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Title: Queenslander, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 730,560 items from Queenslander, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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LIQUID MANURES. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 2 June 1866

LIQUID MANURES. THE present time offers a very fine com-<*> bination of circumstances for the profitable application of liquid manure, which experience has shown can only be profitably employed after wet weather. In our climate at such a time they can and are used with more than ordinary telling effect; a fact of which many of those who grow for the Brisbane market are fully alive to. On visiting different gardens the different effects of liquid manure is wonder ful, even when used on similar crops, and under almost identical circumstances. From this the conclusion has been come to that the causes of failure are mostly attributable to using the article too thick or strong, under which cir cumstances it chokes up the soil, and actually does injury. One very successful user of liquid manure says "It should be as clear as a glass of wine," and that he is correct his crops prove. To be really effective, from whatever substance made, liquid manure requires to be clearified,...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
FAMILIAR LETTERS ON GEOLOGY AS APPLIED TO AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY. SECOND LETTER. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 2 June 1866

FAMILIAR LETTERS ON GEOLOGY AS APPLIED TO AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY. SECOND LETTER. BY DR. D. MARCH. FOR a good example of the changeful nature of the present state of the earth's surface, the River Brisbane will give one of the best illustrations that can be given. The eye will detect iv its waters during and after floods 1 immense quantities of mud besides much debris of different kinds; these are brought from the land through which tho river and ita contribu taries flow. The Brisbane at a remote period ; has terminated in tho sea much nearer to the | present city than it now does; indeed on the right bank of the river about a mile from Fortitude Valley, this is fully evident, but much more so, when we take the river from opposite Bulimba aud downwards, the new formations come at once to view. The soil of the banks, through whioh the river and its tributaries pass from their source downwards, are composed of lime, sand, and clay; and it is each contributing its share, that causes the...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
"A PLOUGHMAN ON A PLOUGHMAN'S LIFE." [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 2 June 1866

"A PLOUGHMAN ON A PLOUGHMAN'S LIFE." I am, &c., ONE UP COUNTRY. Upper Mary River, May 23. SIR: I read with much pleasure Thomas Ewing's speech about a ploughman's life. But I don't know, or anyway I don't feel quite cer-<*> tain about the meanings of many of the words. i lire away in tho country, and can't find them out, but should like to know if jou could tell me them yourself. The speeoh it in the Queen*, lander for April 7, and the curious word* are: whiles; forpet 5 aoor-dook j forbye { deed | liap, Btap, and loun : otraith« • am a . UnM . clash; aud dreg.- [We share with you in the interest you took in the speech by a " a ploughman on a plough man's Ufe." As to the words which you " don't feel quite certain about," their meanings are as foUow :—" Whiles " means "at times;" " forpit," or "forpet," as it is sometimes speUed, signifies " the fourth part of a peck ;" " soor-dook," is ««sour dip," or " sour milk;" " forbye," is " besides;" "to deed," means "to...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
THE LAND LAWS. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 2 June 1866

THE LAND LAWS. Yours. ABC Ipswich, May 30. SIR: The subject of land laws, new and old, and in what way they can be best arranged for the benefit of this colony, is one of very great importance. Certainly if the government should government fad in bringing forth a perfect measure—one to again send us ahead on the path of prosperity— it v for no lack of advice tendered. As the great want of the colony seems to be the settle ment of a hard-working yeoman class, a class similar to that which has made the great West ern States of America, why not adopt similar laws to those of the Americans ? In that country the Government offer to every man who Ukes to settle, land in any quantity up to 180 acres, at 45., British value, per acre. He has the privi lege of selecting this hind from any unsold or untenanted government land.precisely as though he made a selection in our reserves. He has to enter into no competition for this land ; even should it be unserveyed at the time of his settle ment, ...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
THE LAND LAWS AND THE WORKING CLASSES. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 2 June 1866

