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Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 290 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 12 May 1894

Relinqu isli m en ts, . First-Class Homesteads and Desert Claims Located. Address A. BYKBS, KIONA. WASH., or A. H. DAWBON, Uottstein Building, Seattle. live WHI2WSD Fruit Growers . Who know what they want. They will find it in my stock of A 1, XXX fruit tree* and plants of all the best varieties. Catalogue free. Quick service. T. T5,. HOPKIITS, M and University Sts., Seattle, Wash. AC. FRY CO., Commission Merchants, —I)KAI,ERS IN — Green and Dried Fruits, Vegetables, Butter, Cheese, Poultry, Veal, Hogs, Honey. Hay and Grain haud'ed in car load lots on small commission. Consignments and corre spondence solicited. References: Mer chant's National Bank, Pickens, Fulton & Co. 92$ West St., Seattle, Wash. PA-WCETT BEOTI-IEES, DEALEItS IN — ■$* SEEDS, FARM MACHINERY 4$ and implements of every kind; also wag ona a».d carriages. Call and see us. say ing that you saw this ■ advertisement in The Ranch. Ist street. North Vakima. : : J. K. PERKY, . Sunnyside Irrigated Lands in the Yakima Va...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 12 May 1894

6 THE YAKIMA COUNTRY. [Continued from Page 3.] specialty. They yield largely, are cheaply grown, harvested and kept. Carrots and all root crops are count ed upon as certain, great in quantit) and superior in quality. The sweet potato, tobacco, all the small grains and garden vegetables "do well and prosper" excepting, per haps, the tomato, which of late years has been troubled with blight. But its culture has been by no means aban doned, and it is believed that the blight trouble will be surmounted. Now, "gentle reader," fill in a long list of other things, such as necta rines and apricots in fruits; peanuts, the mints, castor beans, chicory, osier willows, and a hundred other things of greater or less importance, all of which will thrive here as well as al most anywhere else in the world, and you will have an idea of the kind of country you will strike if you come to Yakima valley and buy a ten, twenty or forty-acre ranch and settle down to living. You will have to pay say $55 to $...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 12 May 1894

MANAGEMENT OF CREAMERIES. In starting a creamery, the stock holders must have a good working knowledge of the dairy business; they must have good cows, and take care of them and feed them. Enough milk should be guaranteed from the start to run the creamery to its capacity. The way to secure the milk is to take in as stockholders only farmers who milk their cows, not beginning busi ness until enough cows are secured. Get a man who can make first-class butter and cheese and who under stands everything connected with the creamery business, from weighing the milk, taking samples and testing it, to shipping the products. There are always a lot of fellows who think that because they own a share they ought to have a hand in everything that comes up connected with the busi ness. A creamery cannot be managed suc cessfully by a committee of the whole. A man should be placed in charge of the business who understands it, and he should have authority to conduct it according to his best judgment....

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 12 May 1894

8 THE RANCH. A Weekly Newspaper For Everybody Who Wants It Fkice —$1.00 a year iv advance. Woutii —Two gold dollars. Conducted by E. H. Libby. Managing Editor, W. W. Cokbett. Published by the YAKIMA PUBLISHING COMPANY. EDITORIAL OFFICKS: NORTH YAKIMA, WASHINGTON. business offices: North Yakima, YakimatAvenue. Seattle, Room 7, Hinckley Block. Tacoma, 1113 Pacific Avenue. RANCH SMALL TALK. Two rolls of good butter pay for The Ranch for a year. A box of good winter apples pays for Thk Ranch for a year. Two sacks of potatoes or less pay for Thk Ranch for a year. Iyet the coming" suns warm up the ir rigating water before using it very freely. Plant life is not suffering from drouth. The big rain of last week was fol lowed by cold, just as was feared, but there was no harmful frost from We nas to Kenewick. The late rains insure a great wheat crop and perfect grazing in the Horse Heaven country. Consequently there will be increased trade and traffic for Prosser and Yakima. Breezy these day...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 12 May 1894

PKOSSER. A COMING COMMERCIAL CENTER. Prosscr Falls Irrigation Canal—Prosser Falls Water Power—Prosser Town a Market Center for Horse Heaven and the Sunnyside. Moving1 white specks on the plains and hillsides, and tiny clouds of dust hang-ing- over them, excite the curi osity of visitors to Prosser in April and May. These are herds of sheep on their annual pilgrimag-e to Prosser for shearing. A thousand a day was the stint of the little bunch of ready wielders of the shears that I watched for a while, piling- up the golden fleeces. Some 50,000 to 70,000 sheep cart their own wool to the railroad at Pros ser, where more are clipped than at any other point in Washington. On the same visit bands of horses from the rang-es are seen coming down for shipment by rail to distant markets. Many hundreds find their way east and west from this point every year. Their home is the vast Horse Heaven country, an elevated plateau of a half million acres or more, where now are great wheat farms, whose ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 12 May 1894

