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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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A Battle Royal. TERRIBLE FIGHT BETWEEN A LION AND A BEAR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

A Battle Royal. TERRIBLE FIGHT BETWEEN A LION AND A BEAR. —♦— Nature never intended that the lion should   ever meet a Polar bear, but civilisation—which   has so much to answer for—is responsible for   this strange meeting. If it were not for civilisa-   tion there would be no circuses, and if it had not   been for an American circus a lion and a bear would never have been caged so close together   and have quarrelled with each other. The Polar   bear had angered the lion in some way—possibly   by his color or his cold and reserved manner.   The keepers were first aware of this trouble   THE FIGHT. when the lion smashed the partition of iron   bars that separated him from the bear. Al- though Bruin had not sought the fight, he met the lion with perfect courage, and the fight began at once. FIRST ROUND. The lion was a magnificent beast, weigh...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
INTERESTING AND CURIOUS. (SPECIAL TO "THE WORLD'S NEWS.") THE TARA BROOCH. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

INTERESTING AND CURIOUS.   (SPECIAL TO "THE WORLD'S NEWS.")   THE TARA BROOCH. The "Tara" brooch, now in the Museum of the Royal Irish Academy, was found near Drogheda, and sold to a metal merchant for a shilling! Five hundred pounds were subsequently offered for it. The gold filagree and plaited work in it is of such delicacy that it has defied all imitation. —O—

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
STAR OF THE SOUTH. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

STAR OF THE SOUTH. The "Estrella do Sul" (Star of the South)   brilliant, in the possession of the Khedive of   Egypt, has a curious story attached to it. It   was found in 1853 at Bargugem, Brazil, by a   negress. In the rough state it weighed 254½   carats. Of the score or two of persons who made   fortunes by the discovery, Casimiro, whose   negress brought it to him in order to obtain her   liberty, was the only one disappointed, having   sold it for £3000. At the Bank of Rio de Janeiro   it was deposited for £30,000. It was cut by Cos-   tar, of Amsterdam, who became its possessor, and   was sold to the Khedive.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE HASTINGS DIAMOND. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

THE HASTINGS DIAMOND.   While the impeachment of Warren Hastings in   1786 was pending, a circumstance occurred which told against him in the popular feeling, and the   suspicions current that Queen Charlotte, who   was generally believed to be avaricious, had sold   her favor for Indian presents. The Nizam of   Deccan, anxious at this time to conciliate the   friendship of England, had sent King George a   valuable diamond of unusual dimensions, and,   ignorant of what was going on in the English   Parliament, had selected Hastings as the channel   through which to deliver it. This peace offering   arrived in England on the 2nd June, after the   second charge had been decided against Hastings   by the Commons. The diamond, with a rich   purse, containing the Nizam's letter, was pre- &am...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ABOUT DIAMONDS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

ABOUT DIAMONDS.   Four thousand years of the world's history   had elapsed before it was ever dreamed that dia-   monds existed, save in one spot, and that of   limited extent. The first diamond of well-ascer-   tained water, brought to light out of India, was,   it is said, accidentally discovered by a miner in   Brazil, in the commencement of the eighteenth   century. Previous to this, the only known dia-   nionds had been found in Borneo and Hindostan.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
EDIBLE THINGS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

EDIBLE THINGS.   In the Sandwich Islands, the edible dog (a favorite dish) is a dainty animal, fed exclusively on vegetables, chiefly taro (a root), in the form of dough, and at the age of two years is considered a dish wherewith to regale Royalty. Plato believed the diamond was the kernel of auriferous matter—its purest and noblest pith, condensed into a transparent mass.   In China, the dog is fattened for the table, and is exposed for sale by the butchers, and in the cook shops. They are eaten by rich and poor alike. The Africans in Zanzibar hold a stew of puppies as a dish fit for a Monarch. In the pastry cook-shops in Russia, the tempt- ing morsel offered to Russian appetites is the piroga, an oily fish-cake. Little benches are ranged round tables, on which the favorite dainty is placed, covered over with an oily canvas, for it must be eaten hot. A large pot of green oil and a stand for salt are in readiness, and as soon as a purchaser demands a piroga...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LIEUTENANT'S LOVE. TOLD IN LETTERS TO A BOXOFFICE GIRL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

