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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1988

PAGE 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY-FEBRUARY, 1988. mpsm MOUNT AIRY, N.C. 740 AAA NORTHWEST NORTH CAROLINA AND SOUNTWEST VIRGINIA'S MOST POWERFUL AM STATION [3038] K ; (919) 786-6111 (~> MJUIVZsOM* iB" sensor warranty up to 50% worn* • Exceptional wet-weather tracking • Delivers long mileage with day-in, day-out > control and driving comfort • Twin steel belts for strength, polyester plies for smooth riding A°a 140281 S,ZE PRICE /uiilllllT |IDV\ 155/80R13 $43.00 AIRY 165/80R13 48.00 TIRE & AUTOMOTIVE 175/80R13 50.00 I Hwy. 52 Bypass, | 185/80R13.!"'.!!!" 52!oO I (Behind Sky City I 185/75R14 54.00 BSjri 195/75R14 58.00 v esse! 919-786-4137 205/75R14 60.00 , v HA TSR!;:::::::::: till [N IRTH EUON] 215/75R15 64 00 TIRE & AUTOMOTIVE 225/75R15 66.00 iCQ AA MON-FRI 7:30 A M-6 00 P M L JJI / D l\ I ZJ 1"."" SAT OPEN 7:30) 00 919-526-1340 Hours: Daily 7:30 am to 6:00 pm . . c ♦ -7.1 A i .nn Where you always get Fnendly, Dependable Service, Sat. 7:30...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1988

BACKROAD (Continued from Page 22) 9.2 (0.4) To our right is an old abandoned farm house across the creek and meadow to our right. If you look behind the old farm house you can see two other old farm houses up the hollow behind it. 10.2 (1.0) On our right is another old abandoned farm house. Beyond it is another one up the hollow to the right. 10.4 (0.2) At this stop sign we will turn left onto Route \OO South and off of State Road 767. At this intersection we are in the community of Star, Virginia. 12.6 (2.2) At this stop sign we will turn left onto U. S. 221 North. At this intersection Hillsville, Virginia is two miles south on 221 to our right and Floyd, Virginia is 27 miles to our left, north on 221. 16.5 (3.9) Here we cross a bridge over Big Reed Island Creek. If you will look to your right up the creek you will see the base of an old bridge. That was once a covered bridge. Our readers might recall that once that this site and these old buildings scattered up the river here were...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1988

tu v m W tLVVj HEART OF THE BLUE RIDCE iAcuniain JANUARY-FEBRUARY £ 1988 (See "Dear Reader" note / // on Page 12) Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life PAGE 24 HOW TO FOLLOW BACKROAD TOURS. BACKROAD tours always make a complete loop back to the point where we started. The underlined numbers at the beginning of each paragraph indicate the total number of miles we've traveled from our point of beginning. The numbers in parenthesis () indicate the distance from the last point of interest that we passed. V & BACKROADS BIG REED ISLAND This month our BACKROAD tour is short and sweet. It will cover a total distance of 21.9 miles and will require less than 1 hour to complete. It will wind alongside of Big Reed Island Creek and by some beautiful old farms. This time of year the river is usually partially clogged with ice and offers some rare and beautiful photo opportunities. 0.0 (0.0) We will begin at the intersection of US Highway 221 and State Road 638 directly across from the Dugs...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1988

Hcfm™ ww'i! >*" (^V MTltf X T IAI Tn\T A T rvri »*/\iT*Tm A ¥»T T inn MONTHLY JOURNAL OF MOUNTAIN LIFE In March of 1983, three of us (Susan Thigpen, Charlotte Heafner and Bob Heafner) published the first issue of The Mountain Laurel. It did not contain "hard news". It did not offer potential subscribers future issues filled with sensationalism or political expose'. As a matter of policy political ads were not accepted for publication. In short it strayed from the traditional journalistic approach to publishing a periodical in newspaper format. The pledge made to readers in the first issue was to provide an indepth look into the everyday lives and traditions of the Blue Ridge and a view of the past from the heart of a region where old time values and traditional lifestyles still flourish. We envisioned a publication where everyday people, not necessarily journalists, could share the oral histories and stories of these beautiful mountains. Over the course of the last 5 year...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1988

