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Elephind.com contains 66,464 items from Day Book, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

THE DAY 500 SO. PEORIA ST. s398 BOOK TEL. MONROE 353 Vol. 1, No. 86 Chicago, Friday, Jan. 5, 1912 One Cent LA FOLLETTE DENOUNCES USE OF SHERMAN LAW AGAINST THE UNIONS Says Courts Wrongly Apply the Law to Unions jand Fail to Use It Against "Big Interests." Is Suffering With Cold. PeoriaIlL, Jan. 5. Robert M. La Follette, the Progressive Republican leader, in a speech before an audience of Spring Val1 ley miners, yesterday defined his position on "The Courts and Labor Combinations." He denounced in unmeasured terms the miraculous manner in which the courts have discovered that the Sherman antitrust law applies to the labor organiations to which it was never intended to apply, and does not apply to the "Big Business" to which it was intended to apply. La Follette was so ill he hardly was able to keep his feet, and his throat so rough that every word was an effort. He is suffering from a complication of cold and Charles R. Crane's oyster soup. While La Follette was Crane's guest in Chic...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

Sherman law, La Follette'said in part: "There is one class of so-called restraint of trade that was not intended, or at least not understood, to come under the Sherman law. That is organized labor. "Yet it is a curious fact that while the courts have carefully protected investors in trusts against loss ofvalues, the only instance where the extreme penalty of threefold damages has been imposed is in the case of a labor organization. "The court has gone to the extent of seizing upon the savings of a labor organization and ordering that these little investments should be paid over, as far as they went, toward giving the employers three tames the damages that the union had caused them. "It is strange that when the court goes to the limit in imposing penalties on combinations of capital, all the capitalist owners get away with the full value of their property even although the court explicitly states that these capitalist owners committed crimes in getting that property; and when the cou...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

on the initiative, referendum and recall. "If your representative represents a jackpot rather than you," he told Browne's constituents, "you need the initiative, referendum and recall in order to deal with him." La Follette left Peoria this morning after eating his first -o- meal in 36 hours. He said that he felt mighty weak, but that he was going through with his schedule of speeches. He made seven speeches today on the interur'ban trip of 140 miles to East St. Louis. The Illinois campaign will close tomorrow in Danville, home town of "Uncle Joe" Cannon. o- BLIZZARD AND COLD CAUSE INTENSE SUFFERING THROUGHOUT THE COUNTRY By a Reporter. When you woke up this morning in your warm room, and, over your steaming coffee, read in the paper that the thermometer had been hovering around 10-below-zero mark, the coldest in ten years, didn't a sort of thrill that at last you were present when so'mething unusual happened, steal over you. You had often read of other places where a cold record wa...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

sonal avenger, and my zest at being present when the mercury broke the record was dulled. The United Charities, the county agent's office and other distributing points of fuel and food were unable to handle the number of applicants for relief. Settlement houses, women's clubs and private philanthropies were beseiged and overwhelmed. The scenes at the municipal lodging house on Union street were pitiful. Fifty persons were given cots and blankets on the third floor. They were "fortunate" ones. Another fifty were packed away beneath the cots. Fifty more huddled between them three times the usual capacity of the quarters. And where there were no cots the men lay without covering or pillows. The second floor was a reproduction of the third. The first floor, usually a reception room, was covered solidly with a layer of sleeping humanit', their only covering their clothes, and their rolled-up coats for pillows. In the basement ISO more tried to sleep. Seven hundred and fifty homeless men ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

poor crowd into one room simIy to save heat." In all 240 families were given coal and food at the county agent's office yesterday, enough food to last for few days, and half a ton of coal. Since the beginning of the new year 1,000 tons of coal have been distributed. Here also the cause of so many applicants is declared to be scarcity of work, and, too, it is said that the full force of the cold has not yet made its mark on the poor. "We have had more applications for help .than any time in five years," said Joseph Meyer, county agent. "It looks bad I don't know how some of these people are going to get through the winter." The Jewish Aid Society reported similar conditions. It sent out sixty orders of coal. The Swedish National association took care of fifty families. Miss Mary McDowell, head of the University of Chicago settlement in the "Back o' the Yards" district, said conditions seemed worse than usual. "Of course," she added, "most of the suffering will not come until the thou...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

