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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

58 The Indian Advocate. penny lying on the sill, you can have it, if you'll clear out and let me work." "Oh thanks, thanks, you dear old auntie. Goodbye, I won't bother you," and the girl skipped joyfully to the door, with her treasures. But on the threshold she started back, with a little cry of surprise. There stood the soldier whom she had seen asleep m, x on her way from school. jj? Taking off his tattered cap he advanced into the room and .... . . ., i t i ii ; ft said, in a low voice: "Madam, it you would Kinaiy give me some bread, you would have my everlasting gratitude, for I am almost starving." With one glance of dislike the lady addressed replied: "I've nothing for beggars. These soldiers that pester us are half of them scamps. Be off now, for you won't get anything here." "Yes, madam, I am going, but first let me say that I never begged before. I am no beggar," and again touching his cap with a courteous gesture, he walked proudly away. The little girl, with great tears ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

The Indian Advocate. 59 be something like an angel." Then she looked at the bright penny in ber hand, and thought longingly of what it would buy. But her pity conquered and with the whisper, "the angels came and ministered to Him," she laid it down, and ran swiftly away, as if afraid of relenting. She did not see the soldier as he looked after her with grateful eyes, nor hear him say, in a voice suggestive of tears, "God bless your loving little heart, He only knows from what you saved me. At one of the meetings of the Grand Army of the Repub lic, about twenty years after the Civil war, an old soldier was addressing a large number of people. He had a tall com manding figure, but his left coat sleeve hung empty, telling a silent, but eloquent tale. In recounting his experiences he said: "Of all the mem ories of that time, one incident stands boldly forth, shinning in its brightness against the background of bloodshed and suffering. In the latter part of April, twenty years ago, I was...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

6o Tub Indian Advocate. saved me. Her sweet sympathy healed the wound that had been made in my heart, and I went away a new man. "I have that little penny yet, and every night and morn ing I pray that God may bless my little angel." J&p l wfl The Longest Day. At Stockholm, Sweden, the longest day is eighteen and one-half hours in length. At Spitzbergen the longest day is three and one-half months. At London, England, and Bremen, Prussia, the longest day has sixteen and one-half hours. At Hamburg, in Germany, and Dantzig, in Prussia, the longest day has seventeen hours. At Wardbury, Norway, the longest day lasts from May 21 to July 22, without interruption. At St. Petersburg, Russia, and Tobolsk, Siebria, the longest day is nineteen hours, and the shortest five hours. At Tornea, Finland, June 21 brings a day nearly twenty two hours long, and Christmas one less than three hours long. At New York the longest day is about fifteen hours, and at Montreal, Canada, it is sixteen. But th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

Tun Indian Advocatk. 61 r 4 Thp firpafpcf Hif nf f.nH v i arsr i The Greatest Gift of God. :..... ! OTH1NG is so common nowadays as the attacks upon the greatest gift of God to mankind, holy Faith. Misrepresented, maligned, distorted are the teachings of the Church, and many Catholics weakened in faith through a want of prayer, through neglect of the holy sacraments, are mis led by these false doctines and fall away from the Church. Anybody acquainted with the history of the Catholic Church knows what she has done in the past centuries for civilization in every form and shape. Slavery has been abolished, family life lifted up to its present standard, barbarous nations at war with each other have heard the true Gospel of love and were turned in to industrious, useful citizens. And we, too, share in the grand results of the missionary achievements of the Catholic Church. But do we appreciate them, as we should? And what are all these temporal benefits compared to the spirit ual blessi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

w 62 Tm: Indian Advocatk. we were carefuly instructed by our teachers and priests in the mysteries of our holy religion. How often did not the Holy Church strengthen us with the holy Bread of life against the dangers and temptations to which we are all subject? Did she not as a wise and loving mother advise us in our doubts, guide us in our dangers, sooth and comfort us in our sorrows? And in the last hours of life, when all others might forsake us, when we are about to enter into dark eternity, in this all deciding moment, it is she who sends her priests to our bed side, assures us the forgiveness of our sins, by the holy sacra ments of the dying, takes away the terrors of death, lets us die in peace! And even after death, does she not remember you in her prayers, in the holy sacrifice of Mass and through the numberless indulgences come to your rescue? All this you, my Catholic friends, enjoy, whereas millions of heathens are deprived of these blessings. How do you appreciate the g...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