PAGE 2 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1988 Mom made a little blue calico bonnet for me. The fabric matched my eyes and shaded my fair skin and blond hair from the sun. One warm spring day Mom tied the bonnet on my head and we walked hand in hand down the narrow Blue Ridge Mountain road. When we arrived at the door of Ma's (Grandma's) neat cozy kitchen she was busy but not too busy to visit with us. She gave me graham crackers and milk and poured a cup of coffee for Mom from her big blue tinware coffee pot that had been brewing on the wood burning cook stove. After I drank my milk I ran out to play under two big oak trees in Ma's backyard. A few days later Pop took me to visit Ma. I played in the yard all day while Ma did her laundry under the trees. She used her kitchen as a laundry room every Monday during the winter months but it was a warm spring day and Pa (Grandpa) had carried the large wooden wash tubs out in the yard the day before and filled them with water. The water soaked into th...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1988

THE HOLLINGSWORTH FAMILY This is the story our mother and father told us children about them when they first got married and started raising us children. When they first got married they lived with my father's parents for a while. My father bought some mountain land in Floyd County, Virginia. He built our house after they had been married several years. They had three children with the baby just a few weeks old when the house was built and they moved in. The house was just small. They went into the woods and cut out a place big enough to make the house and the yard. My mother made a brush broom to sweep the ground to make the yard. My father cut a little road through the woods to his brother John's house and one to the little spring house he built. My father worked in the mountains peeling Tan Bark and just came home on Friday evening and went back on Monday morning. My mother stayed most of the time by herself with the three little children. At first she had Uncle John's daughter t...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1988

PAGE 4 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1988 EDITOR'S NO 1E: The following is one of a series of articles written by Grace Cash of Flowery Branch, Georgia. Watch for more of her stories in the future. One Friday, in the winter of 1926, the Rose Killian Circus camped on the school ground. School had been canceled for the one-night stand to let the students attend the afternoon and night shows. I didn't have a ticket, but I got to go to the schoolhouse on Friday and see what I could outside the ropes. Tents covered the basketball court, and the barren, sloping yards all the way from the church across the road, down to every foot of the school grounds. Harsh recorded music blared blatantly, and circus-callers hawked various shows over large hand-funnel megaphones. There would be animal shows, and strange tropical birds and snakes and other wild creatures, all secured in cages. A tiger, watching me standing there outside the ropes, looked pleadingly through steel bars ~ as cagedin as I was caged-...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1988

W ______ * «J | S FLOYD COUNTY, VIRGINIA |RiPK|! 2 Local Arts and Crafts • Mountain Culture • Rare Plants • Abundant Wildlife • Mountain Farms • Fresh Streams J 2 Fishing • Hiking • Camping • Craft Shops • Country Stores • Bluegrass Music • Art Gallery & . 2 2 Friendly Country Folks f Restaurants • Lodging • Bed and Breakfast Inns • Bicycling • Christmas Shops 5 * • J Festivals • Picnic Areas • Historic Sites • Hunting • Swimming • Bird Watching • Christmas Tree Capital of Va. Mabry Mill, Floyd county (MHepost 176.1 B.R.P) 2 j HOW TO GET TO FLOvi) COUNTY, VIRGINIA: j~~~~ ~ ~▲ lnn~' 2 •From NC: Take either Blue Ridge Parkway or 221 North 30 miles from Roanoke, VA Blue Ridge Parkway NC - interstate 77 • iflVk r-J/ UU/l A ioLCI UJIJ 2 2 Interstate 77. Blue Ridge Piirkway traverses the entire county. S- 7>j • • •From Blue Ridge Parkway: North on Rt. Bat Milepost 165.2 I Miiepost 165.2 / j Bed and Breakfast 2 2 *From Interstate 81: Exit 36i(Christiansburg). South o...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1988

PAGE 6 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1988 Growing up in the Green River section of western Kentucky during the 1930's certainly had its positive points. The words "smog" and "urban congestion" did not even appear in our dictionaries. Crime was relatively unknown except for an occasional raid on someone's henhouse or watermelon patch. Of course, we had our compliment of local "characters". Everyone was known and spoken to on a first-name basis. You even knew your neighbor's animals by name. One such animal that sticks vividly in my memory was Beefer. Beefer was a Siamese cat belonging to Effie Smith, a middle-aged widow. It is not meant to imply that Beefer was necessarily better mentally equipped than other cats, it was just that he had learned to exploit man to his greater advantage. It would be invidious to compare the mental abilities of different breeds of cats. Most catlovers will arise in wrath to defend the mental powers of the breed they fancy! Beefer may or may not have been more ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1988