10 THE STATE OF TRADE. It requires no reference to Brad street's or Dun to learn that the labor disturbances, the "industrial" army movements, and the still delayed ac tion of congress upon the tariff bill are having a depressing influence upon the trade and the man ufacturing interests of the country. Business is stagnant in all great com mercial centers, and country mer chants are ordering sparingly. This is the tale told by exchanges from all parts of the country. But there is an encouraging side to affairs. Old stocks are being worked off, last year's product is being consumed, rigid economy is allowing men to free them selves from debt and interest pay ments, and new crops are growing for the improved markets that must open next fall. The world is not going to the bow-wows just yet. NORTH YAKIMA MARKETS. Prosscr Markets Arc Practically the Same. Little change is to- be noted in most products. Burbank potatoes are scarce and have advanced tosll@l2 per ton for seed. Butter is a d...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 12 May 1894

POULTRY RANCH. four Poultry Editor is Harry 11. Collier, No. wiO U street, Tucoina. Address liini on nil Poultry matters.J FOWL PICK-UPS. Laying- hens should have an occa sional feed of oats. They are excel lent egg food. If you wish your boy to become at tached to the farm, keep a flock of fowls that shall become his very own. Grain as an exclusive diet is not g-ood for hens. Variety is the spice of a hen's life, as well as that of any thing" else. One hundred and fifty eggs per year is a very good average for a flock of hens. Some breeds will lay more. The litter on the floor of the feeding room should be frequently renewed for the sake of cleanliness. Provide automatic fountains with small drinking- cups for fowls with large wattles. Where the heavier breeds, such as Cochins or Brahmas, are kept, the perches should have ladders reaching to the floor. A board with cleats nailed across makes the best ladder. Fresh air is a necessity in the hen house, but do not allow it to enter in...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 12 May 1894

12 ONLY TO-DAY. Yesterday now is a part of forever, Bound up in a sheaf, which God holds tight, With glad days and sad days and bad days, which never Shall visit us more with their bloom and their blight, Their fullness of sunshine or sorrowful night. Lot them go, since we cannot relieve them. Cannot undo and cannot alone; God in His mere? forgive, receive them! Only the new days are our own. To-day is ours, and to-day alone. —Susan Coolldge. THE WIND RAN OVER THE MEADOWS. The air and the sun and the shadows Were wedded and made as one. And the winds ran o'er the meadows As little children run. And the winds flowed over the meadows. And along the willowy way The river, with its ripples shod With the sunshine of the day. And up through the rifted tree top*. That signaled the wayward breeze, I saw the hulk of the hawk becalmed Par out on the azure sens. —James Whltoorab Kitey. MY COWHOY PAR!) IN CHICAGO. Dave's Evening With French Opera iit the Windy City. ijy CAPT, FreD k. ki:i;d. [C...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 12 May 1894

and skill than the other methods of cooking1. Stewing must be conducted slowly and on the same g-eneral plan as boil ings The stew must be made the most appetizing- or the most repulsive of dishes. Prepared as the French serve it, a la jardiniere, the addition of a finely cut carrot, green peas, string beans and the sprinkling- of an onion, the whole browned and thickened with baked flour and served with small pieces of cut toast, offers a most tempting- dish. Hashing- meats is a fine art. Meat can never be twice cooked with out injury to the article; hence the process of hashing- should be a warm ing only. Perhaps the best way is strong steaming until it is completely warmed through. This completed, the hash may be best treated with a piquant ketchup of mushroom or tomato, and then be quickly served. To Make a Fowl Tkndkr.— When it is drawn and stuffed it is wrapped in two thicknesses of brown paper and tightly bound with twine so that none of the vapor or steam may escape. Ac cord...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 12 May 1894

i 4 OUII FUNERAL. A Frontier Reminiscence. ('apt. Fred R. Reed, in Prosscr American. During the construction days of the Northern Pacific railroad, many small towns were born that nourished until the road was completed—then died. The little story following actually oc curred, and made an impression on me that I shall never forget. To me there was a tinge of sadness that went straight to the heart. I occupied the exalted position of justice of the peace. Now, a justice of the peace in Montana in early days was a bigger man than the chief justice of the United States is to-day, and had a perpetual variety en tertainment. He marries people, bu ries the dead, puts out fires, takes a drink with 'everybody,, referees dog fights, settles family rows, preaches, makes speeches, and must be ready for any kind of work. For this aggrega tion of duties he is called judge; but if he rendrs a wrong decision his name is Dennis. One cold morning- I was waited upon by a delegation of gamblers, and in...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 12 May 1894

