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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1998

May 1998 K^Hnn ■g / SB HP^H ■ [ '"^Sm ■ n. w 111r 7?57 iVp f y jPlf IBM School teacher grabs youngsters' attention By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist POWHATAN—Some shoved their hands impatiently into the air, while others just shouted out the answers. Their faces erupting with knowledge, Andrea Butler's firstgrade students named more than 25 crops that are grown from seeds. While in the process of identifying fruits, vegetables and other products that come from seeds, one student blurted out that seeds j?' * "^fc^ 1 fnH^Hßß|ffi| • «~*_2iS—--rr^-» «** \ \- : " \ \ need soil, sun and water to grow. "That's a good observation," praised Mrs. Butler. And, seizing the opportunity, she explained to the students that seeds don't necessarily need all three ingredients to thrive. "Did you know that seeds can grow without soil?" Mrs. Butler asked her class. "Some people at a college in Petersburg, called Virginia State University, are growing lettuce in water without any soil at all...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1998

Farm Bureau News ItjjjffliEf f ''j / rßrtr' t ~ t 1 • <1 *%9 ' You never know when you might need extra money.... We know how to help you get it. If you're a homeowner, help is just a phone call away. We can show you how to refinance all those high-rate bills to one new, lower payment with a bill consolidation loan — even if your credit is less than perfect! Look how low your total monthly payment could be * $25,000 $183.27 $45,000 $329.88 $65,000 $476.49 Payments based on 360 mo. @7.99%/8.38 APR Subject to credit - rates subject to change. Call today - apply by phone: 1-800-365-9017 The Mortgage Outlet, Inc. Multi-State Mortgage Licensee • 1800 Sandy Plains Parkway, Suite 304, Marietta, GA 30066 Poultry litter is beneficial (Continued from page 1) management plan, a soil analysis was done on their fields, and a sample was taken of their poultry litter. Based on those analyses, the plan says each acre needs six tons of chicken manure. The test results also revealed that e...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1998

May 1998 Alliances spread to Virginia cattle industry (Continued from page 8) and production risks. That is, the company doesn't pay for birds that die or for the costs of handling poultry manure. A drawback, however, is that a beginning grower might have to build a set of poultry houses that cost tens of thousands of dollars and he or she may not have the "luxury of testing the waters first," Banks said. While it's true that a poultry company will absorb drops in prices, the company also "knocks off the peaks when market prices increase significantly," he noted. A poultry company also may retain trade secrets and production management techniques, as well as the right to genetic improvements and brand names it develops, Banks said. Finally, a contract may allow authorized poultry company personnel unrestricted access to the contract farmer's fields and facilities to oversee production, Banks said. "Some farmers may want greater control over who has access to their farm," Banks said....

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1998

Farm Bureau News JET Playing the game Art James, at right, former television game show host, is host of a "The Gome of Life" during Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company's 1996 Sales Conference. The conference was in Norfolk March 19-21. Others shown are, from left, Jay Garnett of Henrico County, Tom Hall of Charlotte County, Tim Copeiand of Nansemond County Farm Bureau and John A. Johnson of Accomack County. Virginia farmers expect to plant less this year RICHMOND—Farmers who grow major field crops expected to plant less this year, according to the latest spring planting survey conducted by the Virginia Agricultural Statistics Service. In almost everything, we're down a little bit. But the survey is just based on farmers' intentions. —Steve Manheimer, state statistician "In almost everything, we're down a little bit," said Steve Manheimer, state statistician for VASS. "But the survey is just based on farmers' intentions, so it might change." Another survey was scheduled for...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1998

May 1998 (A Free Service to Members) Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau News accepts classified advertisements only from members of the Virginia Farm Bureau. One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each member. If the ad runs more than 15 words, then the member must pay $5. Ads over 30 words will not be accepted. I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please TYPE your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. (You do not have to use this coupon.) t Classified ads WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. > DEADLINE: Ads must be received by the STH of each month preceding the publication month. I Repeat ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each issue in which they will appear. > Ads MUST Include member number to be published. (For your convenience we are providing this coupon. Please submit ads to the Farm Bureau News before the sth.) NAME: MEMBER NO.: COUNTY: ADDRESS: CITY: STATE...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1998