THE LAND LAWS AND THE WORKING CLASSES. DARGO. Brisbane, May 26. SIR: In your to-day's Queenslander you reprint an article on the meeting held last Monday in Brisbane, to discuss the present state of our land laws. You satisfaction at express the great success of the meeting, and accord a ! general concurrence on the views of the various j speakers. But there was one thing which in i your opinion the meeting failed to effect—lt failed to elicit a thorough and clear expression ,' of the views of the working classes on this all important question. Among the large number of respectable and intelligent working men of whom the bulk of the meeting was composed, and whose presence was a proof of the deep interest taken by working men on tho land question, there were mon quite capable of fully explaining the views entertained by their class on the various political topics, which at the present time engage public attention. That the meeting was not addressed by a greater number of working men...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Correspondence. FEED FOR FATTENING HORSES. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 2 June 1866

Correspondence. FEED FOR FATTENING HORSES. SIR : As I have seen no answer to a corres-<*> pondent who asked for information concerning the best-feed for bringing a horse into condition, I offer my experience on the subject: For a none doing only an occasional run about town, 70 lbs. of maize per week, with as much bay as he will eat, and an occasional bran mash is quite sufficient. To bring a horse into con dition, I give him an occasional feed of washed sweet potatoes or sorghum, if it can be had. I think the bad condition of many of the Brisbane hones is rather attributable to bad water than insufficient feed. No horse will throe on bad water. " Yours, JOCKEY. Ipswich, May 30.

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
The Novelist. MORLEY ASHTON. CHAPTER XLVIII. THE CORPSE-LIGHT. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 2 June 1866

The Novelist. MORLEY ASHTON. CHAPTER XLVIII. THE CORPSE-LIGHT. BY CAPTAIN JAMES GRANT. AS Morley turned away from the companion, he was confronted by his old friend Morrison, the mate of the defunct Princess. The Scots-<*> man's honest face was radiant with pleasure, and grasping Morley's -hand, he congratulated him warmly on the sudden change tbat a few hours had made in all his plans and prospects. "No use in thinking of Tasmania now, or calculating the chances of finding a ship for the Isle of France, and all that Mr. Ashton, eh ?" said Morrison, laughing. " Thank heaven, no," said Morley, as they descended the break of t]io quarter-deck, and went to windward, near the main-rigging; "bo great as been tbe alteration in all our affairs, that I con scarcely believe I was the poor doomed wretch of a few hours ago. Another night on that wreck would have seen us all dead men, Morrison." Then Morley thought how strange it would have been if the ship, with Ethel on board, h...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
The SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 1866. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 2 June 1866

The SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 1866. THE general principles embodied in the new Land Bill have met with the concur-<*> rence of the Press and of the public so far as the latter can be ascertained by the meetings which have been held on the subject. The gentlemen who are opposing the Bill in the Legislative Assembly have not yet stated the extent to which they are willing to abate their demands, so the question will probably be between the cele brated resolutions on the one hand, and the Government Bill on the other. Between these two there can be no difficulty in deciding. The attempt of the former is to put difficulties in the way of actual settle ment, while the latter is intended to remove obstacles now in existence. It is well known that the restrictions placed on the occupants of Agricultural Reserves, have acted most injuriously. The Bill proposes to reduce them to such an extent as to make them harmless to the farmer, and at the same time sufficient to prevent the land f...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
HISTORY OF A TOWEL A STORY FOR THE OLIVE BRANCHES. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 2 June 1866

HISTORY OF A TOWEL A STORY FOR THE OLIVE BRANCHES. HAVING told little Georgie one day that the sponge with which his face was washed was part of an animal, he naturally asked: "Is the towel an animal too?" " No, Georgie ; the towel is a plant, so is a rose-bush, and com, and grass. There is not much resemblance between them, you see; stiU less docs the towel resemble either; and I will teU you aU the changes the plant passes through before it becomes a towel." The towel is made from a plant called fiax. Far away—in Asia, on the plains of Persia— this plant grows wild. Inmost countries of Europe, especiaUy England, Ireluud, and Belgium, and in many parts of America, large fields of it are cultivated. It bears a pretty delicate blue flower, shaped like a little bell; its' leaves are small, narrow, and pointed; it be longs, in the 6tudy of Botany (for flowers in Botany are all devided into classes and orders) —it belongs to the fifth ela« and fifth order. That is in the centre of the t...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
SUN AND TIDAL DIARY. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 2 June 1866

SUN AND TIDAL DIARY. Xew moon. June 13—Spring tides occur in June, on the 13th or 14th and 2Sth or SSth.—June 23 is the shortest day in the Queensland year. Memoranda tin next Publication.