South Side "L" delayed 10,000 workers. Fierce wind at Clark and Randolph made corner danger spot for women and children. Six policemen on guard. Two horse wagon piled with empty boxes blown over, and boxes tossed by gale. Temperature in many street cars on various lines registered under 30 degrees. Four men overcome by cold given medical attention, at Desplaines street station. John Jackson, 80, reported to the police to have died of exposure last night. Found alone in cellar into which he had crawled to escape the cold. H. Hazearn, 55, 840 E. 55th street, struck and killed by street car. Walked across track with high ulster collar about his face, and failed to see or hear car. South Chicago suburban branch of Illinois Central out of commission an hour this morning. Stations along line crowded with shivering patrons. Stanley Lonkowski, laborer, 3658 George street, both hands frozen and toes nipped. Picked up near W. Chicago ave. police station. Treated by ambulance surgeon and taken...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

ter registered 28 degrees below zero at 7 o'clock, and 15-mile wind blowing. Charitable organizations swamped with calls for aid, and unable to cope with situation. Theodore Selzer, 60, died in Milwaukee, his hands and feet frozen. Temperature of 14 below. Municipal lodging houses crowded. Score of cold and sufferers in hospitals. La Crosse, Wis., experienced its coldest day in years, with a temperature of 22 degrees below zero. Thermometer at Duluth, Minn, this morning showed 33 to 35 degrees below zero. Calhoun county, 111., isolated by cold weather. The county .has no railroads, and the Mississippi and Illinois are bank-full with ice, preventing movement of ferry boats. THE OTHER MA &F Asker:'"How do you excuse those mother-in-law jokes of yours to your wife?" Funniman : ''I tell her they refer to her mother-in-law, and she says they are not half bad enough." o o "PEOPLE BEFORE JUDGES" ROOSEVELT New oYrk, Jan. 5. A referendum, whereby the people may place a law upon t...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

THE WAiiK WAbON Ten little penitents, feeling mighty fine, .One said: "How slow it is!" then there were nine. Nine little penitents, bravely spurning bait, One got a stomach-ache then there were eight. Eight little penitents, with eyes turned to heaven; One glimpsed a beer sign then there were seven. Seven little penitents, nobly saying "nix!" One got tongue-tied then there were six. Six little penitents, struggling not to dive,' One smelled a free lunch then there were five. Five little penitents, burning to the core, .One grabbed a lamp post then there were four. Four little penitents, sipping soothing tea, .One saw a purple snake then there were three. Three little penitents, struggling to be true, .One found a corkscrew then there were two. Two little penitents, yea'rning for a bun, Pne wasn't looking then there was one. One" little penitent, lone and sick at heart, Then an awful thud was heard empty was the cart. HE SUSPECTED McNAMARAS OF DYNAMITING This is Charles A. Bookwalte...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

"SENATOR BOB" AND "T. R." WORK FOR PROGRESSIVE VICTORY IN CHICAGO CONVENTION By Gilson Gardner. Washington, Jan. 5. LaFoll-. ette and 'Roosevelt arc workinsr in harmony to insure a progressive control of the next Republican national convention. LaFollette is more encouraged than ever before to carry through his canvass to the last ' ballot in Chicago. There is no clash between La Follette and the Roosevelt movements. LaFollette is a candidate. Roosevelt is not a candidate. Both are opposed to Taft. Both are for the progressive program. Roosevelt is LaFollette's chief support. He believes LaFollette is the best man to make the progressive fight. The fight must be made aggressively and in the open. Roosevelt is not in a position to make the fight himself. He does not feel that he can take an aggressive part in sending into private life the man he put into the presidential office. i But Roosevelt will .not help Taft to another term. Taft repudiated all the policies to which he was pled...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

mmmmmmmmm charge on the administration ramparts some of these think they see a chance to transfer the banner to the hands of the veteran general and transform what has already become a hopeful fight into a brilliant and easy victory. But after all the facts arc only these: LaFollette is the progressive candidate. Roosevelt is avowedly not a candidate. Roosevelt and LaFollette are working in entire accord. The LaFollette-Roosevelt alliance is against the nomination of Taft. The LaFollette-Roosevelt alliance aims to write the platform of the next republican convention. The nomination will go to that progressive who is most likely to lead the cause to victory. o o EVOLUTION Out of the dusk a shadow, Then, a spark? Out of the cloud a silence, Then a lark; Out of the heart a rapture, Then a pain; Out of the dead, cold ashes. Life again. Father Tabb. Reno's to have a "Merry Grass Widow" newspaper. Announcement says "it will contain nothinglhat people of culture shouldn't read." Subscripti...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

