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Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1903

BURBANK'S HIMALAYA GIANT BLACKBERRY. This bulletin is issued for the pur pose of acquainting the people of Western Washington with a berry which, from among the various tests of varieties of black-berries at this station during the past three years, stands out conspicuously as one well adapted to this portion of the country. This berry has been examined during the past two years by many of the berry growers of the country and has been pronounced by all as a plant of exceptional promise. Origin and History.—Burbank's Himalaya Giant is a seedling raised from some seed obtained from the Himalaya mountains in Asia some eight or ten years ago. It was intro duced into this country by Luther Burbank, of Santa Rosa, Cal., who se lected the best plant from this seed and propagated it. Three years ago a comparative test of varieties of small fruit was begun at this station and a number of vari eties of blackberries were introduced, among which was the Himalaya Giant. These were planted in goo...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1903

6 Alfalfa as Feed for Breeding Sows. Does green alfalfa fed to sows with pig make the pigs without strength, hairless and fat at birth, dying within 24 hours? Does it hurt sows heavy with pig to bed then on plank floors? OLE. PELE. Answer to query No. 1: We have never seen or heard of any such weakness as you describe, but on the contrary my observation has been that sows running on alfalfa, exclusively, bring forth strong, vigorous progeny. I have also noticed that a much larger per cent, of pigs are secured where the sows are allowed to run at large on pasture. Answer to query No. 2: No. H. M. L.ICHTY, Sunnyside, Wash. At Ellendale Farm. The Ranch: -.Please credit enclosed amount on my subscription account. uur stock at Ellendale Farm is in fine shape. Have just Fold a pair of mature Duroc Jersey hogs to go to Beachview Farm on Whidby Island, and Mr. J. S. Klengard of Whitman county. Wash., today took away five as good pigs of the same breed as were ever seen west of the Rocky Mou...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1903

-WHAT IS MY OBJECT IN PRUNING THIS TREE." Editor The Ranch: Mr Walden in The Ranch of Feb. 1, makes some sage remarks about prun ing and without detracting from the ner'tinence and wisdom of what he says I would like to add some re flections on the subject. pruning— cutting live wood, is vege table surgery, and altho" books have been written on the subject, positive assertions, pronouncing this way right and the other wrong, yet we find that doctors disagree and we must draw our own conclusions, or do as others do, because they do it. My motive in pruning a tree would be guided by the desire to make the tree comfortable. The health of the tree is dependent upon this, and the qualities we desire and the market demands are only attained in propor tion to the healthfulness of our tree. Color, flavor and all qualities are sun products, dependent upon the ability of the plant to receive them. A plant that is sick or injured by pruning or in any other way, is unable to give us the best re...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1903

8 Horticultural Notes By F. Walden Hon. E. L. Smith of Hood River, Ore., stated in his opening address that the fruit industry had brought about two and a half million dollars into the state during the past season. He emphasized the fact that it pays to raise good fruit only. Some Yel low Ncwtown Pippins recently shipped to London, returned to him $2.00 per box. * * * The Entomologist of the Montana Experiment Station at Bozeman, said their worst pest is the green aphis— Aphis Malli—lt destroys young trees. Spraying will not stop it on account of the leaves being curled in such a manner that the spray does not reach the insects. He recommends fumigating with Cyanide of Potassium —says they find it the only safe remedy. The question was asked if the eggs of this aphis could not be destroyed. He thought spraying with kerosene while the trees are in a dormant state might ster ilize the eggs. This brought out the in formation from several members present that the eggs could be killed by...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1903

fruit growers was by President E. A. Bryan of the Agricultural College at Pull man His theme was "The Scope and Func tion of the Experiment Station." He showed that the Experiment Station is a modern affair and could not well be other wise Scientists had to discover and arrange the facts before the experimentor could turn them to the practical things of life. The work of the experimentor is two fold or should be. He must learn his lessons by experimenting, which the president styled the investigational and he must teach them to others, which he styled the instructional. The first step is important, but the benefits to agricultural and horticultural industries could not be very great, or would at least be very slow in reaching this end, without the instructional. Publishing the Bulletins helped in the instructional, but could never be effective in this work like the living teacher. Hence the holding of farmers' institutes is a most effective way in in structing men engaged in these i...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1903