her past and save her for her soul's sake; would He suspend all rules, throw wide the portals of heaven, have sweetest music played on a thousand golden harps, and bid that poor, tired, sin-stained soul enter the realms of happiness, purity and rest? It was our funeral, because every body did all they could. There were but few of all kinds, to be sure, but all human with souls to save. There are many ot the old boys scattereed throughout the northwest who will remember that stormy Montana day, and how we knocked at eternity's door for admittance for that girl's soul, and all will agree that our knock ing- was not in vain—that the gates were thrown open and forgiveness an d rest came to her. THE WEEK'S WEATHER. The director of the state signal ser vice reports for the week ending May 7 as follows for eastern Washington: Too much cloudy weather, with very cold winds, seems to have been the rule rather than the exception in the extreme eastern portion. Not until the last day of the wee...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 12 May 1894

16 Irrigation is King and We are the People ! Our great $75,000 cash pumping plant is in operation, irrigating 3,000 acres of the finest land under the sun. Prosser is the commercial town of the lower Yakima valley. 50,000 sheep are sheared here. The great Horse Heaven wheat and stock country of 400,000 acres is at our back*. The wonderful Sunnyside region is before us. The Northern Pacific railroad runs through our midst. *Now we are going to develop the farm lands, knowing that the town will take care of itself. We are going to show our opportunities honestly and truth- fully, and we are going to help the people who come here. No fairy tales will be told. We are here to win, and those who come and stay with us will win, too. We will meet you half way on any fair proposition. Come and see us and our splendid country and opportunities will grow on you, and you will throw off your coat and go to work with us. Frosser Falls Irrigation Company, address, FRED. R.:REED, Manager, prosser,...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 19 May 1894

THE RANCH ONE DOLLAR A YEAR. WEEKLY. A Journal of The Land and The Home in The New West. VOL. 1. NO. 18. • PROSPECTS. As an aid toward attracting atten tion to the practicability of the ulti mate opening of the Yakima Indian reservation, the irrigation canals, for which bills are now before congress to permit their construction, will be a powerful factor. It is proposed to build these canals across the reserva tion to water lands to the south of it, though of course water can be sold to Indians. A right-of-way 150 feet wide is proposed, for which the Indians shall recover full payment by the ca nal companies, and they are to be al lowed to use the waters of the Satas and Toppanish creeks. The bills re quire that the companies shall make no effort to acquire any further rights or grants from the Indians. Of simi lar and equal interest are the small canals built and being built by the Indians themselves under the super vision of Agent Irwin, who has had $5,000 appropriated for opening...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 19 May 1894

2 people, governors and sheriffs to this organized system of plunder is a strange spectacle, and its result is a far greater expense than would result from compelling the "industrials" to work on public highways, etc., or go hungry. Yet many of those lately in Yakima say they would willingly work for 75 cents a day and board; while some aver that they have refused $50 a month to $2.75 a day. Allowing them to start from the coast cities was of itself a most selfish, if not a crimi nal procedure in the beginning, for they could only reach and do worse harm in the more congested east. If the movement had been suppressed from the first day of train and car and ride stealing in San Francisco, that would have been the end of it; the re sult is a big expense on its earlier aiders and abettors. * * * The lower Yakiina la pushing the ranching vigorously. Around Kenne wick the early vegetables predomi nate. There will be fully 150 acres in melons alone; 250 acres of early pota toes are up and...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 19 May 1894

Portland Dairy Produce. Butter —Oreg-on fancy creamery, 20 @22j4c; fancy dairy, \S((i>Y7l/ 2 c; fair to g-ood, 12^@14c; common, 10c per lb; California, 30@40c per roll. Cheese- Young- America, 12(rtl5c; California flat, \\y 2 @l2c; Swiss, imported, 2>o(it 32c; domestic, 16@18c. Eg^s—Oregon, 9@loc per dozen. Poultry —Chickens, old, $3.50 per doz.; broilers, $3.50^4.50; ducks, $6 per doz.; geese, $8; turkeys, live, 14@15c: dressed, \b(<t\7c per tt>. Butter is lower at all Sound points; cheese unchanged. San Francisco Wool. Spring—Year's fleece, per pound, s(d 7c; six to eight months, San Joaquin, poor, s@6c; ditto fair,7(a9c; Oregon and Washington, heavy and dirty, 6(n7c; good to choice, 7(V«)10c; valley, 10@ 13d Fall —Northern, defective, s@6c; Southern and San Joaquin, 3(rp4c. New York Wool. Steady; domestic fleece, 19@25c; pulled, 20@28c. The Hop Situation. The hop vines in this part of the country have made rapid growth dur ing the past week. Some damage was done by fr...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 19 May 1894