(Continued from page 6.) scream of anger that only a Siamese can emit, he leaped clawing and snarling at Mack's nose. Mack beat a hasty retreat. Fortunately, the two antagonist never made contact. Beefer's leash became entangled around the leg of Sister Macy Mize's piano stool. Sister Mize had been leaning back on her stool at a precarious angle, relaxing until her services would be needed for the closing hymn. Beefer's momentum was sufficient to apply the coup de grace to the already over-balanced stool. Sister Mize went backwards, her dress ballooning above her waist. "Any man who looks will be stricken blind," shouted Brother Lee. (More than one man was said to have risked at least one eye.) The calamity of the overturned stool brought John back to consciousness. Instinctively, he grabbed for the trigger of his trusty shotgun. Uncharacteristically, John, who was a skilled hunter, had left the safety of his gun in the off position. Blam! The gun went off with an ear-splitting expl...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1988

PAGE 8 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1988 We were standing on ground that was once as familiar to us as the back of our hands. Our little bare feet had walked on this same dirt thousands of times, and now it all seemed so strange. I felt a lump in my throat as we relived bits and pieces of our childhood, and tears dimmed my eyes as they searched for some familiar sights and found none. We walked down the mountain toward what used to be home. There was no road or footpath just a gully that followed the creek. We knew if we followed the creek we could find where we once lived, because this little rippling stream bouncing over the rocks was our lullaby in the winter months when the frogs and katydids were still. After a while we saw through the trees the top of another old rock chimney. We hurried on down the hill pointing out to each other familiar trees and rocks along the way. The house our Daddy built for us lay in a heap of rotting boards and rusting nails. It almost made me cry to see i...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1988

A Special Read Aloud Story For Children ON THE WAY TO THE CREEK Seth tiptoed down the stairs, quietly collected his fishing gear, and silently shut the door. He took a deep breath of the dawn air and met Bill and Terry at the end of the driveway. The three boys fished together every week. On Saturday their routine never varied. They awoke before dawn. Having packed three baloney sandwiches as usual, Bill set out to meet Terry, who always brought a jug of lemonade. They both arrived to meet Seth, who always brought dessert, at precisely 6:00 a.m. for their trip to Eighteen Mill Creek. They weren't the only creatures of habit awake before sunrise. They could always count on old Mr. Zimmerman to be standing in his front picture window like a sentinel. His house was immaculate and his yard was exquisitely landscaped. He became angered at anything and anyone that interfered with his perfectionism. And nothing, but nothing, escaped his notice. Every kid in the neighborhood was afraid of h...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1988

PAGE 10 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1988 This is a serialized, true story of a poor Ozark family in the 1930's through the eyes of one of their children. Experience their hardships and heart warming togetherness as they struggle through and celebrate life in the Ozark Mountains. March and April of 1936 was a mighty busy time for us. Papa and Ben would be out working every morning by daybreak. And at mealtimes they discussed what should be done next and how it should be done. Ben was acting just as grown up as Papa. Lots of times he'd tell Papa what would be best to do and lots of times Papa would even ask him. They had been working all winter gathering and fixing up all the plows and harnesses we had and all that the Shaughnessy's had left there. I heard Ben tell Earl one day that we'd have the biggest and best crop anywhere there in the hills that year, for we had two teams and old Maud to plow with; and we had more acres of level land on the Shaughnessy place to cultivate than we'd eve...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1988

OZARK DREAMS (Continued from page 10.) from all black, gray and brown colors. Mama's were pieced from blue, green and red and other pretty colors. Just then a white fluffy kitten ran across the floor and right behind it was a small, tousle headed, blue-eyed, laughing, rosy faced boy. Miss Bessie said, "Here's my little Joel. Joel come here and say howdy to Miz Duncan and Winnie." Joel looked at us with twinkling eyes and said, "Howdy." Then he said to me, "Do you want to hold my kitty?" and he put the kitten in my lap and ran out to the back porch. Miss Bessie said, "Little Joel looks just like my brother did when he was a little boy." Just then a funny, heavy voice slowly said, "Little Joel looks just like my Mama did before she went to Heaven." At the sound of that voice my hair just stood right up on the top of my head, but I turned around and saw Myrtle. She was sort of pale and shapeless in a too big dark grey dress. Her face was young but so old looking. Her eyes were sort of ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1988

