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Elephind.com contains 8,145 items from Grenville Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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The Cause of the Trouble. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 11 December 1915

The Cause of the Trouble. Undoubtedly the man who has caused one of the' greatest sensa tions during the war is Mr. William' Jennings Bryan, whose recent resig nation from the post of Secretary of State to the U.S.A. was the talk of Europe. A very amusing story about Mr. Bryan is worth recalling just now. At a time when his opinions on for eign affairs were being eagerly sought for by the press he was giv ing an audience to a dozen or so re porters in his private office and hold ing forth to them in his most impas sioned style. In the course of his remarks he sat down on his desk, when sudden ly. he and his visitors were astonish ed to hear a terrific hubbub in the ante-room to the office. One after another, chiefs of various State de partments and their subordinates came running into the ante-room as though their very lives depended up on their celerity. Greatly puzzled and anxious to maintain quiet while the famous di plomat held forth to the journalists, Mr. Bryan's secretary, wh...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Could Not Be Done. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 11 December 1915

Could Not Be Done. Ac individual with considerably more lung power than was agreeable to his hearers was hawking fish the other morning in a northern town. "Fine fresh herrin'—fower a penny," he Toared, in a fashion that made the windows rattle. A woman approached the barrow and eyed the fish with a certain ap ount of suspicion, which, considering the circumstances, was not unnatu ral. "Are they fresh?" she demanded, with a suspicious sniff. "They're fower a penny, mum," was the guarded reply. "Yes," responded the other, with a touch of sarcasm, "I think I 'eard yer say so. But are they fresh?" "For aught X know, mum, they is." "When wor they cotched?" 'This was too much, and, adopting the sarcastic, style of his questioner, the hawker replied: "Can't say for sartin, mum. I ap plied for the birth an' death stificate of every fish on the barrer, but, at fower a penny, it simply couldn't be done! " 'Ere y'are! Fower a penny, her rin'." A chambermaid who had held a sit uation for sever...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
All Made Clear. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 11 December 1915

All Made Clear. A lady missionary in China was taking tea with, a mandarin's eight wives. The Chinese women examined her clothing, her hair, her teeth, and so on, but her feet especially amazed them. "Why," cried one, "you can walk and .run as well as a man." "Yes, tb be sure," said the mission ary. "Can you ride a horse and swim, too?" "Yes." "Then you must be as strong as a j man!" "I am." "And you wouldn't let a man beat you—-not even if he was your hus band—would you?" "Indeed, I wouldn't," the missionary said. The mandarin's eight wives looked at one another, nodding their heads. Then the oldest said, softly: — "Now I understand why the foreign devil never has more than one wife. He is afraid."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE HOUSEHOLD. SELECTED RECIPES. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 11 December 1915

THE HOUSEHOLD. SELECTED RECIPES. , Baked ^s*—Place six sliced hard boiled eggs in a butter dish and pour over them a sauce made by stirring over the fire the following ingredi ents—a tablespoonful of grated ham, an ounce of grated cheese, the same quantity of butter, half a cupful of stewed tomatoes, a cupful of white stock flavored with the juice of a lemon, and a little nutmeg, parsley, pepper and salt. This should be cook ed twenty minutes and strained before adding to the eggs. Cover the whole with a fairly thick layer of bread crumbs and grated cheese, and bake in a quick oven. Fried Tongue.—Cooked tongue, lem on juice, egg, and breadcrumbs. Cut some cooked tongue in neat slices. Sea son them with pepper, salt, if neces sary, and a little lemon juice, and let them lie for half an hour or so. Then egg and breadcrumb them and fry in boiling fat to a nice brown color. Dish up neatly, garnishing with cut lemon and parsley, and serve with any suit able sauce. Rabbit Mould.—Select a ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A New Kind of Stone. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 11 December 1915

A New Kind of Stone. The announcement that Mr. Chas. M. Schwab, the famous millionaire "steel king," has offered to place the celebrated Bethlehem Steel Works at the disposal of France, has naturally been received with great rejoicings by our Allies. Although he has such a wonderful business head, Mr. Schwab is by no means above a joke, a characteristic which dates from his early school days. • It is recorded that one day his schoolmaster asked the scholars to bring specimens of various stones to the -class in geolog^ for him to de scribe them to the pupils. Young Schwab, thinking to have a joke at the expense of the teacher, brought half a brick and laid it with an air of mock innocence among the other specimens. -- The master took up the specimens one by one. "This," he said, "is a piece of feldspar from the cross roads. This is a piece of argilla ceous sandstone from the quarry. And this"—he paused, and his voice changed ominously—"is a piece of impudence from Charles Schwab!"