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
COBB AND CO'S COACHES. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 2 June 1866

COBB AND CO'S COACHES. For Ipswich and Toowoomba, daily at 6.25 am. and at noon. For Dalby, Wednesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays, at, 6.25 Sum. and at noon. The new railway time-table which is to be in force to-morrow when the line is to be opened for regular traffic to Gatton, wiU make con siderable difference in the coaching arrangements, and it is desirable that traveUers should be clearly informed of them. The coach from Brisbane wiU leave daily at half-past 6 in the morning, and at half an hour after noon. The arrival at Ipswich wiU be 10 and a quarter to .4. At half-past 10 and at 4 the trains wiU leave for Gatton, where they wiU arrive at 1 o'clock and at half-past 6in the evening. The Toowoomba coaches, which wiU meet these trains at Gat ton, wiU arrive at Toowoomba at half-past 5 in the evening, and half an hour before midnight. It wiU thus be seen that a passenger may leave Brisbane early in the afternoon, and arrive at Toowoomba by bedtime. From Toowoomba the coaches wiU st...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
SOUTHERN AND WESTERN RAILWAY TIME TABLE. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 2 June 1866

SOUTHERN AND WESTERN RAILWAY TIME TABLE.

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Miscellaneous Reading. THE LATE PRINCE DE CONDE. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 2 June 1866

Miscellaneous Reading. THE LATE PRINCE DE CONDE. CONCERNING the young prince who lately ex-<*> pired in Sydney, the following facts are gathered from papers of the 25th ultimo: — DEATH OF THE PRINCE DE CONDE.-The Prince de Conde died at Petty's Hotel about half-past 10 o'clock last night, at the early age of twenty-two years. He arrived in this colony by the P. and O. Co.'s steamer Bombay, on the 17th of April last, and had been staying at the above hotel. He was travelling for the pur pose of recruiting his health and gaining ex perience. Shortly after bis arrival here he caught cold whilst on a fishing excursion in the harbor, and has been aUing ever since ; bnt no serious consequences had been apprehended until within the last few days when his illness assumed a serious character. In addition to his medical attendant, who travels with him, he has been attended by Dr. Nathan and Er. Alloway. On Tuesday evening he appeared to revive somewhat, and strong hopes were ent...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Commercial Intelligence. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 2 June 1866

Commercial Intelligence. IPSWICH STOCK AND STATION REPORT.- William Hendren reports as follows:—Since my last communication under this heading in April no transactions worthy of particular notice have taken place in this district. The long continued drought—so much and generally complained of previously—has this month given way to con tinued refreshing rains, which have completely altered the appearance of the country from parched brown earth to the refreshing green carpet, everywhere around, causing both buyers and seUers of stock to bestir themselves. By advices received from some of the uorth-western stations, where lambing is now going on, I am informed that, so far as the work has proceeded, the increase is an average of ninety per cent, of fine healthy lambs, and this is saying a very great deal, when the severity of the previous season is taken into consideration. At the same time, I am sorry to say that, from parts of the country far inland and more southerly, alarm ing comp...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
QUEENSLAND EXHIBITION. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 2 June 1866

QUEENSLAND EXHIBITION. THERE have been some further additions to the Exhibition within the last day or two. The cotton exhibits have been increased by three bales from Townsvale, the plantation of Cap- tain Towns, on the Logan River. No. 1 is a bale of lSlbs. Upland cotton, Dunlop roller ginned; No. 2, 501bs. Upland cotton, saw ginned; and No. 3, SOlbs. Sea Island cotton, Dunlop roller ginned. Tho cotton is beautifully clean, and the fibre is strong. Captain Towns deserves special commendation for the way in which the samples have been preparod for ex hibition. A parcel of cotton is shown by Mr. Hugh Stewart, of Moggill. It is ulso a good sample, but the fibre is not so strong as that of the exhibits just mentioned. Mr. Stewart's cotton is grown on a different kind of soil from Captain Towns'. The Rev. Marmaduke Bell exhibits a small sample of picked cotton, also of good quality. Mr. Bushel, of Brisbane, hfts sent to the exhibition an aquarium made by himself. It contains a collecti...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Display Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 2 June 1866

TRY BEN. PALMER A CO.'S 17s. 6d. Saaaaaaaaaaaaaßwl BbbbbbbbtsßwH SBBFBwfwswH .HWsfl Saaaaaf SBwi Vsf wH MADE TO MEASURE. OPPOSITE TOWN TTATT. t QTJBBW STBEBT. GENERAL FURNITURE WAREHOUSE. G THROWER, Spring, Fibre, and Macbinc e made Flock and Hair Mattresses, Iron Bedsteads, and every kind of Colonial Furni ture, Qvbkk-stbxst (opposite Police-office), Bbisbahb.

