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Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 24 June 1897

land has been injudicious. The contour of the land, nature of the soil and availability of water make this section unique and merit the name of garden more than farm. The soil is easily wet, retentive of moisture, dries without baking, and is rich in well-balanced plant food. There is a combination of favor able elements, crowned by an ele ment of noble manhood and good citizenship that make the whole a source of pleasure and brilliant expectation. Some features of an irrigated district are prominently absent, i. c., the malaria-breeding pools of stagnant water, which are replaced by babbling streams,afford ing life and music to all they touch —and they touch everywhere. Many needed improvements might be suggested. More inhabitants are needed, and much of the good that rural life affords is entirely ab sent for lack of organization and mutual helpfulness. "Sunnyside shows instances of how closely retribution follows un wise action. It is coming out all right, however, and has a brig...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 24 June 1897

4 KITTITAS FARMERS' INSTITUTE. Continued from Page one. ranches of the valley with their big mortgages, are now owned, free of encumbrances, in 160-acre farms. The wool clip of the valley is assuming large proportions, and even the mountains surrounding it are grazed over by countless thou sands of sheep, which find nutri tious food in places inaccessible to other domesticated stock. Many are fed in the valley during the winter months, affording no small source ot revenue to the farmer with feed to spare. I must not omit the stream of gold that flows in from our sur rounding mountains and placer mines. But in Kittitas, with all her large and varied resources, there is none like the one which she seems pre-eminently adapted for by nature. And while the road to wealth does not seem so inviting as the tempting offers extended by some other lines, let me assure you dairying is safer and surer. The soil of many agricultural portions of the state, impoverished by years of cropping in one ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 24 June 1897

boys and girls to seek a livelihood amid conditions for which their ed ucation had given them no poise. "How can you have anything ideal in farming?" asked a friend whose life was one of excessive toil with little rest and recreation. I an swered that the system of education now evolving and seeking expres sion in our agricultural colleges, experiment stations and papers, the ideal part of farming, will assert it sslf, and in time dominate. Too long has the idea prevailed that education is not necessary for a farmer. "Book larnin'" was ridi culed. Now we begin to see that the most liberal education is a ne cessity, and the most successful farmer is he who has the widest range of thought on all matters per taining to his vocation —that the farmers' wife best satisfied with her lot is she whose education enables her to recognize the ideal possibili ties in her orbit and make the most practical application of them. To such Nature's power and grandeur are revealed every day in the chang...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 24 June 1897

6 ¥hs Hpiary. THEORETICAL IDEAS NOT WANTED. Jane Points Out the Errors of an Editor — Deserved Criticism. Editor Ranch*: and Range:— I saw an article in one of the jour nals of this state, written by the editor, and as he advances some new ideas regarding the manage ment of bees, I cannot forbear criti cising his statements a little. i. He "sprinkled flour on his and found them eight miles from home." He must have wet t\e bees first, as I cannot make the flour stick. 2. "If you wish strong colonies in the spring, never put one of the brood frames in the extractor.'' I think it an advantage to extract from the brood nest in some cases, to give the queen more room, where there is a continuous honey flow for four months. 3. "Wire your foundation in the brood frames —that is the only way to get them straight. If you don't you would better quit keeping bees,'' I would better quit, for I use no wire. I did when first starting in the business, but have better cards of brood without wire. I...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 24 June 1897

Poultry YarJ. THE LIGHT BRAHMA. An Article on the Merits of the B.cad - A General Purpose Fowl. BY R. T. CAMERON. The Light Brahma may well be called the shorthorn of the poultry yard, for it is the beef breed, if one may use the expression, among all breeds of poultry; no other variety is known to equal it in weight. The comparisou might well be car ried still further; for while the shorthorn is a beef cattle of the highest type, many strains of the breed are deep milkers. So, too, the Light Brahma is an example of productiveness in two directions, for it furnishes both a large frame, well covered with flesh, and a large number of eggs as well; for while it is generally considered that large size and and abundant feathering are likely to be at the expense of egg production, it is certainly a fact that a Light Brahma hen will lay a large number of eggs in a year if rightly managed. It is just here that the trouble usually arises. Comparatively few people under stand how to care for ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 24 June 1897

