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Title: Pacific Rural Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Don't Rock the Cradle. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

Don't Rock the Cradle. If all the ultimate consequences of one's acts are to be laid to his charge, the man who invented rocking-cradles for children rests under a fearful load of responsibility. The downright murder of tens of thousands of infants, and the weakened brains of hundreds of thousands of adults, are undoubted results of this invention. To rock a child in a cradle, or to swing him in a crib, amounts to just this: the rapid motion disturbs the natural flow of the blood, and produces stupor or drowsiness. Can any body suppose for a moment that such an operation is a healthful one? Every one knows the dizzy and often sickening effect of moving rapidly in a swing; yet wherein does this differ from the motion a child receives when rocked in a cradle? It is equivalent to lying in a ship's berth during a violent storm, which sickens nine people out of ten. A very gentle, slow motion, may sometimes be soothing, though always of doubtful expediency; but to move the cradle as rapi...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Sound Sleep. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

Sound Sleep. Any man who can bound out of bed as soon as he wakes of a mid-winter's morning, is worth something. No fear of his not making his way through the world creditably, because he has the elements of apromtitude, decision and energy, which guarantee success. To invalids we make a comfortable suggestion worth knowing. If you have force of will enough to keep you from taking a second nap —and it is the " second nap" which makes its baneful influence felt on multitudes —it is better for you to lay awhile and think about it, until that feeling of weariness passes out of the limbs which you so commonly feel. But to sleep soundly and feel rested and refreshed when you wake up of a morning, four things are essential: 1. Go to bed with feet thoroughly dry and warm. 2. Take nothing for supper but cold bread and butter, and a single cup of tea of any kind. 3. Avoid over-fatigue of the body. 4. For the hour proceeding bed time, dismiss every engrossing subject from the mind, and let it...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Our Weekly Crop. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

Our Weekly Crop. The harvest is approaching, and the World Reaper and Mower has been brought out for inspection preparatory to the work. The knowledge we aoquire in our library # of Mechanical and Scientific Progress enables us to see and understand the improvements in this aud similar machines. From the Cajon Ranch, San Diego County, from Roble and from Half Moon Bay, good words of prosperity come to us. The need of a little more "Stick" in onr country is commented on. An interesting Decision for Settlers reaches us from the U. S. Land Office. We visit tho sheep ranch to see how it goes with the Wool Business. We are shown Angora and Common Goats, and are told and shown some interesting facts concerning a Disease of Sheep. Farm Novelties present themsi-lves here to onr view, and we glance over the Agricultural Notes of the Coast. For o\ir Small Fruit, thore is a demand for Cheap Cases, and a gentleman proposes a plan in this connection which is worthy of attention. Another plan is ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Fence Question. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

The Fence Question. The subject of our fence laws is being discussed throughout many of the agricultural counties with a great deal of interest and earnestness. It bids fair to become a vital question in the election of legislators, in many portions of the State, especially in the southern counties. We are glad to see this question discussed and the rights of all parties concerned adjudicated before the bar of public opinion. It is a subject of great interest to the agriculture of the State, and the sooner the policy of the State is settled in regard to it, the better for all concerned. Legislation should always bo in favor of tho greatest good to the greatest number. The first law upon the subject of fences in California was passed in 1850. At that time there was very littlo land under cultivation; but the country was full of cattle. It was not then supposed that agriculture proper would ever become a leading interest in the State. The breeding of cattle was already a great interes...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
How to Utilize Salt Marsh. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

How to Utilize Salt Marsh. "D. C. S." writes from Napa City as follows:—"I am trying to convert my salt marsh into some other kind of pasture; but havo thus far failed with every kind of seed which I have tried. I havo been told that in many places in New England, the owners of salt marsh have succeeded in converting such ground into good posture land. How has it been done?" Wo know of no bottor way to reclaim salt marsh than by draining, dykeing, and covering tho old sod with gravel to a depth suilicient to give a foot-hold for upland grass seeds. If any of our readers can furnish anything else, which will be of service to our correspondent, wo shall bo happy to give such information for tho benefifc/of salt marsh owners generally. , Imi'lioved Swine —and Where to Get Them. —In our last week's issuo we alluded to a call for " Improved Stock," in which a party was desirous of obtaining some good breed of swine for his place, near this city, and in our reply, overlooked tho fact that...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
PATENTS & INVENTIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

PATENTS & INVENTIONS.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Full List of U. S. Patents Issued to Pacific Coast Inventors. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

Full List of U. S. Patents Issued to Pacific Coast Inventors. [Fbom Official Repohts to DEWEY k CO., U. 8. and Foreign I'atk.nt Aoentb, and Pudmbhkbb of the Scientific Phkhb.] For the Week Ending May 23d. Printers' Furniture.—John Frederick Uhlhorn, Sacramento, Cal. Fastener for Doors and Windows.— Jacob Z. Davis, San Francisco, Cal. rmvi\—Frank Iliedol, San Francisco, Cal.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Notices of Recent Patents. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

