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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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SIZED UP. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

  SIZED UP.   "A man is known by his works," declared the irrepressible reformer, who was addressing a large and enthusiastic audience. "Yours must be a gas works!" shouted a rude uncultured person, who occupied a back seat.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE AUTO-HOUSEBOAT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

THE AUTO-HOUSEBOAT.   —♦— The auto-houseboat is to be the thing of the future. An Englishman, says the "Whitehall Review," Mr. Ernest Archdeacon, a well-known chauffeur and balloonist (who spent his honey- moon in a houseboat), announces his intention of establishing a houseboat club in Paris. The members are to form a caravan of floating domiciles to visit French, German, Dutch, and Belgian rivers and canals. Mr. Archdeacon de- clares that the gasolene motor, which has been perfected through the impetus of long-distance automobile racing, has evolutionised the house- boat. It can be adapted astern without loss of space, thus dispensing with the nuisance of towage. Thus will our summer holidays be revolutionised —and in a most agreeable manner.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GREAT BELLS OF THE WORLD. SOME STRIKING FACTS. (SPECIAL TO "THE WORLD'S NEWS.") [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

GREAT BELLS OF THE WORLD. SOME STRIKING FACTS. (SPECIAL TO "THE WORLD'S NEWS.") —♦—   Regarding size and weight, Russia and China   take the lead with their great bells. In Moscow   there are three of enormous size—that in St.   Ivan's Church weighing 127,836 English pounds;   another weighs 288,000lb.; and a third, not less   than 443,772lb. This last-mentioned is the   largest bell in the world, and said to have been   founded in 1653. Its height to 21ft. 4½in., its   circumference (2ft. above the extremity of the lip) is 67ft. 4in., its diameter 22ft. 5in., and its greatest thickness 23in. The supposed value of the metal contained in this monster is £66,565 16s. This bell, however, has never struck a note. It was cast in a great cavern underneath the Kremlin, and lay for nearly two centuries, half-buried in the sand in which it was moulded. A fracture upon one of i...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HER CHOICE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

HER CHOICE.   It was in the tram-car, and two girls were talking of what they read. "Oh, I choose a novel easily enough," one said. "I go to the circulating library and look at the last chapters. If I find the rain softly and sadly dropping over one or two lonely graves, I don't have it; but if the morning sun is glimmering over bridal robes of white satin, I know it's all right."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A CURIOUS HOTEL BILL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

—♦—   A CURIOUS HOTEL BILL.     The following is a copy of an interesting hotel bill of 176 years ago, which is preserved at the White Hart Hotel, Windsor (England), the ac- tual date of settlement on it being April 22, 1725:— "Windsor White Hart. Thomas and Betty Adams, who removed from the Star and Garter three years since to the White Hart, are still living there, although it has of late been maliciously reported to the contrary. £ s. d. "Bread, beare, chees, and tobacher ... 0 7 11 "for wine ... 0 5 0 "a leg of mutton ... 0 4 0 "speneg and buttor ... 0 1 6 "a quarter of lamb ... 0 5 0 "salot oyle. vinegar, egs ... 0 2 0 "firing ... 0 16 "for the coach hier ... 0 5 0 "for radaches and buttor ... 0 0 6 £1 12 6 "servts ... 0 1 6 It is stated that Shakespeare stayed at this hotel.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Treasure Hunt. COMBINATION OF BUSINESS AND PLEASURE. ATTRACTIVE PROSPECTUS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

A Treasure Hunt. COMBINATION OF BUSINESS AND PLEASURE. —♦— ATTRACTIVE PROSPECTUS. A treasure-hunting expedition was being or- ganised in London on distinctly novel lines when the last mail left. The promoters believe that immense wealth, consisting of money, jewellery, gold, silver, church ornaments, and precious stones, was buried by pirates "on an island or islands not far from the West Indies." Two attempts have already been made to find the treasure, and though they failed it is expected that this third attempt will be successful, "owing to past searches having narrowed down the limited area of the island to be explored." The pioneers tried to find the gold and gems by laborious digging. The new expedition will take steam boring apparatus and drills, which will test the ground more speedily. The idea of the Treasure Island Expedition is that it should go out in a large steam yacht, and take a smaller one along, and combine business with pleasure. The promoters' guests are to be ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FURIOUS ANTI-SEMITISM. THIRTEEN JEWS MURDERED IN A GALICIAN VILLAGE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

FURIOUS ANTI-SEMITISM. THIRTEEN JEWS MURDERED IN A GALICIAN VILLAGE. An outburst of anti-Semitism has produced tragic consequences in the village of Zavisna, near Sokal, in Galicia. A Jewish publican there excited popular re- sentment by practising usury, and selling up victims who were unable to meet his exorbitant demands. Recently the whole Gentile population of the village assembled, stormed the inn kept by the usurer, and murdered him, his wife, and daugh- ter, mutilating all three terribly. Afterwards the villagers proceeded to the houses of all the other Jews, dragged them out of their homes, and murdered them. Their wives and children were spared. The total number of Jews killed was 13.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
REFRAINS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

