chapter room of his order in Santa Maria Sopra Minervo, Rome, Saint Philip Neri, that wonderful disoorner of Spirits, was on his knees invoking the aid of tho Holy Spirit o...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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