xo Growing Onions by Irrigation. The onion in Colorado is no longer considered a mere garden vegetable, pays Denver Field and Farm. It has become a field product and a very prolific and profitable one, too. The bottom lands are those principally utilized for onion raising. These have become very valuable from, the fact that they will produce so largely of tnis crop. Improved bottom lands bring from $100 to $200 an acre. They are composed of a mixture of fine sand and black vegetable mould. The sub soil is of sand and gravel. The wa ter seeps outward into the underlying gravel beds, producing a process of sub irrigation. The land is usually pre pared in the spring, but is better when prepared in the fall or winter. The ground is well manured during winter with sheep or well-rotted barn yard manure and plowing is begun as soon as frost is out in the spring. A common turning plow is used and the ground is plowed about a foot deep. After plowing the ground is thorough ly pulverized with...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1903

BLANCHARD'S POULTRY NOTES. REGARDING BONE CUTTERS. Jan. 25, 1903. Mr. H. L. Blanchard: I wish to know if a bone cutter is necessary tor the best results in raising chick ens. I will expect the truth from you as you have had experience in this line of business, and have no bone cutters for sale. Very respt., JAMES BARNES. Genesee, Idaho. A bone cutter is not indispensible, but whether or not, by the use of one, better result? could be obtained I never having used one, cannot say. With us, it has been a debatable ques tion for several years, whether we ought to get one —or need one. Not being able to make satisfactory ar rangements with the butcher shop un der which I could depend upon getting fresh bone as often as once a week, we abandoned the notion of getting a green bone cutter. In lieu of the iireen bone, however, we buy the gran ulated bone and are well satisfied with results. It does not take very much of it. For our laying hens we use oyster and clam shells broken fine, like ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1903

12 not matter about exact dates in sprink ling, exact dates would be nonsense, but I can guarantee that you will do the eggs no harm if you sprinkle them with tepid water on the 12th, 15th and 18th day. Yours for big hatches, M. M. JOHNSON. Qualities of Beef Cattle. C. F. CL'HTISS. The milk producers of today do not depend on beef cattle for milk produc tion. The general impression is that beef and milk production are antago nistic and that a man who wishes to produce milk must, like the traveler at the branching of the road, take a dif ferent direction and entirely lose sight of the other. Milk giving is one of the characteristics of the beef breed in herent and essential for best results in growing beef cattle, not for the production of milk for the sake of milk, but for the manufacture of beef to the highest utility and profit. This is contrary to prevailing opinion on this subject, which is that the man who wishes to produce beed had bet ter do it with animals that have no tende...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1903

and the heat applied to them, still more I prefer a variation of tempera ture as the hatch progresses, for in stance 102 to 103 first week and 103 second week and 104 third week; this variation being due to the increased animal heat in the eggs as they devel oped. This temperature will bring good results. There are bushels of iron «lad •pres cribed rules about turning -the eggs just so, but my advice is to turn them as often as you have time and air them as often as you have time. I don't mean that it would be necessary to put in your whole time or even a tenth of it turning and airing the eggs, but I do mean that they should be turned at least once every day and twice every other day and that w"hen looking at the thermometer the tray should be pulled out and let the eggs get a whiff of pure air. Why? you sk. I will tell you. Turning the gg ripens it clear around, the germ oomes to the top; every movement of the egg makes a corresponding move ment of the embryo chick; besides ripeni...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1903

M SILO DISCUSSION. Following W. J. I^angdon's silo talk at State Dairymen's meeting, (see last issue). Q.: Do you think we can keep forty cows on forty acres with the silo? W. J. Langdon: Yes, I think so. Blanchard: I have been experiment ing for three years with a silo my self. I argued at first that we could raise roots better. It was my observa tion that it was too much risk to plant corn, owing to conditions here. I thought silo would be out of the ques tion. But after investigation we found peas and oats as advantageous. East ern dairymen use only corn. I have experimented for three years and lost every year except this year. I built my silo out of best material I could. After these trials I satisfied myself that peas and oats would be all right if we could get the silo made right. The silo must be air-tight, and it must be so from the time the silage is put into it. At first I argued that when I saw the steam coming out of the crevices that the wood would pwell and be come air...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1903