The Indian Advocate. 63 then, and then alone can we be called the true children of Godl Show your appreciation by living according to your faith. We must keep the holy vows made at our baptism, fleeing from pride, covetousness, and the gratification of our sensu ality. We must shun the works of Satan, keeping holy the temple of the Holy Ghost, our body, lest we call down upon us the anger of the Almighty. We must live up to the duties of our respective state of life, thus showing ourselves as worthy children of the holy Church. Read these words very carefully, and then ask yourself: How do they tally with your cursing, your neglect of holy Mass, your carelessness in the reception of the holy sacraments? Do you really live up to yoar faith? And if you renounce Satan in holy baptism, why do you do his works? And all his pomps? It seems you have forgotten this part, otherwise you could not be so foolish as to seek the amusements and pleasures of the world so eagerly in preference to yo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

m 64 Tiik Indian Advocatk. I & Local Paragraphs Father Justin left after the Retreat for Abbeville, La., to help good Father La Florest in his populace Missions. As we go to press our students are preparing their first term's exam ination in our next issue we will give the result. Asher, with commendable onterprise, has raised $10,000 for a can ning factory. The plant will be ready to handle next fall's vegetable crop. Almost all our pupils went home to spend Christmas with their pa rents. Enough were left, however, to warrant the presence of good old Santa in our midst. We learn from St. Vincent's Journal that two of our young Fathers are staying at the Abbey, one taking a course of music and the other per fecting his oratorical talents. We are glad to learn that Rev, Isadore, 0. S. B. has quite recovered from his illness. The Rev. gentlemen is now in the Rochester diocese in the interest of the Indian schools. The Asher-Oklahoma Central Railroad company, chartered to build 400...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

Vol. XV. The Indian Advocate MARCH, 1903. When I Have Time. WHEN I have time I'll pause and turn aside; I'll take the narrow way: forsake the wide; I'll shun the thoroughfare where traffic grinds Forever and anon; Where lucre's sheen the soul and mankind blinds, Hut blinds and shoves him on; And guides his fingers to his neighbor's purse, And sinks him to perdition's depths or worse. T'U quit these scenes someday When I have time. When I have time, at home I'll spend it more; I'll kiss the face that greets me at the door; And by mv tired wife I'll take my place, Her burden will I share. I'll smooth her way; I'll banish from her face The shad'wy clouds of care. I'll hie me to .he byways; the oppressed I'll aid; I'll comfort the distressed. These things I'll do, and more When I have time. When I have time I'll make my peace with God; I'll tread the path that other saints have trod; I'll take mv dusty Bible from its shelf, And read it through and through; I'll learn to love my neighbor...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

66 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. S! The Indian Territory's Minerals. Game. Fish, Etc. ZS3 AXTV uonrc i-kt-dTTij-kno t- t-Via rrmnfnl r tnf HlVG pr tribes west of the Mississippi, the Indian Terri tory was sparsely peopled by Mexicans, who led a roving life; leaving traces here and there in the shape of excavations, where they had, no doubt, sought to unearth silver and other precious met als. These excavations, which are very numer ous, especially in some districts of the Cherokee Nation, vary in depth from five to thirty-five feet, and six or eight of these may sometimes be found within a square mile. The character of the specimens of ore dis covered in the neighborhood of these places strongly indicates silver, and what might prove by development to be in paying quantities. From the amount of labor which must have been gone through by the Mexicans in this country, it is but reas onable to conclude that at some point or other they had made significant discoveries. Until recently, the sentim...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

INDIAN TERRITORY'S MINERAL, GAME, ETC. 67 a mineral country; because, independent of large bodies of iron, and good indications of lead and silver, it contains the richest coalfields in the Southwest. The royalty accruing to the Nation from this source alone is more than sufficient to sustain the government, if due economy were used. Three forrths of the great tract lying between the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railroad and the Arkansas line is unfitted for cultiva tion, being intersected by lofty mountain ranges, with a roll ing country between; upheavels are to be met with every where, and the timber is chiefly evergreen. Little prospect ing has been attempted in the mountains by genuine experts, but it is reasonable to expect the presence of lead in large quantities, with the accompanying percentage of silver. In 1887 and 1888 a gold and silver mining company was organized at Atoka, on the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railroad; shafts were sunk withing one mile of the depot, and...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