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Grenville Standard, THE PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. Printed awl published by LIONEL SPARROW, sole Proprietor, at the office of the "Grenville Standard" newspaper, Clyde street, Linton, in the State of Victoria. Registered at the General Post Office, Melbourne, for transmission as a newspaper. SATURDAY, DEC. 11, 1915. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 11 December 1915

I'Hifi PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. Printed awl published by LIONEL Sparrow, solo Proprietor, at the office o£ the "Grenville Standard" newspaper, Clyde street, Linton, in the State of Victoria. Registered at the General Post Office, Melbourne, for transmission as a newspaper. SATURDAY, DEO. 11, 1915. Great Britain has always depended on the voluntary system of enlistment for the recruiting of her army and navy ; and it is her pride that she has ever been victorious with her volunteers over the conscript hordes of the Continent. The claim is, however, somewhat vitiated by the fact that the voluntary method has always been more or less modified in time of stress. The losses in the navy were made good by means of the press gang, which was brutal and oppressive to a degree hardly credible now. Press gangs were! sometimes completely wiped oat by infuriated merchant sailors who objected to being forced into the ISTavy. The means used to maintain the army's strength were milder. Zealous recr...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 11 December 1915

Indian Motocycl NEW 1915 MODELS— ..■wfflfSSgSfials. 4-h.p. Single-cylinder Models, spring . -frame, free-aaglise - -- "J|§fl 31 h.p. Twins - - - - £61 7-h.p. Twins - - - - £68 Mine Prominent Improvements on 1915 Models. Write to-day for illustrated Catalog, for warded post free. MASSEY BICYCLE DEPOT Sole District Kgent, 123 Sturt St., Ballarat Tel. 505. Opp. Post Office. Perfect Bridal Portraits No Wedding nowadays is considered complete'Without the Bridal Portrait, and no Bridal Portrait is considered satisfactory unless it bears the name of RICHARDS & CO. This name is a guarantee that your Bridal Portrait will possess all the qualities that go to make a perfect picture. The latest style in wedding portraiture is the beautiful new Royal Panel introduced by Richards & Co.—size, 10 x 8. ' Bridal Veils, Bouquets, Wreaths, Buttouholes, «fcc., the latest styles kept at the studio. PORTRAITS OF SOLDIERS Let us make you a beautiful permanent enlargement of your Soldier Son...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AUSTRALIAN AS A FIGHTER ENGLISHMEN'S APPRECIATION. "THE KIND OF CHAP HE IS." LONDON, October 1. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 11 December 1915

A US fRALIAN AS A FIGHTER ENGLISHMEN'S APPRECIATION. "THE KIND OF CHAP HE IS." LONDOxX, October 1. A friend seiius me a typical appre ciation or Australians as figmers, torn irom the diary of a Mancnester riiieman who rought by their side. 1 may say that these soldiers' diaries are the continual worry of the gen eral staff, which fears lest valuable inlorniation snould get into 'rurkisn hands. The English and the Austra lian boy who goes to war likes to make notes of nis progress, and the Turk searches all our dead lor diaries, unaer shelter of night. We know from various sources that if the Turk had lound tlie lollowing passage he would nave read it with approval — "The Australians are big, oroad-stooulderea, bare-iegged giants of the open air, uronzeu by tne sun of their native ianu, the inevitable pipe stuck corner wise in the mouth, and the sou slouch hat at just that angle which tne colonial knows to be best from long experience. One cannot pass these Australians by without com...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LOCAL AND GENERAL. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 11 December 1915

LOCAL AND GENERAL. The anniversary of the Linton Metho dist Sunday school will be celebrated to morrow (Sunday), when the Rev. A. P. Watsford,' of Ballarat; will preach at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m., and address the parents and scholars at 3 p.m. Collec tions will betaken up at each service in aid of the school funds. On Monday evening a grand entertainment will be givsn in the church by the scholars. A cantata, " In Quest of Happiness," will be performed, and there will also be recitations, action songs, musical items, and dialogues. Mr R. Ching, superin tendent, will preside. Admission is Is for adults and 6d for children under 15 years. The Linton State school scholars recently made up a number of parcels containing comforts, etc., for the sol diers at the front. The head teacher, Mr Jas. O'Shea, has received an acknow ledgment from the secretary of the ex ecutive committee. Education Depart ment War Relief Fund, conveying the | sincere thanks of the committee to the pupils, parents, and...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Stick It. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 11 December 1915