8 Ranche and Range. In the Interests of the Fanners, Ilortieulturists and Stockmen of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Utah and Brttlih Columbia. Official organ of the Northwest Fruit (1 rowers" Associntion- for Washington. Oregon, Idaho and Brlttab Columbia. Subscription I in advance) iIILLER FREEHAN, Address all eommantoattoni to RANL'HE AND RANGE, Box (MM, Nortb Yakimii, WaNliington. EDITORIAL NOTES. Every present subscriber of this paper should be an agent for it, and get all ethers possible to take it. State Dairy Commissioner K. A. McDonald has ap pointed Dr. J. B. Munly as his special deputy at Spo kane. Five million dollars will be paid out for cattle in Washington and Oregon this year according to con servative estimates of buyers. This money comes largely from the east. Once again the farmers of the Inland Empire look confidently forward to an abundant harvest. The crit ical season of growth has passed and aided by the re cent copious showers, the heads of grain are rou...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 24 June 1897

KITTITAS FARMERS' INSTITUTE. Continued from Page Five. edge will create them. Can we not foresee that if our boys and girls are equipped with an education which will give them an inspiration for farm life and enable them to plan their work scientifically that they need not be overburdened with toil and exhausted with the worry of uncertainty? Co-operative systems now being established will relieve the home of much that is irksome. The papers devoted to our interests are helpful and ought to be in all our homes. It is a part of the ideal to use such helps to educate ourselves. Knowl edge is power. The belief of some that farmers and their families are persons of very mediocre minds, to whom the names "hayseed" and "country Jake" can be applied, is a mistake. That their aspirations for knowledge are keen is manifest in these efforts to establish an institute where they can receive the needed knowledge they cannot leave home to acquire. We can set hens, and will not be unreasonable eno...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 24 June 1897

IO ¥tis Flocks. BEST SHEEP FOR THE NORTHWEST. "What breed of sheep do you consider the best for our ranges?" was asked by a reporter the other day of Charles McAllister, one of the leading flock owners of Yakima county. "The sheep that will produce a heavy fleece of good wool and also has a large carcass for mutton —the general purpose animal. The De I y aine Merinos and Rambouillets are my favorites.'' "Would you advise running pure bred sheep on the ranges?" "No; the cross with the ordinary stock on our ranges is the best. The majority of the flocks in this county have Merino blood in them anyway. This close system of breeding will result in the develop ment of size and improvement in the quality of wool and still retain the natural hardness of the native stock.'' "Ranchk and Range has been advised that one or two of our sheepmen are thinking of sending east for Lincolnshire bucks. Do you think they are getting the right stock for this country?" "I think not; for the reason that t...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 24 June 1897

Farmers' Protective Association of Camas Prairie, to keep the sheep off the range. J. M. Gates, of Kansas, is now engaged in driving 90,000 sheep over the trail to the eastern range. They are divided into several bands. These sheep were purchased iti Crook and Harney counties and constitute the largest single drive ever made out of Oregon, says the Vale Advocate. Arthur Kodges, county clerk of Crook county, Or., says Crook county has shipped not less than 100,000 sheep, and between 8,000 and 10,000 cattle this spring. In answer to the inquiry if the ranges were not depleted, he said that the increase for the year would counter balance the export. The Boston Commercial Bulletin of June 19 says: "The market con tinues strong. There is less specu lation than last week, particularly to territory wools, and this improve ment is distinctly legitimate, com ing entirely from the mills. For ordinary fine territory, 36c clean has been paid for large lots. The mar ket is distinctly higher than...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 24 June 1897

12 THE DEERING PONY BINDER. From the earliest days of the manufacture of harvesting machines there has been a demand for a ma chine of light weight and light draft that would handle the heavi est crops that grew. Farmers, dealers and manufacturers all seem to have a keen realization of the fact that the prevailing machines were necessarily heavy in weight and heavy in draft. Many attempts to make a light weight machine have foiled owing to the fact that there was net sufficient care taken Imitations Have Stubby Roller's at Buds of Shafts Only. in the study of the weight and strain under which a machine works, and owing to the fact that the at tempt was made to lighten in weight without simplifying in design. Farmers also recognized the fact that there was a great economy lost in the great height to which the Recent Imitations ofiDceri« K s Contain No Roller or Ball Bearing at all on this Important Shaft. grain had to be lifted from the ground to the binding receptacle, and for that ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 24 June 1897

it is in the rapidly revolving main gear shaft which bears the weight and working stress of the machine, that such bearings are most ur gently needed, and this is the very place where they are not applied in the imitating machines. The Deering Pony Binder has passed through five harvests, each one of which has added to the lau rels gained in the previous season's work. The Poison-Wilson Hardware Co., of Seattle, are the Deering whole sale agents in this part of Washing ton, and they will be glad indeed to send a catalogue of the Deering ma chines to any farmer requesting it. The Yakima Hardware Co., of Seattle, are the local sales ageuts. It is hard to persuade a grower to thin his trees, but no item of culture can be followed with better profit. Try a few trees, and leave others to their own way, and be convinced of the truth or the folly of the sug gestion. The bottom of the horse market has been reached in Oregon. Pub lic sales now attract crowds of spir ited bidders. In one year...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 24 June 1897