68 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. dise. Even at the present time certain eastern portions of the Choctaw Nation may be regarded as second only to the Rocky mountains in affording sport to the lover of gun and rod. The mountain ranges lying between the Missouri, Kansas & lexas railroad and the Arkansas State line, being almost uninhabited, and in places wholly impassable, form a secure retreat for wild animals, such as bear, panther, cougar, catamount and deer. Bear are very plentiful, especially in the vicinity of the Kiamitia river, in Wade county: eight bears were killed by one man during the summer and fall of 1891, in the Jacks' fork mountains, while several other hunters killed from two to four each during the same months, besides capturing some six or eight 1 ubs. Bear hunting in these mountains is at its best when the huckleberry (or whortleberry) is ripening on the foot-hills and grassy slopes. Where the fruit is most plentiful, there bruin is certain to be found. The female weans...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

INDIAN TERRITORY'S MINERAL, GAME, ETC. 69 and one-stream known by the name of Morris creek, by some, and.by others as Little Cedar contains a fish that 're sembles both the grayling and mountain trout, and which af fords excellent sport. The creek referred to Heads about ten miles east of Tuskahoma and flows southeast into Little river. Bass are to be found in its waters ranging from one-half pound to six pounds, and will rise at the proper fly eagerly from April until the middle of July. The species of trout re ferred to seldom exceeds two pounds, but is a gamey fish. It will strike at spoon or fly in the rapids, but in the deeper pools he is more easily captivated by the red angle-worm, which he takes with great avidity, especially after a freshet. Having mentioned fly fishing, it may gratify some read ers to learn the quality or make-up of the artifice so successful in the capture of bass in this country, the same fly being ef fective in all the mountain streams. To dress the "Ra...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

70 THK INDIAN ADVOCATE. addicted to this celebration. The men, women and children gather together in great numbers on a given day, each family contributing a share of "devil's shoestring," a ground vine, which, root and stem, is mashed between rocks, and thrown into a deep pool at the head of a long shallow. In a few hours the poison begins to do its work, and the intoxicated fish rise to the surface to breathe, and float downwards with the current to the shallows, where they are met by a line of bowmen, who salute them with showers of arrows. The sport creates great excitement, and is watched with intesest by the spectators on both bank1; of the river, frequently to the number of two or three hundred persons. The boys are not the least active f the bowmen. Occasionally a little fellow of ten or twelve will encountei an immense buffalo or catfish, from twenty-five to forty pounds in weight, and having trans fixed it with his arrow, grasps the missile, and finds himself i struggling ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 71 The Indian in the Nineteenth Century. (Continued from the January number. ) The fighting did not cease, for all the promises or threats of the government. But always, it is credibly declared, the first cause of an Indian outbreak was a wrong inflicted upon some tribe. And always, in the latter days as in the earlier period, it has meant one more effort on the part of the old warriors to regain the power they saw slipping away so fast. Both these causes entered into the awful Sioux war in Min nesota in 1862. Suffering from piled-up wrongs, smarting nnder the loss of power, and conscious that the Civil war was their opportunity, a party of one hundred and fifty Sioux began the most horrid massacre known for fifty years; the be ginning of a struggle which lasted for more than a year, and which was remarkable for the steadfast fidelity of the Chris tian Indians, to whose help and succor whole bodies of white men owed their lives. Four years later, in 1866, the di...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