and 4V6 pounds of bran and 15 pounds of hay and 40 to 50 pounds of roots. Mr. Boissevain: If the farmer can produce good milk from the silage, there is no question but that the con densory men wnl have to come to the farmer. Mr. Elliott: I understand the con densory at Lansing, Mich., not only accepts silage, but encourages it. W. I* Benham, who is now at the head of an important irrigation enter prize at Spokane, was for many years identified with railroad interests, including responsible positions with the Michigan Central and Great North ern evidently became so used to the giving and receiving of passes at the beginning of each year that it has became ingrained in his nature. among the annuals received by the editor of The Ranch is one from the Spokane Valley Land & Water Com pany's lines, between all points in Greenacres' irrigation district reached by S. V. L & W. Co's main lines and branches. On the reverse side the conditions stipulate that "the person accepting this ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1903

i 6 GASOLINE ENGINE ON FARM. In a recent number of the O. .T. Farmer, J. M. Hendricks of New York gives his experiences with a gasoline engine of 2^ horse power, the cost oT which was $135. My experience with it, he says, has been very satisfactory. It has cost me only 25 cents for re pairs, and the machine does not seem to be worn at all. "Pump water from a bored well over 100 feet for all uses on a 300-acre farm. I keep considerable stock. The engine does it with ease. It has converted a dry farm into one amply supplied with water without the bother and expense of ditches. I have a large box 14x10 feet and 1 foot deep, lined with zinc. It holds about 14 barrels of water and I can and do have fresh and pure wat er for my stock that any city may envy. To pump this water by hand would be impossible; and, with a wind engine, it would be too warm in sum mer and too cold in winter, as you need to keep a supply on hand. I use wood altogether for fuel on the farm. The engine attached to a...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 March 1903

t ....i. -s-ott I..,, —- r • " *r ~a tj|l| HtH I "*~* I j I Hj-I" H s^^^^' ____=^..B jj===^M Vol. XX-Mo. 5 IMPORTANCE OF GOOD SEED. If farmers would more fully realize the difference between good and poor seed and act upon their convictions in the matter there would be more boun tiful crops to harvest and less disap pointed farmers. They are aware of the fact that "like produces like," and if they sow white oats they generally expect to reap white oats, although too little attention is given to varieties that are adapted to soil and climate. It is as useless to try to grow the large varieties of corn or grain upon light, shallow soil as to attempt to keep the heavy Durham cattle and Cotswold sheep upon deteriorated hill pastures. The crop should be adapted to the soil as well as tue animals to the pasture feed. The main suggestion we have to make upon this matter is the import ance of planting and sowing good seed. This means not only seed that is true to name but seed that has the ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 March 1903

9 DUTY OF WATER. Much useful information regarding the duty of water as determined by in vestigations in the irrigation of land in Montana and Utah is given in bulle tin 119 recently issued by the Office of Experiment Stations of the Depart ment of Agricultue. The object sought in making measurements at the experi ment station at Montana during the year 1901 was to determine the quan tity of water used by farmers in irri gating staple crops under usual con ditions. In selecting the fields for de tail work care was taken that they should represent average conditions. The fact was recognized that there is great difference in the efficiency of ditches, some by reason of their length and the character of material through which they pass, lose a large percent age of the volume of water which passes their headgates. Since it was desired to ascertain the quantity re quired to irrigate growing crops, the water was measured as it entered each field. In this way the losses of water by seepage...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 March 1903

tft RANCH A towu «f r n«LwKCwtflpm-iHTmftwJtoT- With which is consolidated ■ ha Washington Farmer, •he The Pacific Coast Dairyman, The Farmer and Dairyman, The Farmer and Turfman. >rti,..Ri oricau of the State Dairymen's Assocla- MoTaudtbVWe Block Breeders' Associ ation. M ,i.r.l^H KKFKMAN. - Kdltorand Manager. tutorial Offices: ■ ■ • Seattle, Wash Tel. Main 1266— Long Distance Connection. Issued Ist and 15th of each month. BUSINESS OFFICES: turtle . - Metropolitan Bldg., be " Cor. Third and Main Sts. Spokane - Alexander** Co., 621 FirM Aye " Subscription (In advance) f 1.00 per year. A cents wanted In every town to solicit subscrip tions, Oood commission and salaries paid. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an or dpr to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be notified in writing, by letter or postal card when a subscriber wishes his paper mopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot rt id It on our list from the name alone on the pa ,,,.r We ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 March 1903