14 Briefly Said. "Yours is a first-class farmer's paper," writes Matthew Hickey from Mission, Wash. Be sure and have your bees in the shade during the hot weather if you wish the best results. The current number of the lowa Homestead gives the dates for 130 county and district fairs to be held this fall in that state. Is it any wonder lowa leads in agricultural and livestock interests? For thousands of years the fann er has been working with his hands, and others have to a great extent reaped the reward for his toil. Now he is beginning to work with the result of reaping the reward him self. At the meeting ot the state fair commission Saturday at North Yak ima Joseph Baxter was elected pres ident of the board, Dr. Gunn sec retary, and William I y ee, sr, treas urer. It was finally decided to hold no fair this year. It is time to think of the next breeding time of the ewes. If early lambs are desired the ewes should be kept in good condition all the summer. This forwards them for bre...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 24 June 1897

Markets. HIITTKII. «cattle. ranch 1-'i^l3c.; Was', cream ry 15@lb lowa creamery 100. Tttfomu, ranch ii: creamery li>«^. Yakima.' r nch I So. creamery 100. Spokane, creamery 20c. CHEESE. Seattle, new Wash, crenm lOQIIO Taooma. '• '• ...'Jo Spokane-Full cream, 12@13c. skim milk (J@loc. HONEY. Yakima- comb 10c. Extracted !•<•. Pugot Sound 12c. » Ilk-. Spokane " loc. " 12c. BOOS. Seattle '......: . 1 :;«- Tacoma.. •■ • ;v .' • Portland 2'j& {»«• Spokane Incite,. YaUirui • • ■■• >it! I'OULTUY. Chi kens— Sea tie I'ol' d"7-- S3@3..vi Ti.eoma " " SfT/^.IMI Portland " "' 'j-M" :!••»' Spokane .' •• " ■• l-»t)rtii..oo Ducks— :; - ;..«wo Seattle " •< 13.00 Spokane " '*..■» , Turkeys— Seattle perlbloe. Spokane '•'••• " ' *ie- Fit ITS. Apples- Seattle... .Yitkima and Wenat. hee |l.fio@2 Eastern 1.20 Taeom'a ....... Eastern Washington 1.75(??.2 Spokane 1.J0fJ.1.85 Strawberries per crate— Seattle S2iW> ; Tac - ma, 81,75; Spokane Yiikinia 75c. POTATO KS. Seattle East. Washington l...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 24 June 1897

i 6 H *?=* POLSONWILTON HARDWARE CO. lv /Is?' 821=823 Western Avenue, /^olr^v jjtt^^^^^^ Seattle, = = = = Washington. H iI^JM Wholesale and Retail. W^^^^^^^jm^ -^^_ FARM MACHINERY jS/ // W^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^fff Wagons, carriages, haying tools -~*^±&/ Js\js harvesting machinery, field and Deering Ideal IVcwer, Roller and Ball Bearings. garden seeds. PuiTipS, Wllld MJIIS, &C. Hi v 4hHC\^& S Pullman Sleeping Cars Elegant Dining Cars Tourist Sleeping Cars Free Colonist Sleepers TO ST. PAUL. cuookston; MINNEAPOLIS, VVIN NI PEG. DC7LUTH. HKLENA null FARGO, BUTTB. GRAND FORKS, Through Tickets to CHICAGO. WASHINGTON. NKVV YORK. I'UII,\I>; I.I'IIIA, liOSTO'I iii.-l M.I, POINTS KAST an. l SOT 111. Time Schedule: WEST-BOUND. No. I 1:1.) a. in. EAST-BOUND. No. 2 i::-0 p. in. Through Tickets to Japan and China via Tacoma and Northern Pacific Steamship Co For Information, rates, map«, time-cards and tickets, cull on or write G. A. GRAHAM, A (gent, North Yakinm, Wash. Or A. D. CHARLT...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 July 1897

Ranche and Range. OLnSEKIF.S. VOL.B, NO. 4<>. I NEW SEKIKS, VOL. 1, NO. 18. \' KITTITAS EARNERS' INSTITUTE. Continuation of the Very Able Address of Prof. VV. J. Spillman On "Principles of Tillage.'* Continued from hist week. Scattered amongst these little bits of rock are found here and there fragments of vegetable matter, such as bits of leaves, roots and stems, sometimes frag ments of bones, shells and other portions of animal bodies are found, but by far the greater part of all ordinary soils consist of bits of rock. The elements above referred to as essential to plant life are contained partly in these rock fragments; partly in the vegetable and animal matter, and in some instances we may find small Jpartieles of the nitrates, phosphates, potash and lime already separated from the rocks and organic mat ter, and ready to be absorbed by the growing plant. We are ready now to learn what is meant by available plant food. A negro may regard a melon patch as an ap- NORTH YAKIMA...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 July 1897