  LIEUTENANT'S LOVE.   TOLD IN LETTERS TO A BOX- OFFICE GIRL. In the Court of Session, Edinburgh, recently,   the record was closed in an action by Lily Mary   Whitehead, Lochrin, Edinburgh, against Ivor   John Douglas Philipps, a lieutenant in the Black   Watch, to recover £2000 damages for alleged   breach of promise.     Miss Whitehead (says the London "Express")   is a booking clerk at the Royal Lyceum Theatre,   Edinburgh, and she says that when the defender,   who is 20 years of age, attains his majority on   July 8, 1902, he will succeed to a fortune of sev-   eral thousand pounds, besides certain estates in   Fifeshire.   The defender, who is said to be about five   years younger than the pursuer, was intro-   duced to her in the beginning of Ma...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW THE BRITISH RECOVERED A GUN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

HOW THE BRITISH RECOVERED A   GUN.   A lost Enslish gun is not exactly a novelty, but there is a lost English gun which has just been mounted in the now Admiralty Buildings to which an interesting history attaches. The gun, which is a bronze 12-pounder, was found last year in Pekin by the Germans, and, on it being ascertained that it was an English piece of ordnance, was handed over to Admiral Seymour. On looking up the history of the gun. Admiral Seymour discovered that it was the self-same gun which he himself had lost from a gun boat on the Canton River in the China War of 1857-62. The Chinese had dredged it from the river and taken it to Pekin, where the Germans found it. Admiral Seymour brought the 12-pounder home, and restored it to its original owners—the Ad- miralty.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CAUGHT ONCE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

CAUGHT ONCE.   She: "Do you believe in this theory about   spreading disease by kissing?"   He: "Well, they say there's something in it."   "Did you ever catch anything by kissing a   girl?" "Yes, once; her father saw me at it."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PRESIDENT AND PEOPLE. ROOSEVELT TOO AUTOCRATIC FOR THE UNITED STATES. The Washington correspondent of the "Morning Leader" (London) writes to that journal on December 27 as follows:— [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

PRESIDENT AND PEOPLE. ROOSEVELT TOO AUTOCRATIC FOR THE UNITED STATES. The Washington correspondent of the "Morn- ing: Leader" (London) writes to that journal on December 27 as follows:— The signs of discontent with Roosevelt are growing. In the Republican newspapers one may find an occasional reference to the Pre- sident's stubbornness. One newspaper has likened him to the hot- headed William of Germany, and warned him that that sort of thing will not go in this coun- try. Nor will it. Roosevelt made a bad, a very bad, mistake when he called General Miles to account in the White House, the other day, be- fore a whole roomful of people, for some com- ment that Miles had made upon the Schley case. The President scolded the General com- manding the army as a father might scold his 10-year-old son—if he were an unwise and hot- headed father. AN UNCALLED-FOR REBUKE. All through the country there is rolling a feel- ing that this rebuke was uncalled-for, and that it was undignified, if not...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE LUCK OF A HORSESHOE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

THE LUCK OF A HORSESHOE. —♦— Horseshoes are supposed to be lucky, though the instance narrated by "The Road," in the following story must surely be the exception that proves the rule: "A man picked up a horseshoe in the road, and in accordance with the recognised custom, threw it over his left shoulder. So far so good, but the missile hit another man in the eye, blinding him for life, the man fell through a plate-glass window valued at £20, a piece of the glass struck a child, and so frightened it that it fell under the wheels of a passing 'bus, and was run over; the screams of the child made the horses in the 'bus bolt, and the vehicle was overturned, all of its 26 occupants being more or less hurt. Then the lucky man who picked up the horseshoe went and filed his petition, in view of the claim for consequential damages that he anticipates.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE BIGGEST CALF. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

THE BIGGEST CALF. Extinguished.—"Call these yer prize cattle? Them ain't nothin' to what our folks can do. My father reared the biggest calf of any man in our parts." Sarcastic Bystander: "I don't doubt it—and the noisiest.'"