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Sporting Items. EVENTS TO COME OFF. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 2 June 1866

Sporting Items. EVENTS TO COME OFF. NORTH AUSTRALIAN JOCKEY CLUB.—Annual meeting at Ipswich, on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday June 5, 6 and 7. ' DARLING DOWNS JOCKEY CLUB.—Annual meeting, at Too- woonibo, on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, June 10,20 and 31. Leiciiiiardt Jockey Club.—First Annual meeting, at Springsure, on Thursday and Friday, June 21 and 22. Queensland Jocket Club.—Sixth Annual meeting, on the Gayndah Course, on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, June 2«, 27 and 28. Warwick Jockey Club.—Annual meeting, at Warwick, on Thursday, and Friday, June 28 and it Northern Queensland Jockey Club.—First meeting, on the Bockhampton Bace Course, on Wednesday and Thursday, July 18 and 19.

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Acclimatisation. MORE ABOUT THE SALMON OVA. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 2 June 1866

Acclimatisation. MORE ABOUT THE SALMON OVA. WRITING from Hobart Town, on the 10th instant, the special Correspondent of the Argus says:— I have but little to add to my last letter on this subject. Everything was so weU done from the first, that the course of events follow strictly the line of expectation. By this time Mr. 1 Bamsbottom has commenced his task of sepa rating the dead from the Uve ova, and though bis unremitting care and attention keep him completely occupied, the commissioners and others interested can only fold their hands and wait till the hatching begins. The births are hourly anticipated, and thus the prophecy in last week's Australasian is completely verified. I am sorry to say that the story of the two grilse caught on the east coast is just the myth I supposed it to be. We must be patient ; and when we hear of the return of the salmon to the river which has acted as a stepmother to them, one of the most remarkable experi ments of the age wiU have been successful...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
BREEDING AND MANAGEMENT OF SWINE. (From the Shrewsbury Chronicle.) [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 2 June 1866

BREEDING AND MANAGEMENT OF SWINE. (From the Shrewsbury Chronicle.) FEEDING AND REARING. —As we have to purchase all our pig food, we are to some extent guided by the state of the market as to what we use, but we generally give the suckling sows, as well as the weaned stores, a mixture of ground wheat and barley, with a little bran or pollard added to it, and moistened with cold water, giving any milk as can bo spared to such as we want getting forward as fast as possible. In winter we use warm water for the young ones. With this they are fed morning and evening, and at noon they have a Uttle Indian corn or locust beans to masticate, which, by keeping them on their legs for some length of time, is conducive to activity and a healthy growth. When a litter of pigs are about two days old, their tails will often become sore and red by coming in contact with tbe straw when sucking, while the skin is soft and tender. Indeed, this soreness mostly commences with the first attempt at sucking,...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
ON BREAKING UP NEW LAND FOR CORN CROPS. [Newspaper Article] — The Queenslander — 2 June 1866

ON BREAKING UP NEW LAND FOR CORN CROPS. IN the breaking up of pasture ground for corn crops there is a most important item or two demanding consideration. It is usual to plough up new ground, and without further preparation to sow the seed for a crop. Now, in dry summers, when Uttle rain falls to consolidate the ground, it Ues too hollow—the roots fail to acquire that firm hold upon the soil which they obtain in land which has been under cultivation for a few years. It follows that, when the criti cal period of the formation of the seed or kernel arrives, that process is a failure, more or less. To assist in the decay of the vegetable matter, and to impart firmness to new land destined for corn crops, it should be ploughed (broken np) the previous spring. As no afterwork can be done when earn is once sown, there is no means of remedying the imperfect state of the soil beneath the surface. True, something may be done in the way of rolling in spring towards firming the soiL But this r...

Publication Title: Queenslander, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
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