4 HORTICULTURAL NOTES. The Marion county, Or., fruit grow ers' union, with head office at Salem, was organized May 6. The capital is $5,000, in 250 shares. Subscriptions of stock are limited to one share for each five acres of fruit trees, vines and ber ries owned, or fraction thereof. Yamhill, Or., horticulturists will meet at McMinville May 25 to consider plans of co-operation in marketing- the fruit of the county, which is rapidly becoming one of the principal pro ducts. The fruit growers near Mount Ta bor, Or., are making progress with their fruit shippers' association. H. C. Welch was elected president and A. Rosenthal secretary. It is expected to include all of Multnomah county and vicinity. Forty-seven signed the membership roll. Action is proposed to secure a market place in Portland where all the fruit could be brought. A graded scale of prices for straw berries was discussed. It was said that the price of strawberries had been regulated by the lowest grades offered, while ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 19 May 1894

Relinquishnients, First-Class Homesteads and Desert Claims Located. Address A. BYERS. KIONA. WASH., or A. H. DAWSON, Gottstein Building, Seattle. LIVE WHIIW^O Fruit Growers Who know what they want. They will find It in my stock of A 1, XXX fruit trees and plants of all the best varieties. Catalogue free. Quick service. IBas , XX3smn 2d and University Sis., Seattle, Wash. AC. FRY &CO., Commission Merchants, —DEALERS IN— ' Green and Dried Fruits, Vegetables, Butter, Cheese, Poultry, Veal, Hogs, Honey. Hay and Grain handed in car load lots on small commission. Consignments and corre spondence solicited. References: Mer chant's National Bank. Pickens, Fulton & Co. 92JS West St., .Seattle, Wash. PAWCETT BBOTHSSS, —DEAI.EHS IN — .$* SURDS, FARMMACHINERY «$■ and implements of every kind, also wag ons and carriages. Call mid see us, say- Ing that you s-iw tins advertisement in The Ranch. Ist .street, North Yukima. J. K. PLHRY, Sunnyside Irrigate 1 Lands in the Yakima Valley, Wr c fo...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 19 May 1894

6 YAKIMA HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY. The Monthly Meet inn, May 12. There was a small, but interested at tendance on last Saturday. The ship ping association organization came Up for discussion. The criticisms that had been made on the great amount of the capital stock were answered by the statement that the interests of all Would be guarded if the directors and stockholders take proper interest in the framing" of the by-laws. It is probable that the amount of stock to be allowed to any one man will be con trolled by the number of acres in fruit owned by each member, as in the Yamhill society, which is capitalized at $5,000 in 250 shares, and the shares are distributed on the basis of one share to each five acres of fruit or fraction thereof. Another way sug gested was to the effect that each stockholder should only have one vote, regardless of his stockholdings; but it is doubtful if any one would invest largely on that basis. It was stated that the committee on the proposed cannery was ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 19 May 1894

THE INTERVIEWER. Fruit Growing on the Snake River—Va rieties and Management—lrrigation for Orchards—Distance Apart for Trees— Piece-Root Grafting—Best Three Va rieties, Etc.-A Chat With C. Q. Martin. C. Q. Martin is a new arrival in the Yakima country, though a resident of the state for many years, the last seven of which have been spent near Wawawai, on the Snake river. Pre vious to that he wasted a great deal of time trying to get rich by wheat grow ing in eastern Washington. Mr. Mar tin is an experienced fruit grower and an enthusiastic horticulturist. In a brief interview last week he gave his experience on the river of the tor tuous name. His conversation was jotted down in The Interaiewer's rough way, and translated reads as follows. It contains useful hints for Ranch readers here and elsewhere: Were you in a locality requiring ir rigation? I had twenty acres in or chard, ten of which were irrigated. What did you plant? Apples, pears, plums, prunes, nectarines, apricots, peach...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 19 May 1894

8 THE RANCH. A Weekly Newspaper For Everybody Wlio Wauts It Price —$1.00 ■ year in advance. WoutlI —Two gold dollars. Conducted by E. H. LIBBT. Miinaging Kdltor, W. W. Couhett. Published by the YAKIMA PUBLISHING COMPANY. EDITORIAL OKFICFS: NOUTII YAKIMA. WASHINGTON. BUSINESS OFFICES: North Yakima. Yukiina:Avenuf. Seattle, Room", Hinckley Block. Tacoma, 1113 P:icillc Avenue. RANCH SMALL TALK. A box of good winter apples pays for The Ranch for a year. Two sacks of potatoes or less pay for The Ranch for a year. Send us your name and $1, and re ceive Thr Ranch for a year. This is the season for brain work on the farm. Muscle work is all right, but it must be well directed, or results are not the best. The Pendleton, Or., woolen mills are in a rush of work. Between 400,000 ann 500,000 pounds will be hauled in there this spring. Kittitas county is talking up the state fair vigorously and proposes to "be in it" for premiums and for credit to her agriculture. The last few days of humid, war...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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