72 THE INDIAN IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. they met in a long and desperate struggle were Crazy Horse and Spotted Tail, notable warriors both. At the battle of the Big Horn, by some misunderstanding or mismanagement, General Custer was left with only five companies to meet nearly three thousand savage Sioux. He fought desperately until the last, but he was killed and his command was so ut terly destroyed that not a single man was left alive. The at tempt to remove the Modocs from California to Oregon in 1872 was the signal for a new war; and a year or two after wards similar results followed when it was attempted to push the Nez Perces from the homes ihey sought in Oregon to a new reservation in Idaho. This tribe, under its famous leader, Chief Joseph, was hard to conquer. The military org anization, the civilized method of warfare, and the courage and skill of the tribe were publicly complimented by Gener als Sherman, 'Howard and Gibbons, who declared Chief Jo seph to be one of the g...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 73 7 treatment of the Cheyenne tribe by the government, and their vain endurance of wrongs, interspersed with savage out breaks, when human nature could endure no longer. It in cludes the account of a massacre of helpless Indian women and children under a flag of truce; a war begun over ponies stolen from the Indians, and sold in the open market by the whites in a land where the horse thief counts with the mur derer; another incited by a rage against a trader who paid one dollar bills for ten dollar bills; and tells of whole tractsof land seized without compensation by the United States itself. The Northern Cheyennes had been taken by force to the Indian Territory, and in its severe heat, with scant and poor rations, a pestilence came upon them. Two thousand were sick at once, and many died because there was not medicine enough. At last three hundred braves, old men and young, with their women and children, broke away and, making a raid through Western Kansas, s...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

74 THE INDIAN IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. of the reservations, but with little more certainty of peace than before. Again and again starvation was followed by fighting, nameless outrages upon the Indian by cruel outrages upon the white man. Whether Apaches under Geionimo in New Mexico, or Sioux in Dakota, it was the old story over again. Thus, with constant danger menacing the white set tler from the infuriated savage Indian, and constant outrage upon the red man by rapacious and cruel whites, the govern ment found a new policy necessary. This policy was inaugu rated by a strange and unusual sequence of events. In 1869 a sharp difference arose between the two Houses of Congress over the appropriations to pay for eleven treaties then just negotiated, and the sessipn closed with no appropriation for the Indian service., .The, necessity for some measure was ex treme: ,the plan was devised oi a bill which was passed at an extra session, putting twpsmillions of dollars in the hands of Pre...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 75 peaceable, and do not question the ways of the Great Father at Washington. Some are roving bands of Shoshones, dirty, ignorant, and shiftless the tramps of their race who are on every man's side at once. Some are Chilcats or Klinkas, whose Alaskan homes offer new problems of new kinds for every day we know them. And some are Cherokees, living in fine houses, dressed in the latest fashion, and spending their winters in Washington or St. Louis. Yet these, and many of other kinds, are all alike Indians. They have their own governments, their own unwritten laws, their own customs. As a race they are' neither worthless nor degraded. The Indian is not only brave, strong,' and able by inheritance and practice to endure, but he is patient under wrong,, ready and eager to learn, and willing to undergo much privation for that end: usually affectionate in his family rela tions, grateful to a degree, pure and careful of the honor of his wife and daughter: and he is also ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

76 THE INDIAN IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. sometimes with a stovepipe and sometimes without. Here the food is cooked, mostly stewed, in a kettle hung gypsy fashion, or laid on stones over the fire. Around the fire, each in a particular place of his own, lies or sits the whole family. Sometimes the cooking is done out of doors, and in summer the close cabin is exchanged for a tepee or tent. Here they live, night and day. At night a blanket is hung up, partition ing the tent for the younger women, and if the family is very large, there are often two tents, in the smaller of which sleep the young girls in charge of an old woman. These tents or cabins are clustered close together, and their inhabitants spend their days smoking, talking, eating, or quarreling, as the case may be. Sometimes near them, sometimes miles away, is the agent's house and the government buildings. These are usually a commissary building where the food for the In dian is kept, a blacksmith shop, the store of the tra...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1903

'JHE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 77 ciation and the Women's National Indian Association are the unofficial and voluntary guardians ot the Indian work. It is their task to spread correct information, to create intelli gent interest, to set in motion public and private forces which will bring about legislation, and by public meetings and pri vate labors to prevent wrongs against the Indian, and to further good work of many kinds. While the Indian Rights Association does the most public and official work for the race and has large influence over legislation, the Women's Indian Association concerns itself more largely with various philan thropic efforts in behalf of the individual, and thus the two bodies supplement each other. In 1887 a new step was taken for the advancement of the Indian, in the passage of the Severalty act, by which home steads of 160 acres were set aside for each head of a family willing to accept the proffer, and smaller homesteads for other members of the family. These were ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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