Farm Bureau News AITC gets pledges, donations RICHMOND—The Virginia Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom has received donations and pledges from several agriculture organizations and individuals. Reaching the gold level, which is a gift of $1,000 or more, were Colonial Farm Credit and the Titmus Foundation. Lee County Farm Bureau reached the silver level, which is a gift of $500 to $999. These were donations up until April 10. The Virginia Corn Board and the Virginia Soybean Board have each pledged $2,000 for the next fiscal year to support teacher inservice training and the printing of new curriculum materials. The Virginia Agriculture Council has pledged $5,000 to help underwrite the cost of teacher training. In addition, individuals and businesses donated to AITC in memory of Archie Bailey, who died in March. He was a member of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Board of Directors. Those who donated were Dita M. Armentrout, Michele Awad, Mr. and Mrs. Roddy R. Crabtree, Mr...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1998

May 1998 El Nino may not make insects worse for farmers By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist RICHMOND—EI Nino has been taking the rap for all kinds of recent mishaps. But the warm, wet winter that resulted from the weather phenomenon hasn't been all bad for Virginia farmers. El Nino, a periodic warming of the eastern Pacific Ocean that affects weather patterns over much of the world, has been blamed for a record-breaking amount of rainfall in Virginia over the winter. January and February rainfall set 50-year records in most parts of Virginia, said jerry Stenger, research coordinator for the Advertisement Vinegar Melts Away Pounds and Inches ... Without Any Diet Gimmicks. Amazing And Ultimate Weapon Against Fat... CANTON (special) •• If you seriously want to lose weight and keep it off, take a look at vinegar. It's true! Vinegar expert, Emily Thacker says in her new book that vinegar safely helps speed up metabolism to burn unwanted calories, pounds and ultimately inches fr...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1998

Farm Bureau For more information call: I-800-229-7779 or contact your local Farm Bureau office and ash for our free brochure. I Over 12 Health Insurance Plans To Choose From. Not everyone has the same Medical needs... Plus not everyone has the same budget for Health Insurance...That's why Virginia Farm Bureau offers a Choice of Health care programs and options. Why pay for coverage you do not need? May IMB Volume 37, Number 4 You choose the health care plan that fits your needs... and your budget! ' *f£k^k f yjpp. wßbmJKp m HHS ■■■■ SB • - wMmKSBm 991 /' ' % Jfe -Illy i II' I 1 S- -.MMMI \ Bi finl 1 MB— ku h.mkA-.ißk M I M' IBHHH •f SSlPlfllllt s* yf ;: ImSMmBII \ ".. V". - -; 'fflßraraHMjjt. ~ -w ''■ J v ISglP^^Mßfp^ *<,'■' t **•»#& «• H-BR 8 / fijßSu,' if//. 11* > 'KT" HPhH - T 'l? ''•* .-*Bif -* , 1 WkM ./ /. iam ! . ... -*St®mm&£mk: $$* -# ' m iM It* Vole* of Virginia's Agricultural Producmn Health Care Coverage • If you are under ag...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1998

Farm Bureau Volume 57, Number 5 Tires are recycled for other uses By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist DINWIDDIE—Tractor tires can weigh hundreds of pounds. That's a lot of rubber to burn, throw away, or recycle. Disposing of tractor tires—and automobile tires, for that matteris not always an easy task. You often see the tires piled beside the road or stacked up in farm fields. That violates state law. Old car, truck and tractor tires are cluttering up rural areas because there's no easy way to get rid of them. But in Dinwiddic County, Farm Bureau members recently had the opportunity to dispose of their unwanted tires and at no cost to them. "I think we have a major problem with old tires across the country," said Dinwiddie County Farm Bureau President Alvin Blaha. "In rural areas, we have a problem because people in town want to (See Tire, Page 2) Tobacco impacts economy By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist A U.S. Senate bill to control tobacco sales may leave Vir...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1998

Farm Bureau News Tire recycling benefits the land (Continued from page 1) get rid of their tires and they bring them here and dump them." Most landfills will accept tires, but citizens have to pay extra to dump them. "Most people don't want to pay to dispose of a tire, so they just accumulate on the farm or in the woods," Blaha said. Robert Hall Spiers, vice president of the Dinwiddie County Farm Bureau, came up with the idea of sponsoring a tire disposal day. "I'm a farmer and I've accumulated a lot of tires on the farm," Spiers said. "I knew I was no different from other farmers." Spiers said he talked to the county's director of waste management about setting up a program for Farm Bureau members to bring their tires to the landfill. Farm Bureau is picking up the tab of $50 per ton. "Farm Bureau felt strongly enough about it to invest in removing some of the tires," Spiers said. "I personally cringe when service stations charge for tires because people bring them home and dump the...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1998