LAJOIE NEVER HURRIES, WAGNER ALWAYS DOES BOTH GREAT STARS By Billy Evans. In the National and American league are any number of players who are classed as stars. Each has his following' who regard him as the "greatest ever." These stars play various position and have displayed characteristics which have endeared them to fandom. There are a number of big league players who lack style, yet they are just as valuable as the players with the finesse. Seldom do such players become big favorites, because they fail to do thing in a way that causes comment. I have often heard patrons of the game say: "Well, Detroit 'is here today, let us go out and see Cobb;'' or "The Highlanders are here, let's see Chase cut up :" or "The Pirates are with us, let's sec what Wagner does;" or "Cleve- ) land plays today. 1 can't miss Larry;" or "Matty is going to pitch, it will be some game." There arc any number of others who have their following. I have enumerated a few of the most prominent. There is someth...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

wmmmmmmmmmmmm r --"- Ty Cobb combines' some of the characteristics of all the stars. He has dash galore, is as graceful as a gazelle.iias the speed of oChase and the brain of Mathew son, the dash of Wagner and the grace of Lajoie.--o SHE JUMPED FROM MOVING PICTURE SHOW TO STAR PART IN NEW PLAY Miss Ina Claire. New York, Jan. 5. Miss Ina Claire, plaring the title role in "The Quaker Girl," jumped from obscurity to fame in a single night. t She is only 18. For a number of years she had been singing in a moving picture house in Washington, eight performances a day for $20 a week. Henry B. Harris found difficulty in getting someone to interpret the part of the demure little Quakeress in his new play. He tried out nearly a score of actresses. A friend who had passed through Washington and seen and heard Miss Claire, suggested she be given a trial. "She hasn't any dramatic training, but she'll make good," he told Harris. And she has ''made good" so well and captivated her audiences by her...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

PORTION OF LAFOLLETTE'S CHICAGO SPEECH NEWSPAPERS WITHHELD On Wednesday night, January 3, Orchestra Hall was crowded with about 3,000 people eager co hear Senator LaFollette flay the interests that practically ru'e the country to suit themselves, without a thought or a care of how it will effect the people. He showed how the business of the nation was divided into four branches. There was the transportation business, meaning the steam roads; there was the business conduced under franchises, like the gas, electric light and street railway facilities in our cities ; there was the business listed on the stock market in Wall street as "industrials," like the United States Steel Cornoration and the big manufacturing concerns; and the financial business run by the banks, trust companies and insurance companies. He took up the railroad and showed that there are today six systems in the United States, and that these six systems are controlled by eight men. La Follette told how he had studie...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

"vi- put into practice in Chicago, wouldn't it put a crimp in the big circulation talk of the newspapers? For if they were on lv read by those they serve, grabbing off street corners, hiring sluggers and maintaining a small delivery army would not he necessary, for one boy could undoubtedly carry the route without any trouble. o o REAL SPORT LEADERS George Bonhag. Distance Champion. Three Miles; 14 minutes, 32 seconds DR. PARKHURST AND THE ORIENTAL WIGGLE New York, Jan. 5 Dr. Charles H. Parkhurst, the gentleman who derives part of his income by giving advice to Teaders of the Hearst newspapers, attended lidward Russell's "Oriental Thursday Afternoon," yesterday. The "at home" in the perfume laden studio was dedicated to monkeys and oriental dancing and a deep and psychological discussion as to whether monkeys resemble men or men monkeys, and how long it will be before thev are exactly alike. Two highly educated monkeys took part in the debate and there was some er dancing. Mrs. Jack...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