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A DINNER A LA CHINESE. (SPECIAL TO "THE WORLD'S NEWS.") [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

A DINNER A LA CHINESE. (SPECIAL TO "THE WORLD'S NEWS.") Course No. 1.—Tea, hung-yos (burnt almonds), tonkins (dried ginger), sung-wos (preserved orange). „ 2.—Won-fo (a dish not mentioned in the cookery book). „ 3.—Ton-song. „ 4.—Tap-fau. „ 5.—Ko-yo (a conglomerate of fish, flesh, and fowl). „ 6.—Suei-chon (a species of fish ball). „ Beche^le-mer (a dried kind of sea slug, resembling India rubber, worth one dollar per pound). „ Moisum (have some?) „ Su-yum (small balls, contents unknown). „ 10.—Hoisuigo (a kind of dried oyster). ,, 11.—Songhai (China lobster). „ 12.—Chung-so (small ducks in oil). „ 13.—Tong-chou (mushrooms worth three dollars per pound). „ 14.—Sum-yoi (birds' nests, worth 60 dollars per pound). And some 10 or 12 more courses, consisting of stewed acorns, chestnuts, sausages, dried ducks, stuffed oysters, shrimps, periwinkles, and end- ing with tea.'

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A BISHOP AS EDITOR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

A BISHOP AS EDITOR.   The Bishop of Tarentaise has turned journalist, and is now editing the "Independent Savoyard," a Republican journal, published in Paris. There is nothing biassed about the bishop, for although the journal will uphold the rights of the army and religion as of justice and property, the new editor is all for progress. In what might be called his inducting article, he announces his intention of propagating Social- ism in the true sense of the word, and remaining loyal alike to the Pope and the Republic. People were wondering when the last mail left   whether the bishop's action would recommend it-   self to the Archbishop of Paris, who recently, in   view of the coming elections, gave a strong in-   junction to all his clergy to hold aloof from poli-   tical struggles.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
'BUS CONDUCTOR AND PASSENGER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

'BUS CONDUCTOR AND PASSENGER. Conductor: " 'Olloway Road!" Passenger: "You've dropped something, havn't you?" Con- ductor: "Never mind, sir, we shall pick it up at the Hangel."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Smart Retort. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

A Smart Retort. Benevolent Lady: "Is it true you've often to go without a meal?" Tramp: "It is ma'am. The breakfast you have given me now should have been had last July."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NEW FORM OF BARREL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

NEW FORM OF BARREL. A simple method of permitting a farmer to   inspect the contents of his fruit barrels is an   invention which is illustrated in the accompany-   lag engraving. The invention consists in pro-   viding one or more of the staves of a barrel with   longitudinally-split tongue, the very end of   which is held securely in place by the hoop, but   which can be released and opened to permit an   examination of the contents by displacing the   hoop.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A NOVEL NUTCRACKER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

A NOVEL NUTCRACKER.     Most of us run riot among the nuts which   other hands have gathered for us, and, this   being so, the latest invention in the shape of a nutcracker, which is illustrated, will be of particular interest to our readers. To crack a nut with the ordinary instrument so that only the shell will be broken is not easy; but even a child can perform this feat   with the nutcracker which is shown in the   picture, and which has just been invented.   It consists of two flat metal plates, and of a metal ring, within which the two plates are fastened at a short distance from each other.   One of the plates is attached to a screw, which   can be turned by moving the handle.   Thus, when a walnut, almond, or any other   nut is to be cracked, all that is necessary is to   place it between the two plates and turn the &...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHERE SALT HAS TO BE SMUGGLED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

WHERE SALT HAS TO BE SMUGGLED. In Venezuela there is a very heavy duty on common salt, while "fruit salt," of which a large amount is consumed, is introduced free. The Customs authorities, according to the "Chemist and Druggist," not long ago were astonished to find that an immense amount of fruit salt was imported. The sudden increase in the importation of this article at last excited the suspicion of the officials, and on examination it was found that the fruit salt was really the common table ar- ticle, done up in bottles to resemble a well-known proprietary article.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WATER BAG HOOD FOR HEADACHES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

WATER BAG HOOD FOR HEADACHES. A water bag for the head is one of the latest substitutes for tbe old-fashioned flannel petti- coat receipt. The bag is shaped like a hood, is tied under tbe chin of the wearer, and has an opening at the top, into which water, hot or cold, is poured. If you happen to have a head- ache you will want ice water, but something else may be the trouble, and hot water will NEW-FASHIONED COMFORT.   serve the purpose better. It is an easy way   of applying hot or cold compresses to the bead,   and, the bag being divided into compartments,   only one or two of them may be filled, if pre-   ferred. The weight of the bag should not be   great.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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