June 1998 Proposal threatens bankruptcy tor some With the U.S. Senate poised to tackle a major tobacco bill in the next several weeks, the implications of the proposed legislation are weighing heavily on the minds of Virginia's 8,000 tobacco growers, their families and their neighbors with economic ties to the golden leaf. Since tobacco is Virginia's No. 1 cash crop, and since the Old Dominion is the nation's second largest tobacco manufacturer, those whose livelihoods are Food safety law is still Washington 'ballgame' In sports today, there are two seasons: the regular season and the playoffs. So it is with legislation. What Congress does when passing legislation is akin to the regular season. The real games—the playoffsbegin when regulatory agencies write the rules that implement the laws. As in sports, that's when the going gets tough. Recent developments with the nation's new food safety law underscore that truism. In 1996, Congress unanimously passed the Food Quality Protection...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1998

Farm Bureau News Richmond to be site of dairy event By GREG HICKS VFBF Communications Director The Old Dominion's often overlooked dairy industry will honor its dairy farmers June 18 with a downtown celebration in Richmond's Festival Park, located adjacent to the Richmond Coliseum. The festivities are part of June Dairy Month, a national celebration that recognizes this vital industry which provides healthy, nutritious products for its citizens and contributes greatly to the state's economy. The public is invited to join in this salute to Virginia's dairy farm families and their industry. Family fun activities are scheduled from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. There will be an array of delicious dairy products to sample, dairy cows and calves to pet, games for kids and a milk mustache contest for all ages. Door prizes will be drawn all day long. The theme for June Dairy Month 1998 is "Milk, Where's Your Mustache?" which is based on the popular series of advertisements featuring celebrity faces. I...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1998

June 1998 Grants propel research on tobacco's new uses (Continued from page 4) the center's ongoing primary research in plant molecular biology. "This grant is for equipment, construction of a greenhouse and the purchase of one of the fanciest and coolest microscopes," Dr. Cramer said. The confocal microscope uses lasers to enable viewing of live plant cells and it captures images digitally, Dr. Cramer said. "We can tag proteins and watch how they move through cells. If you're trying to produce human proteins in a tobacco plant, you need to monitor them as they move through the plant cell." Crop Tech has genetically re- Are you 65 or over? Do You Know Who Will Pay Your Medical Bills? Dont count on Medicare alone...it wasn't designed to pay all of your medical bills. And in 1997 Medicare deductibles and copayments that come out of your pocket are higher than ever. Many American s have found out too late...and are faced with medical bills that can total tens of thousands of dollars*.....

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1998

Farm Bureau News Policy development cranking up By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—If you're a member of Farm Bureau, now is the time to surface important issues that you would like for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation to address. A major function of Farm Bureau is to solve problems of the members, and this is done through policy development. This is an organized and step-by-step program of gathering ideas and opinions from members on a variety of concerns. Policy development is a tool that gives each farmer a voice in the challenges that affect the business of farming. It encourages farmers to meet and discuss issues. "We pride ourselves on being a grassroots organization and policy development is how our grassroots organization surfaces issues that develop into our legislative agenda," said Martha Moore, VFBF director of public affairs. The legislative agenda is a set of issues that members take to state lawmakers for action during the Virginia General Assembly. Th...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1998

June 1998 Scientists work to improve tree health at center I • IHI WmHB&l Irm I H eHI j : f J '4f |^H8|■ HHor - U| Richard E. Kreh examines trees at the Reynolds Homestead Forest Resources Research Center, which focuses mainly on forest biology. «She wants to be a mom when she grows up. Me wants lo know when he 11 get lunch. You just want them protected forever. WUI »er if s protecting your juniilij {Jiromjli liome, aiifo or life insurance, we ve tjof fl*e coverage i|ou need io plan {or tke future. Virginia l arni bureau Insurance helps i|ou l>e there for tlie ones uou love. VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY • VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU TOWN & COUNTRY INSURANCE COMPANY HELPING YOU is what we do best. VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU FIRE & CASUALTY INSURANCE COMPANY • SOUTHERN FARM BUREAU LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY —— Editor's note: This is the llth in a continuing series about Virginia's 12 agricultural research and Extension centers operated by...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1998