PAGE 12 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1988 The Mail Box Dear Mountain Laurel, I have enclosed a money order for my renewal and the two Laurel Library collections. Thank you so much for The Mountain Laurel. It brings back wonderful memories of our travels in Virginia. In June of 1987 we went looking for Brother Bob Childress' Slate Mountain Church and there we met Judy Wood who told us that Mr. and Mrs. Hylton, down the road, had more information about the church. I spent a pleasant half hour talking with Mr. Hylton who tried to give me his big orange cat, and even I, a stranger, could see by the twinkle in his eye that he wouldn't part with that cat for all the world. When I saw the August issue with the story about Paul and Lillie Hylton it brought back memories of that very special summer day, and for this I thank you. Yours truly from Canada E. Fisher Ontario, Canada Dear Mountain Laurel, This [subscription] is for my sister. We grew up in that beautiful mountain side from Galax, Virgin...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1988

fjzp " | GENEALOGY The genealogy column is printed free on a "first come, first served" space available basis. I am searching the Board Family Tree and would like any information on Eli Solomon Board and Abigail (Walters) Board. Eli Solomon Board was born in 1819 and his wife Abigail was born in 1829. I would like to know where they were born and where they lived. They were married in Floyd County, Virginia in 1845. I would also like any information on their children: Jacob, Nancy, Henry, James, Stephen, Virginia C., Ester Ada, Isabell, Laura A., John M. and Joeseph. Their son Stephen was my great grandfather and was married to Julia Amanda Routrough. Any information will be greatly appreciated on any of these families. William F. Epling 303 Hull St. Beckley, WV 25801 "■nd Subscribe Today Send a Friend a Gift to The Mountain Laurel Monthly Journal of Mountain Life A 1 Year (12 Issues) Only SIO.OO With each subscnption we 11 send a FREE Complimentary Copy to one of your friends. Just...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1988

PAGE 14 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1988 In the spring of 1872, Mary Ann (W) Perdue, widow of Eli (as) Perdue, and her children moved to what is now called "Dogtown" [Floyd County, Virginia] from Franklin County. They moved into a log cabin about a mile east of Mount Olivet Baptist Church, in Roanoke County and toward what is now SkyLine Drive. This cabin is near Mill Creek. She had with her all the living members of her family, except Margaret Ann E. who had married Thomas J. Turner in the early spring of 1870 when the family lived on the Bluestone River in Mercer County, West Virginia. The Turners chose to remain in Franklin County. The immediate cause of the move was for Thomas De Witt (he was then 23), her oldest to obtain work for Peter Siner at the mill. This mill was located in a gap on Mill Creek about a mile southwest of Mount Olivet Church. Mount Olivet Church was located in a grove of white pines by the main Roanoke-Floyd road, now US 221, and on the Roanoke-Floyd County Line....

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1988

DOGTOWN (Continued from page 10.) Belchers, the Baileys, the Blankenships, and perhaps the Smiths and Hales, they formed a caravan and travelled west on the Byrd trail. They traveled down what is now New Boston at the Dan River fords. There John Perdue, several of his grown children, some of the Belchers, and some of the Baileys crossed over the Dan into North Carolina. The remainder traveled up the Roanoke River toward "Wood's Gap" now in Floyd County. When they nearly got to Wood's Gap, they found that the Indians were on the war path in the New River area (their original destination). They (most of them) turned north and temporarily settled in what is now Franklin County on the Blackwater River. Historians assume Meshack Perdue met and married James Dillon's daughter Eleanor (Nellie) Dillon about 1775. It is also possible Meshack moved with the rest of the Chesterfield settlers around 1765 to Wolfe Creek, at the west side of East Mountain and helped his father build a mill on Mil...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1988

PAGE 16 MOUNTAIN LAUREL APRIL, 1988 Dear Readers, I would like to tell you about a very special lady. For some of you, this is a first introduction; for others, who have been subscribing a long time, you will probably remember the two moving stories about her life that she wrote and we printed in our April and September 1984 issues of The Mountain Laurel. Her name is Olyer Turner. Olyer has suffered many hardships in her 78 years, many tragedies a lesser person would not have been able to bear. As a very small child of four and a half years old, she was put into a foster home because her parents were unable to provide for all of their family. She went to live with an older woman whom she called "Granny" who was good to her, but Olyer had to learn hard work at a very young age to be a useful part of farm life and pay her keep. By the time she was eight, and of school age, she was taught how to trap, kill, skin and dress the hides of rabbits to sell at the store to pay for her pencils...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 April 1988

When a person becomes a senior citizen, they should be thankful that they can get up in the morning. Tne next thing they should be thankful for is that there are things that have to be done to keep life g6ing and hope to have strength to be able to do tnem. Senior citizens have many memories of what has gone oii in their lives when they were young. There are as many things they would like to forget. Some they will cherish all of their lives. I have some memories about people and places way back in my life that I will remember all of my life with love and admiration. When ifriy family of eight arrived at the old Hatcher Place near Wool wine, Virginia there was a man named Montague Via who lived nearby. He was a JVlethodist minister. He was also our miller that ground our wheat and corn for bread. He was a big, stout man with a big goiter on his neck that stuck out and was very noticeable. He did not seefti to pay to much attention to that. He was always clean shaven and wore clean cl...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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