Stick It. When yer luck jest turns and hops it, When yer feelin' tired and blue, Jest remember, "Dogged cops it," Set yer teeth an' see it through. Don't give way to grouse an' spite, Square yer shoulders—that's the ticket. Be a man—go in an' fight, Square yer shoulders, man, an' "stick it." When yer feelin' down an' out, Feel yer done, and must give in, Jest think on, there ain't no doubt He that sticks it's bound to win. Talk of Pate is simply drivel; Fate wants beatin'—that's the tic ket. Let cowards whine and cry an' snivel, Square yer shoulders, man, an' "stick it." When the things yer've set yer mind on Seem a' prize yer'll never get, And yer've but to look behind on Barren years of toil an' sweat, Keep on fightin',' play the game, Soon yer'll stump misfortune's wicket. An' keep yer right to manhood's name, Square yer shoulders, man, an' "stick it." About the only satisfactory substi- j tute for wisdom is silence. I

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Dropsy. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 11 December 1915

Dropsy. Dropsy is an accumulation of watery fluid beneath the skin or in one or more of the cavities of the body. Like some other symptoms, it is often mistaken for a disease in it self, and we constantly hear it said that someone has "died of dropsy." But people do not die of a symptom; they die of the disease that lies 'be hind the 'symptom. Any disorder that causes the blood to become im poverished and watery, and at the same time to flow through the veins with increased pressure, can cause dropsy. For that reason it is often associated with serious forms of heart or kidney disease. When the heart is diseased it can not pump the blood through the veins properly, the blood itself grows thin and poor in quality, and some of the watery serum escapes through the walls of the capillary vessels. When dropsy is the result of Bright's dis ease it is because the kidneys are no longer able to extract water and poisonous matters from the blood. Dropsy that arises from heart trou I ble is wo...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 11 December 1915

The thoroughness---the keenness of "Rolfe" mechanics to your | guarantee of satisfaction. Because they are genuine repairs. We specialise in making piston rings, reboring cylinders and all motor repairs. Our workshop is equipped with one of the finest electric lathes in the trade. Are for the man that wants pace - --stability-- -economy-- -comfort. A trial 'a the thing—getcna. I For business men, for tourists, or ' for record-breakers they are THE machines. Every cycle: is guaran teed fully. You, can , buy with confidence from £6110 -So £12110 "Rolfe'a" .easy payment. plan IS easy. The Cycle Expert, 'msirc 'Phone S63. f HEREFORE it will pay you. to .sow the beBt Seeds ob tainable. ■ You can get them from us, and they cost no more than those you have been using, but your bank account "will tell a tale at the end of the season. Larger yields—better prices greater profits—are only a few of the advantages to be derived when you buy your Seeds from BALLARAT'S BIG SEED STORE, ARMSTRONG ST...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Treatment of Cuts. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 11 December 1915

Treatment of Cuts. A cut on a child's hand should never be neglected. Children are so reckless that, unless great pain is felt, they will go on playing after the injury has been received, getting dirt and all kinds of impurities into the wound. Where this is the case it is imperative that the cut should be thoroughly cleansed before any at tempt at dressing is made. A thor ough sponging with cold or tepid water, allowing a stream to run free ly from the sponge into the wound, will .perfectly cleanse it, and it is a good plan to put a little boiracic acid into the water. If the cut is very deep and ragged, and you have rea son to believe that there is still some substance to be removed, cold bread poultices frequently applied for twenty-four hours will draw it out. In either case, as soon as the cut is cleansed, draw the edges together by straps of sticking-plaster and fasten a narrow linen bandage around it.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MEDICAL MEMS. Erysipelas. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 11 December 1915