Farm Bureau News Urban encroachment sweeping across Virginia By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RlCHMOND—Population growth in Virginia continues to push outward from cities to rural counties and this is creating challenges for farmers. Problems can arise as city dwellers move to parcels beside farms. New neighbors unfamiliar with farming are sometimes appalled when they awaken to the sound of a tractor in a nearby field at 6 a.m., especially on a Saturday morning when they'd rather sleep late. Newcomers to rural areas may also be offended by strong scents from farms, dust from plowed fields and occasional mud on a paved road. A slow-moving tractor on the road may interrupt their commute to the office. City dwellers typically have "a romantic sense of farming where they think the farm is small," said Martha Moore, Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's director of public affairs. "We have many small farms, but farmers are beginning to be more specialized and they're growing commoditie...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1998

June 1998 'Miracle bean' used in many products By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND —You wear it, walk on It, eat It, feed it to pets and spray it on insects. What is it? The amazing soybean! It is used in hundreds of products, such as cosmetics, linoleum floor covering, food, feed, insecticides, toothpaste and pharmaceuticals. The soybean is probably the most versatile crop in the world, and close to 490,000 acres of the "miracle bean" are harvested in Virginia each fall. Generating $95 million in cash receipts annually in recent years in this state, soybeans are grown by more than 3,700 farmers in the Old Dominion. The soybean is the state's seventh most important agricultural commodity and it's the third leading cash crop, following tobacco and corn. Eating the miracle bean could bring you health benefits. Researchers in recent years have found that eating soybean protein may help prevent cancer, as well as decrease bad cholesterol in people who have especially high le...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1998

Farm Bureau News Bay Foundation calls poultry farm 'exemplary' By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Editor JETERSVILLE—Seeking firsthand knowledge of poultry farming and the environmental challenges it faces, seven staff members of the Virginia office of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation visited an Amelia County poultry farm May 6. "It's important for people on all sides of the current debate that's going on to keep an open dialogue, and to have open and frank discussions" of the environmental issues facing the poultry industry, said Joe Maroon, Virginia executive director of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. "We learned more about the inner workings of the industry as well as the way the farm itself is run. Clearly, the Easters run a very exemplary operation," he said, alluding to the farm owned by Amelia County Farm Bureau President Jackie Easter. "I learned some things from them, and we exchanged questions, and I hope it was an educational experience for them," said Mrs. Easter, who has raised b...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1998

June 1998 Urban encroachment spreading (Continued from page 8) tion. In April, county officials offered Palmer a price that didn't include the value of his barn or two houses, one of which is 5,000 square feet, he said. Families live in the two houses, while Palmer lives off-site. Although county officials looked at other sites, Palmer's farm was the best site, William Irvin, chairman of the school board, said in an Associated Press report. It is large and flat, has good access to utilities because it is only a few miles from commercial areas and is in the central portion of a proposed high school district. Palmer showed no interest in selling the property, and then county officials hinted at the possibility of condemnation, Palmer said. "There was a veiled threat in all of the meetings to use the condemnation procedure by which the county would forcibly take our farm," he said. "We know we don't have a lot of flat land up here." The school board voted in late April not to start con...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1998

Farm Bureau News Soybeans may improve health (Continued from page 9) according to the United Soybean Board. These are used extensively in manufactured foods to help retain moisture, improve shelf life, add protein and texture, replace meat and retain fat in meat products, while also retaining flavor. Soy flours came along in the 1940s and are the simplest form of soy proteins, USB said. It's made by grinding and screening defatted flakes of soybeans. Soy flour adds protein and improves crust color and shelf life of baked goods. In the 19505, soy isolates were developed. Through a chemical process, most of the protein is removed from the defatted flake, resulting in a product with about 90 percent protein content. Isolates are used to add texture to meat products and are valued for their emulsifying properties. Soy isolates are the chief component of many dairy-like products, including cheese, milk, non-dairy frozen desserts and coffee whiteners, USB said. Protein drinks, soup bases ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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