REFRAINS.   She (at the piano): "Listen; how do you enjoy   this refrain ?"   He: "Very much. The more you refrain the   better I like it."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SACK LIFTER AND LOADER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

SACK LIFTER AND LOADER. The apparatus here depicted has been de-   vised specially for the use of farmers, corn and   seed merchants, and others who require loading   and unloadlng of carts and lorries carried out   with speed and efficacy. The apparatus is shown   in fig. 1, and it is claimed that with a few turns   of the handle one man can lift a full sack into   position ready to carry away or to shoot into   an empty sack, while, by its use, two men can   load a waggon or lorry in record time. Fig. 2   shows the sack lifted into position to allow of its   contents being transferred to another container.   The machine is entirely without complications,   and being mounted on two small wheels may be   readily moved from place to place. It is the sort   of arrangement which should be popul...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHEN TO BRUSH THE TEETH. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

WHEN TO BRUSH THE TEETH. —♦— If the teeth are to get but one thorough cleans- ing during the day, just before retiring is the best time to give it to them. There are six or eight hours during sleep when the salivary glands are inactive, and fatty starchy food that may be lodged between and around the teeth is bathed in saliva, a partially digestive fluid, and undergoes decomposition, forming acids which act more or less readily on the tooth structure at the time of its formation. The salivary glands not being active during sleep, acids are not diluted as during the day when a free flow of saliva prevents to a great degree the deleterious effects of acids thus formed.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LIMP TOO. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

LIMP TOO. Surgeon (addressing students at the hospital):   "The muscle of the left leg of the patient has   contracted till it is considerably shorter than the   right leg, therefore he limps. Now, what would   you do under such circumstances?"   Intelligent Student: "Limp, too!"

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GERMAN ANGLOPHOBIA. CHAMBERLAIN'S STINGING RETORT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

GERMAN ANGLOPHOBIA. CHAMBERLAIN'S STINGING RETORT. The importance of the speech delivered by Mr. Chamberlain on Saturday evening, January 11th, at the Grand Hotel, Birmingham, may be gauged by the following points:— (1). He would not withdraw nor qualify anything. —"What I have said, I have said." (2). He would not give a lesson to a foreign Min- ster nor would he accept one from him. (3). Against partisans who fouled their own nest he entered an earnest protest. (4). Six burning questions of international impor- tance had been settled by Lord Salisbury's Go- vernment.   (5). We were not entitled to make peace except   upon terms satisfactory to our Colonial al-   lies.   (6). England was proud of Lord Kitchener, proud   of her army, and proud of Lord Milner. ' (7). We had wiped the slate clean; we had writ- ten on it principles of just and honest go- . vernnent.   The occasion on which the speech was deli...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PAID BY LEYDS. OUTSPOKEN CONFESSION OF A DUTCH PAPER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

PAID BY LEYDS. OUTSPOKEN CONFESSION OF A DUTCH PAPER. A most serious admission, and one which should come as a shock to the pro-Boers all over the world, has been made by a Rotterdam paper. It has been stated over and over again that Dr. Leyds is at the head of the movement on the Continent which exists to circulate calumnies against the British. He has done this by Boer money, which a number of papers have always been ready to accept. Dr. Leyds, in fact, is the chief instigator of the lies that have appeared in the Continental press with regard to British cruelty. One paper, and that a Dutch one—the "Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant"—now thinks the time   has arrived to remember that there is in such a thing as journalistic honesty, and it accordingly   makes the following startling announcement:—   When we published accounts of Boer wounded   and prisoners being killed at Elandslaagte, it   was at the instigation of the ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN INTERESTING CENTENARY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

AN INTERESTING CENTENARY. —♦— On Christmas Eve, 1801, the first load of pas- sengers ever moved by the force of steam was conveyed by Trevithick's locomotive—"Captain Dick's Putter," as it was called—through Cam- borne (England). It was towards evening and there was heavy rain when "Captain Dick" got up steam out in the high road just outside the shop at Weith. There were seven or eight passengers, and, though it was a stiffish hill going from the Weith up to Camborne Beacon, the strange-looking vehicle "went off like a bird." It had to mount a rough piece of road covered with loose stones, and its pace slackened, though it went "faster than I can walk," as one of the passengers long afterwards testified. At the further trial on the following day, a casting broke, and the abandoned machinery lay by the roadside for many years. But one result of these experiments was the immediate applica- tion for a patent, granted March 24, 1802, to Tre- vithick and Vivian tor steam engines for pro...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MARRIED IN HASTE. SUICIDE'S PATHETIC LIFE STORY. EARLY MARRIAGES CONDEMNED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