MEDICAL MEMS. Erysipelas. Erysipelas is very infectious. Those who are reduced by certain disor ders, by ■ Bright's disease, any form of chronic poisoning, exhaustion from overwork or poor food, are especially lilc.ely to be attacked; but it is rare in extreme infancy, and still more rare in old age. It generally attacks the face, and begins with a chill, which is often prolonged and severe. There are al so other symptoms of an acute infec tion, such as headache, loss of appe tite, a general feeling of illness, and sometimes vomiting. The chill is followed by a rise of temperature. The glands of the neck become swollen and tender. - Then the eruption appears at the angle of the nostril, or the corner of the eye or around the ear, and rapidly spreads from that point. The skin becomes red and glistening, and* the swelling is sometimes so great that the .patient is not recognisable. Where the tissues are loose, as around the eyes, there may be much swelling without great pain; but ■whe...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
In Diarrhoea. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 11 December 1915

In Diarrhoea. W(hen anyone is suffering from diarrhoea the following will be found a good drink:—To half a pint of fresh inew milk add a little powdered cin namon, some powdered white sugar, and a teaspoonful of brandy. This may be taken either hot or cold.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Electric Poultices. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 11 December 1915

Electric Poultices. Some medical men are applying electric poultices for stiff necks, sprains, and colds. The new poul tice is an asbestos mat enclosing a n.-twork of flexible wires, and in use is connected to an ordinary electric lamp socket,' a very even tempera ture up to about one hundred and sixty degrees Fahrenheit being thus maintained.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PRUNE-GROWING IN CALIFORNIA [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 11 December 1915

PRUNE-GROWING IN CALIFORNIA Mr. E. Clifton, New Zealand Trade Commissioner, San Francisco, contri butes the following note:— This year's prune crop of Santa Clara County, California, is estimated at 85,000,0001b. weight, and it is ex pected that it. will be sold at the rate of five cents (2%d.) per pound. The acreage from which this crop is har vested is 53,000 acres. The Santa Clara Valley is thirty-seven miles from San Francisco, its county town be'ng San Jose.- It may 'be said that th?s county lives entirely on the prune. It extends across a long sweeping valley to the low foothills, every acre in intense cultivation, a great part of it levelled for irriga tion. The members of the press delega tion who visited this valley lately were greatly interested. To travel for miles along a well-formed asphalt ed road as smooth as a city street, with orchards on either side unpro tected by fencing, is a revelation to us from other countries where or chards are jealously guarded. The extent...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FOR THE FARMER. WHEN THE PIG CAN'T USE ITS LEGS. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 11 December 1915

FOR .THE FARMER. WHEN THE PIG CAN'T USE ITS LEGS. Paralysis of the pig, .a, common ailment, arises from a variety of causes. It is a symptom, not a dis ease. It is sometimes curable, but is almost always intractable, being eas ier to prevent .than to cure. It may appear suddenly or gradu ally. In the first case the animal may be well at night and unable to rise in the morning. More frequent ly, however, the paralysis follows a period during which a progressive difficulty in 'walking has been in evi dence. Slight unsteadiness is follow ed by a weaving or rolling gait, the animal's hind-quarters appearing un able to follow the line of progression of the front limbs. Sometimes the hind feet cross each other in walking, or the hind legs may be thrown outward. Finally the paralysis becomes complete, and the pig can neither stand nor use the hind limbs in walking, dragging them painfully along the ground. The causes are varied:—Excessive deposit of fat in the region of the back; injuries,...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Stormy Meal. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 11 December 1915

A Stormy Meal. President Woodrow Wilson, "whose firm attitude towards Germany has earned for him world-wide admira tion, is not a "hustler" like so many of his countrymen. 'The story goes that some time ago he tried one of the American "quick lunches," with results far from satis factory to his peace of mind. Not long afterwards he met a friend who questioned him on his experience. "Well," said the friend, "I hear you have been indulging in the popular habit of the quick feed." "Yes," answered Mr. Wilson grim ly. "I had a lightning lunch, and it was quickly followed by thundering pains!" « ■ In order to enjoy life a man must he a little miserable occasionally.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Would Have Beaten the Engine. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 11 December 1915

Would Have Beaten the Engine. It is not often that Lord Curzon allows himself to make a joke, t>ut when he does he can he very witty. On one occasion he was travelling by train to address a political meet ing at a certain town, and he was much disgusted at the extremely slow rate at which the train- went. Stop pages, and lengthy ones at that, were so numerous that at last his lordship could stand it no longer. Putting his head out of the window at one of the stations, he called the guard and told him in no uncertain terms what he thought of the railway. "Well, if you don't like the rate we're going at," replied the guard surlily, "why don't you get out and walk?" "I would," answered Lord Curzon instantly, "only they don't expect me at the other end until the train gets in."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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