4 WHAT RETURN FOR THE DOLLAR? lately Mr. H. H. Lyon tabulated the results from 100 herds owned by the patrons of Bainbridge, N. V., creamery and says: "The returns show an average profit of 65 cents per cow. The returns for $1 invested in feed is $1.0069, or an aveage gain of 0.69 per cent fo the 100 dairymen. Patron No. 8 has the high est gain, which is 67 per cent. The cost of keeping the cows averages a little over $38 per head, according to the most careful estimates we have been able to make. "Other things being equal, the silo men get the greatest profit from the expenditure for feed. It does not fol low, however, that all who have silos get a good profit. The grade of cows kept, the skill shown in selecting other feeds, and the care and intelligent at tention to the needs of the cow are large factors in determining results. "It is quite certain, I think, that the dairymen of this vicinity are giving more thougtit and study to the proD lems of profitable dairying than at any p...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 March 1903

POLLED DURHAM CATTLE. \t the recent session of the Stock-Breed ,.,-i,' Association, liclcl at Moscow, E. W. Downen, of Pullman, delivered the follow ing address on polled Durham cattle: There are two varieties of polled Dur hams, one of pure Short-horn descent and the other tracing to native muley cows of the country, crossed originally with register ed Short-horns. The pure bred Short-horns that have the polled characteristics suf ficently established to admit them to the pol ed Durham herd book are classed as double standard cattle, being eligible to both the Short-horn and polled Durham registeries. ()f this class I speak in particular. Prob ably QO per cent, of the double standard poll ed Durhams of today are descendants of ( lakwood Gwynne 4th, of the Princess lam ilv. as shown by polled Durham herd book. The earliest recorded pedigree in the female line known to Short-horn records, is that which is referred to in England and Ameri ca as the Princess family, dating back to 1760...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 March 1903

6 HOG CHOLERA AND SWINE PLAGUE. The annual losses from hog cholera in the United States are unquestion ably very heavy, although all diseases of swine are called hog cholera by peo ple not familiar with what scientific investigation has confirmed the opin ion of our farmers that we have a widespread and destructive plague to which the term hog cholera may be appropriately applied. The researches of the bureau of animal industry con ducted in the most thorough and sys tematic manner and with the aid of all the appliances of modern science have shown that there is another dis ease called swine plague which ap pears to be almost as common and fatal as hog cholera. Disease Are Similar. These two diseases resemble each other very closely in their symptoms and it requires an examination of the internal organs after the animal is dead and in many cases a micro scopical study to clearly distinguish between them. Fortunately we are able to formulate methods for the pre vention, cure and erad...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 March 1903

which may attack all species of warm blooded animals and sometimes affects the hogs in limited areas of this coun try. This disease does not spread from farm to farm with the rapidity nor to anything like the distance that is common with hog cholera. When it exists, cattle and sheep, and often horses, are also affected; and the hogs usually contract it from eating the carcasses of animals that have died with it. Anthrax is confined to certain regions of the country, and is seen in those regions year afte year. It is not a common disease with hogs. These are about the only diseases liable to be mistaken for hog cholera and swine plague, and as one of them has never been seen in this country, and as the other is infrequent and more often affects other species of an imals, it is plain that any contagious disease confined to swine which breaks out in this country is in all probability either hog cholera or swine plague. General Characters. Hog cholera and swine plague are both very fata...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 March 1903

8 Horticultural Notes By F. Walden The question has been asked me as to the best time of the year to prune an apple orchard. That depends. If pruning is done in the latter part of winter or in the early spring the result will be a wood growth. But if pruning is done in the month of June the result is the formation of fruit buds. So the rule is: Winter pruning for wood growth and summer pruning for fruit growth. But we must not be mislead by this well established rule. It by no means follows that when we prune in winter we will have no fruit buds. What the rule means in this case is that there will be no in creased formation of fruit buds as the result of winter pruning. Anything that mars a tree at the time of the formation of the cambium layer causes the increased forma tion of fruit buds. A dying tree will have more fruit buds, all other things being equal, than a healthy tree. It seems to be an effort of nature to reproduce itself before dying. Pruning is in some sense a war on n...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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