Notices of Recent Patents. Among the patents recently obtained through Dewey & Co.'s Scientific Press American and Foroign Patent Agency, the following are worthy of notice: Operating Drills.— A. Blatcbly, S. P. Wo liuvo j)revioiisly deserib eel the valuable drill in vented by Dr. Blatehly and S2>okcn of the excel lent results obtained b} it. But the doctor ia ever seeking to improve on the past. His presen , invention relates to improvements in the devices for applying power to rock drilling machines, whereby power at the surface (as the hoisting, or pumping engine of a mine) can bo applied to operate any number o] drills on any level or in any shaft or chamber in the mine. The object is to obviate the many inconveniences which arise when tho engines are directly attached to tho drilling machines and form a part of them. At tho same time, he claims to get many important ad vantages by his method. * His invention consists also in the peculiar construction of a...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Editorial Notes Eastward.—5. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

Editorial Notes Eastward.—5. After my ride on the locomotive, I retired to a more comfortable resting place in the sleeping car. Here I lay for a while, listening to the regular beating of the wheels over the track, keeping time to our passage, and to the roar and crash as we rushed through the tunnels. I could reflect on the views which might have been seen, were not the blackness of night around us, of mountain lake and stream, yet contented with my comfortable position in the warm car,—all the more contented from my previous exposure. I thought of the beauties and the sad, romantic story of Dormer Lake, and of the .'-n mill) from Sim Iran' isc v. contrasting calmness of days on Lake Tahoe, which nestles under the snow-clad peaks whence it draws its life supplies. Hut my thoughts grew indistinct, and with them mingled the ever-present monotone of the train, until I was surprised to find that daylight was creeping into the car and that I had been sleeping soundly for hours. LAKES I...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Ornamental Stones of Nevada. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

Ornamental Stones of Nevada. Although neither diamonds, rubies, emeralds, or other precious stones have yet 246 miles from Snu Francisco-Alt. 6,.0.i feet. fi been found in this State, many stones suited to the uses of the lapidary, from their hardness and beauty, are abundant. Jasper of every variety and shade of color is abundant throughout the State; carnelian is to be found in many places, and is quite abundant at Oarnolian Bay, Lake Tahoe; agates are also plentiful at Lake Tahoe, at San Antonio, Nyo county, at Aurora, and in many other localities. Fine moss agates are often picked up by prospectors in their rambles among the wild mountain gorges and over the stony table lands. Amethysts are quite abundant in the various mines upon the Coinstock; those found in the mines at Gold Hill are the best. Garnets are to be found in Washoo county, near Steamboat Springs, but they are of an inferior quality. Chalcedony is to be found almost everywhere in the State. Fine specimens may be ob...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Searching for Diamonds. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

Searching for Diamonds. Several times persons have brought to us pieces of quartz crystals, enquiring whether they were diamonds. It is known that diamonds occur on our coast, although only very small ones, with one or two possible exceptions, have been found. Still, as it is very difficult for the unpracticed eye to distinguish the gem in its natural condition from quartz crystals or topaz, it is very possible that many a precious stone may have been passed by unnoticed. The diamond occurs of various shades and hues, as yellowish brown, green, blue and rose-red, the finest, however, being white (or colorless), and as it does not display its brilliancy in its rough condition, the unexperienced must test such stones as are suspected to be precious. The first test is, as to whether the suspected stone will cut glass or quartz with its sharp edge. A diamond will do so readily. When the specimens are too small to 'J7fi miles from Sun l-'raiuiaco—Altitude !i,l3Ofeet. be held between the ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE HOME CIRCLE [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

THE HOME CIRCLE BY OUR LADY EDITORS.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Helpful Harrie. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

Helpful Harrie. Perhaps you think Harrie WM a boy ? No, she was a girl. Her name was Harriot, only they called her Harrie, her brothers said, "for shortness." She was not only a girl, but she -was to a very great extent just what a girl ought to be. She had both eyes and hands, and she also had a hoad. Perhaps you will laugh and say that was not ut all strange, for she would have boon a very surprising girl indeed if she had been without these things. But there are girls who, though they have head and hands and eyes, do not at all make a good use of them; for they do not seem to think, they do not see what needs doing, and they do not use their hands to do the work that is lying all about waiting to be done. I am glad to say that Harrie was not at all thoughtless, neither was she idle. She liked doing things for other .people, and when a girl loves her work it is a good thing both for herself and for those around her. She is certain to do it well and cheerfully if her heart be in it...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Boys and Girls. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