2 ADVERTISING OUR RESOURCES. Description of the Car that is Filled with Northwestern Products and Kept Traveling Through the East by the Northern Pacific Co. The World's Fair Product Car, which is shown on our first page is being used by the Land Depart ment of the Northern Pacific Rail way as an educational advertising medium. It is one of the two cars which attracted so much attention at the World's Fair and has since been replenished and fitted up so that it can be taken around the country without risk of injury to the contents. It is always ready for inspection and contains speci mens of the natural and manufac tured products of the different states through which the Northern Pa cific Railway runs. The car itself is constructed entirely of wood grown along the line and is a speci men of the high polish and finish of which the native wood found along the line of this road is sus ceptible. Of course, the agricul tural products of the country are those brought into chief promi nenc...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 July 1897

curing for his tables the I>est that grows. "I used to deal with the farmers direct," he said, "but the method was altogether too unsatisfactory. I have been getting my poultry, eggs, and some butter in carload lots from the east. You probably accuse me of being disloyal to my state because I do not patronize home people. I want to, but I simply cannot get what my custom ers must have. Take it with poultry, Do you suppose it would be possible for any poultry farmer in the country tributary to Spokane to fill an order for six dozen broilers of a certain weight? No one in the entire Northwest could fill it. Even if they did have the required num ber and weight of birds, it is doubt ful if they could dress them in proper shape for market. No, I won't make that last expression so strong. Leonard Schott, of North Yakima, sent me over a few weeks ago as fine a specimen of a young table fowl as I ever saw. It came by express and was dressed so nicely that I remarked to those who were ne...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 July 1897

4 KITTITAS FARMERS1 INSTITUTE. Continued from Puge One. the soil for their supply; and these processes grow slower and slower from year to year, as the more easily decomposed particles are torn down, leaving future crops to depend on the decomposition of larger and more refractory particles. We have here supposed that crops depend for their food on the mater ials originally in the soil. This is true only in new countries where farmers seem not to have learned that if one be taken from five only four will remain. A proper system of farming returns to the soil a large part of the plant food remov ed in crops, and thus keeps up the fertility of the soil, and puts off that inevitable day when fertilizers must be bought. It must be remembered here that the plant food contained in fertiliz ers added to the soil may or may not be in a form that plants can make use of. The question before us now is, what has tillage to do with the processes of decomposition that set free plant food from the...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 July 1897

mum crops is not based to any ex tent on our ability to control the temperature of the soil. There remain, therefore, only two factors in the production of plant food that we can hope to con trol to any marked degree; these are air and moisture. We will consider the least important of these first. We shall find that they are rather closely related to each other, in some respects. If air be excluded from the soil it does not stop bacterial action, but sets up action that destroys an im portant plant food — the nitrate. This explains why water-soaked soils sometimes refuse to produce crops when first drained. The nit rates have all been destroyed as fast as produced. The absence of sufficient air in the soil to support beneficial fer mentations may be due to two things—too much water, or too compact condition of the soil. The one difficulty is remedied by drain age, the other by tillage. The presence of too much air is injuri ous only in that it causes the soil to dry out too rapidly....

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 July 1897

6 Flocks. TO LEASE N. P. R. R. LANDS. Land Examiner }%. F. Benson, of the Northern Pacific Railway Com pany, passed through North Yak ima Saturday last, returning from his examination of the sheep graz ing lands in the Rattlesnake hills district. Mr. Benson informs us that he has completed the examina tion of the range being used by the following named parties and that on July 10, 1897, he will be in North Yakima prepared to accept applications for grazing leases 111 the district named: Vessey & Mcßae, 25 sections; Ilalstead & Wright, 20; Westou, Bean & Suiste, 20; Davis & Khiir, 9; Wm. Buchholz, 5; Chas. Porter, H; A. M. Cannon, 4; Hugh Gray, 15; C. A. Keeue, 5; Robt. Hamilton, 20; Campbell & Sons, 6tf) George Wright, 10. THE BEST DIPPING PLANT. An Indiana Man Wins the $100 Cup Of- ferod by Cooper & Nephews. After an exciting contest for the one-hundred-clollar sterling silver cup offered some months ago, b}' William Cooper & Nephews for the best farm di...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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