JOHNSON TO HAVE WHAT HE WANTS FROM JUDGE If the attitude of Municipal Judge Rooney of the. 35th street court is any criterion, Jack Johnson, heavyweight champion, need have no further fear of running foul of the speed laws or "'doing a bit in stir," to be real English, for any further offenses. According to the judge's own statement to Johnson, he can . .v"; .: Jack Johnson. have anything he wants when he appears in his court, and naturally the "smoke" won't want a Bridewell sentence. Johnson appeared yesterday in behalf of his brother Charles, who was arrested on a charge of perjury. When the case was called the "cinder" stepped before Judge Rooney and said : "Your honor, as my brother's lawyer has not appeared, I would like to have a continuance in the matter." Jack's past experiences have familiarized him with court procedure. "Are you Jack Johnsorf, the champion?" queried Judge Rooney. "Yes, sir." Judge Rooney leaned over the bench and grasped the. mitt that put a period to Jeff...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

mmmmmmmmmm h i I! t LET HER SPROUT! Mayor Shank's potato 1 idea has sprouted. Two thousand citizens of Indianapolis have organized a company, with shares at $5 each, to do things to the rapacious middleman and cold storage extortionist. The consumers have arisen against extortion and will deal directly with the producers. Good idea? Of course it is, and well worth watching. Thirty-five years ago the other victims of the middleman, the producers, rebelled. We had co-operative grange stores in many cities. The scheme successfully carried out, would todav be -a grand thing. But it was dependent upon the consumers standing together. They didn't, save in spots. Now the consumers are trying it on. Will they stand together? That's the whole question. There is no extortion or abuse on the entire list that cannot be corrected if the masses will pull together. How can there be private cinch or class cinch, if the people government are loyal to organized competition with the cinch-holders? Abn...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

wacsmmmmmmmmm -S AKDLPH IS SOME LITTLE PRINCE NOT V d ITS6GMSW V3 S)Nce J VI L WAVE, seen Yoo, i on, w prince. . ; ' I I Ort, MY 'fc" !i i i

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

5?!5S!5555SPPPPPPiPWi EAST HONORS PAID TO "FIGHTING BOB" BY ADMIRALS AND BLUEJACKETS; MEN OF TWO WARS AND BOYS Washington, Jan. 5. Uncle Sam paid last honors to "Fighting Bob" Evans this afternoon, with all the impressive ceremonial of the largest military funeral here in years. More than a thousand men, representing both branches of the military service, formed the funeral escort, and were lined up at "piesent arms" when the melancholy notes of "taps" were sounded at the grave edge in Arlington cemetery. Immediately thereafter, a salute of thirteen guns sounded a last farewell. All Souls Unitarian church was not large enough to accommodate those who assembled for the last religious rites over the dead admiral's body at 2 :30 o'clock. In the congregation were President Taft, Admiral George Dewey, General Nelson A. Miles, practically every member pi the cabinet, and the representatives of all foreign nations accredited to the United States. High navy officers who served with the dead...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm VEILED BEAUTY OF BAGDAD CAUSES MUCH VIOLENT! HEARTTHROBBING mi Rita Jolivet as Marsineh iji'Kismet." New York, Jan. 5. The veil that shrouds the dead and buried centuries lifts, the present fades and one lives in the days of the Arabian Nights as one watches "Kismet," a new play, unheralded, that has gripped New York. Edward Knoblauch, who wrote if tried for three years to get it produced here. Then London took it and New York was gla3 to. The staging of the play is perhaps as magnificent. Otis Skin- i

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 5 January 1912

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm -f &-& fter appears in the stellar role, Hajj. The scene of the phy is in Bagdad. r Hajj's daughter, Marsineh, is the center of the love interest. which is orientally violent, of course. The part is well played bv Rita To hvet. an J .niriisli actress. .Kg I -RAILROAD DEPARTMENT OF A. F. OF L. MEETS HERE The railroad department of the 'American Federation of Labor is in session at the Kaiserhof Hotel. President J. W. Kline of the 'Blacksmiths' International, one of the members of the department, said that the meetings would be behind closed doors, and the result of the deliberations would not be made public. He said this was done in order to prevent the Railroad managers from obtaining information as to what the unions intended to do. Nevertheless, there is a strong impression in labor circles that the body will take up the proposition of a general western strike, which has" been agitated for some time, and will definitely decide whethe...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
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