Boys and Girls. Boys and girls are not the samo. They are born different and show it while they are infants. The boy-baby is restless and uneasy in his mother's arms. He is never still except when asleep, and even then tumbles from side to sido in his crib with sudden flings of arms and legs. When he grows beyond baby-hood he plays differently. Without ever being told of it he instinctively turns away from dolls; lays them aside in indifference, and freely donates them to whatever little girl will have them. He demands balls and bats and drums; he turns down chairs for horses, lavs hold on all the strings in the house for lines, wants all the little sticks made into whips, mounts lounges and drives four in hand; he asks for guns, and wants you to tell him stories of bears and lions and tigers, and is amused beyond measure at their leaping upon and eating up cows and oxen. The girl-baby is gentle, even from the first, and looks quietly out of the blue eyes, or laughingly out of the d...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
YOUNG FOLKS' COLUMN. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

YOUNG FOLKS' COLUMN.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Bessy's First Round Comb. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

Bessy's First Round Comb. I have got a round comb, and I will toll how I came to get it. One day when Aunt Lizzie was going down town she said, "Does ]3ossy want to go out walking with me?" Of course I did, and I told her so, and while sho was getting? ready, I went to ■wash my hands and fix my hair, 'cause it always comes in my eyes. Willy's grandma said to mo, "Did you ever havo a round comb, little one?" And I told her no, I never had one in all my life, 'oept cousin Ella's, which she tended to me, and it hurt my oars so I cut and cut it with the scissors till I broke it all up. Then that good grandma—not mine, but Willy's—gave mo a big silver money, and tolled me to let Aunt Lizzie buy me a comb and Ella a comb. How I did jump for joy, and cry, " jolly." Then Aunty put on my shaker hat and scarf and away we went. At the store Aunty set me up on the counter and asked the man if he had a round comb to fit this little head, and sho took my hat off and tried one on which fitted so n...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A Key to a Person's Name. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

A Key to a Person's Name. By the accompanying table of letters the name of any person or any word may be found in the following manner: A B D H P C C B' I Q E F P 3 Ii 0 a a k s 1 j l l t X X M M U M N N N V o o o <) w O 11 T X X S S V Z V U V V V Z w w w V Z Let the person whoso name you wish to know inform you in which of the upright columns the iirst letters of his name iseontuined. If it be found in but one column, it is the top letter; if it occurs in more thanono column, it is found by adding tho alphabetical /mmh,-r of the top letters of these columns, and the sum will be tho number of the letter sought. By taking one letter at a time in this way, the whole name can be ascertained. For example, take the word Jane. Jis found in the two columns commencing with B and H, which are the second and eighth lettors down the alphabet; the sum is ten and the tenth letter down the alphabet is J, tho letter sought. The next hitter, A, appears in but one column, where it stands ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A Toad Undressing. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

A Toad Undressing. Ho commences pressing his elbows hard against his sides and rubbing downward. After a few smart rubs his hide begin! to burst along his back. He keeps on rubbing until he works all his skin into folds onhis sides and hips; then grasping one hind leg with his hands, he hauls off one leg of his pants, the same as anybody would: then strips off the other hind leg in the same way. He then takes his cast off skin forward between his fore legs, and swallows it; then by raising and lowering his head, swallowing as his head comes down, he strips off his skin underneath, until it comes to his fore legs, then grasping one of those with the opposite hand, by a singlo motion of the head, and while swallowing, he draws it from the neck and swallows the whole. A little boy, three years old, who hafl a brother of three months, gave as a reason for tho latter's good conduct: Baby doesn't cry tears because he doesn't drink any water, and he can't cry milk." Playing at PoOTOB. —Ma,...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
DOMESTIC ECONOMY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

DOMESTIC ECONOMY.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Oysters in the Kitchen. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 10 June 1871

Oysters in the Kitchen. Oyster Sour.—Put two quarts of oysters, liquor and all, in a pan; set them on the stove to heat, but don't let them boil, or come very near to it; now drain all the liquor into your soup kettle, put in a pint of water and two quarts of new milk, half a pound of butter, a little whole allspice and pepper; have the oysters all this time where they will keep warm, add them and salt to taste; just as you are to serve the soup, break up some crackers tine and put into the soup before the oysters are jjut in. Bait should always be tho last thing put in any soup, stew or fricassee, where milk is ust'd, or it is apt to curdlo. Oysters should 06761 be boiled, but only scalded; it makes them tough and shrinks them all up; if they are to bo stowed, heat them hot, but don't boil them. Always have the sou}) or gravy hot. O ysteh Stew. —Put as many good oysters, with their liquor, as you think you will need, into a pan on the stove to heat, but not boil. Drain the houjj in...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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