MARRIED IN HASTE. SUICIDE'S PATHETIC LIFE STORY. —♦— EARLY MARRIAGES CONDEMNED.   Marrying while in his teens, without even the   money to pay the clergyman's fees, Eustace Cecil   Talboys, after a fifteen years' struggle for exist-   ence, took his life with a revolver to end his   troubles on January 10.   Talboys, who was a clerk in the Victoria   Mutual Insurance Company, and lived at West-   horpe-street, Putney, was a good husband and   the best of fathers until two years ago, when   he lost some money. At the same time he bor-   rowed £700 on a reversion, and purchased a house   for £375.   His life story, contained in a letter to the   secretary of the company, is pathetic in the ex-   treme. It reads:— "Dear Sir,—I much regret I have to leave you so abruptly, but no one more than yo...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BOYALTIES IN HOTELS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

ROYALTIES IN HOTELS. —♦— In the "Traveller" appears an interesting ar-   ticle on the management of big hotels. "When you have royalties stopping here," the writer asked Mr. Autor, of the Carlton, "is not their safety a considerable strain and anxiety to you, or do you let the police authorities take all re- sponsibility?" was a question suggested by glanc- ing over the visitors' list. "No," said Mr. Autor; "the outside police are not even warned—or not by us; we do all our own 'guarding' with our own trusted servants. "If any unknown visitor or guest appears on the scene at such a time he would be watched, but without his knowing it. Supposing a royalty is coming to dine or stay here. Only the mana- ger, the chef, and one or two trusted servants know anything about it. "When he arrives I receive him, and only the waiter who serves him and myself really come near him. But our most trusted people are placed at various coigns of vantage—everyone not known is under close s...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ONE HUNDRED AND TWO YEARS AGO. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1800. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

ONE HUNDRED AND TWO YEARS AGO. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1800. Owing to the courtesy of Mr. J. Macgregor   Dunn, of "Kingudie," Lismore, it is possible to give interesting extracts from "The Edinburgh Evening Courant" of Saturday, February 22, 1800. The coincidence is that the Saturday this year also happens to be February 22. Here is one interesting specimen of a Parliamentary report:— PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE. HOUSE OF COMMONS, FEBRUARY 19. Mr. Mainwaring brought in a bill for improv- ing the port of London, which was read a first time. The Speaker, having been to the House of Lords, acquainted the House on his return that his Majesty's assent had been given by commis- sion to the Newfoundland Judicature Bill, the Navy and Army Reduction Bill, and the Militia Bill. Lord Hawkesbury brought in a bill for pro- hibiting the sale of bread until after it shall have been baked 24 hours, which was forwarded through all its stages, and immediately passed. The bill takes effect in L...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NOBLESSE OBLIGE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

NOBLESSE OBLIGE. —♦— There is more joy in Heaven over one sinner that repenteth than over ninety and nine just persons. The other day in the German Parlia- ment, when the Tariff Bill was discussed, Herr Bebel, in opposing the attempt to raise further the price of bread, mentioned a boy who had told his schoolmaster that he would like to go to Heaven, because there he need not starve. He was interrupted by Count Von Arnim, one of the richest of German noblemen, who cynically remarked that the boy's father had most likely spent his money in drink. These words aroused a storm of indignation, and even the political friends of the Count sharply criticised them, the more so as they proved a formidable weapon in the hands of the Social Democrats. Count Arnim has now evidently seen that he was in the wrong (writes the Berlin correspon- dent of the "Daily News"). He asked a friend, therefore, to make inquiries about the family in question, and it turns out that they are really very poor. Cou...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A MODERN TEST. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

A MODERN TEST. Mrs. Gramercy: "What do you consider being shabby-genteel?" Mrs. Park: "When you are able to keep a car- riage, but can't afford a horseless one."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHERE THE WORLD WOOS SLEEP. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

WHERE THE WORLD WOOS SLEEP. —♦— In this country the unhealthy feather bed is being driven out by the healthier mattress, which also rules in America. French beds are noted for their hardness, and German beds are so ridiculously short that foreign visitors are often much too big for them. Many Norwegian beds are made to pull out from re- cesses. The hammock rules in South and Cen- tral America. Japanese lie upon matting laid on the floor, with a stiff, uncomfortable wooden head-rest. The Chinese use low bedsteads, often elaborately carved. Of all people the easiest to suit in the   way of sleeping quarters are negroes,   An African negro, like a wild animal, can curl   up anywhere.   —"Health."   1 Colonel Templer, director of the Army Balloon Factory at Aldershot, has stated in an Interview 1 with M. Emmanuel Aime that he hopes soon tc 1 put into execution his project of a ateerable bal i loon over the camp.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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