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Elephind.com contains 12,833 items from Waynesburg Messenger, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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FUBiM EFaCTlTMl 8! C0LI1IHS [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 26 February 1862

FUBiM EFaCTlTMl 8! C0LI1IHS Rebel Prisoners Want to take the Oath Six Thousand Prisoners Sent to Cairo ! Ths Rebels Surrendering Themselves. ; LAHOE QUANTITY OF i RO VISIONS FOtTJTD Gov Harris Ord.riag TtnuetittSBI f Lay Down Their Arms. | CHICAGO , February, 16. —A special to the Times , dated Cairo, February 18th. says: Colonel Buford , with a small force, went down the river on a reconnoisance to-dav, and when ! within four miles of Columbus a heavy cannonading was heard , not , however, with any regularity. On coming across the river where he could obtain a view of the place , he discovered a heavy cloud of smoke covering a large space. Col. Buford believed the affair to be that tiie rebels were dismounting guns and blowing up their magazine , preparatory to evacuating the place. A large number of rebel prisoners were brought down yesterday.— They belonged on the Cumberland rivet*, and as they passed their homes they looked wistfull y for some face of recognition. Many w...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
EVACUATION OF BOWLING GREEN!! [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 26 February 1862

EVACUATION OF BOWLING GREEN!! FEDERAL. FORCES In PURSUIT! GENERAL BUELL TAKES COMMAND! Eighty Thousand Federal Troops on the Cuibberlaiid 1 CINCINNATI, February 17.—This morning the Commercial has the following:—On learning that the rebels were evacuating Bowling Green Gen. Buell ordered a forced march by Mitchell, to save, if possible, the Railroad and turnpike bridges on Big Barren river. They had, however, been destroyed when Mitchell reached the banks of the river. The brigade bf Breckinridge and Hind man were united on Thursday evening at Woodland station. The rebels left nothing at Bowling Green, except a few old wagons, Part of the town is reported as being burnt. It is believed now that there are no rebel forces in Kentucky east of the direct road from Bowling Green, via Franklin, to Nashville. Crittenden is trying to organize another army at Carthage, on the south bank of the Cumberland. This is the only rebel force on the line from Cumberland to Nashville. Breckinr...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Battle on the Cumberland! [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 26 February 1862

Battle on the Cumberland! Extent of tie Rebel Fortifications j TERRIFIC CHAnGtS ON THE ENEMY! j \ THE SLAUGHTER ON OUR SIDE! | • Splendid Courtage of our Troops r ) —-I—...... ¦-¦ m, ¦ ! Spicy Correspondence between Leaders—Gen. Grant Wanting in Chivalry—Our Dead and Wounded. CHICAGO, Feb. 17 —A special from Fort Donelson, to the Times says j The forces engaged were about equal ¦ in numbers, but the rebels had all I the advantage of position , being forj tified by two immense hills, with ! their fort near the river on a level : p iece of ground From the fort their ' entrenchments, rifle pits, abattis, &c, ! extended up the river, behind the j town ot Dover; their fortifications ¦ on the land side, back from the river, ¦ were at least four miles in length.— | Their water battery, in the centre of I the fortification, where it came down j to the river, mounted nine heavy i guns. The rebels were sure of sucj cess, and in any other cause, against ¦ less brave troops, the...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
— ¦ i ! mm mwmw [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 26 February 1862

— ¦ i ! mm mwmw ¦¦ T7 - ** - "''. j J0HN«)N, BUCtCNCfi & PILLOW TAKER ! | _ ¦ - ; 10,000 Prisoners Captured!! FIVE THOUSAND BEBELS ESCAPED j Ten Thousand Killed or Disabled! FLOYD'S LAST ACHIEVEMENT! .Steals Hlmseir out of Danger! | THE REBELS CALL HIM A COWARD! | j Killed and Wounded ou the Gunboats! ! I CINCINNATI , February 17.—Fort J Donelson was taken yesterday, with | fifteen thousand prisoners , including j Buekner and Johnson. [ SECOND DISPATCH .] I ST.Louis, February 17.—Dispatches from Gen. Grant to Gen. Halleck ! announce, the surrender of Fort Donj elson, with fifteen thousand prisoners, including Generals Johnston, Buekner and Pillow. [ THIRD DISPATCH .] ST.-Louis, February 17.—Further official advices from Fort Donelson say that Floyd escaped during the night, and the rebels in the fort denounced him as a black-hearted traitor and coward. The enemy are known to have had thirty thousand troops, fifteen thousand of whom are our prisoners.— Five thousand...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Further mm of the Battle! [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 26 February 1862

Further mm of the Battle! ITS DESPERATION AND BLOODINESS! Pluck and Heroism of our Troops! REBELS FIGHT IJKG DEVILS! THE SU0KEBS FIGHT LIKE HEE0ES! Tbey are Swept off by whole Companies I Bloodiest Battle ever Fought In America—WUole Acres of Dead Bodlesl CINCINNATI. February 18.—Following is the account of Saturday's fi ghting at Fort Donelson: On Saturday morning the battle was resumed with unusual vigor and determination. The 8th, 18th, 20th and 31st Illinois occupied a position above the fort. They were about preparing a little food, when the rebels opened on them with a fire'of musketry. The line of battle was at once formed, and the storm ofleaden hail returned, perceptibly thinning the rebel ranks. The rebels, from their advantageous position, showered upon our ranks most murderous volleys of musketry, grape and cannister, killing and wounding our men almost by companies at every round. Yet eyery man stood his ground—bravely, determinedly, without flinching. These f...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Gloomy Prospects for the Bebels in Tennessee. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 26 February 1862

Gloomy Prospects for the Bebels in Tennessee. BALTIMORE , Feb. 14.—The Kichmond Dispatch says that our Tennessee exchanges give us g loomy prospects for the future in that part of the Confederacy. Several journals intimate plainly that there is really a threatening state of affairs in East Tennessee growing out of the idolatrous love ot many of these people for the old Union. The Memphis Avalanche states that the condition of the interior counties are not improved by the lapse of time. The people apprehend an immediate advance of the north men and traitors to the South , and evince their joy in every village and neighborhood. The Unionists are making demonstrations in many of the northern counties, and even at Memphis there were exhibitions of joy ou the arrival of the news from Beech Grove. Armed bands of Johnston's and Maynard's followers are prowling abeot in _ all directions through the mountains and in remote counties. Many persons have been shot at night in jtoeir own ho...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
From Fort Henry. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 26 February 1862

From Fort Henry. CHICAGO, Feb. 14.—A special dispatch to the Evening Journal, dated Port Henry, Feb. 12th, says that the expedition under command of Col. Reggie, returned to Fort Henry to-day, from up the Tennessee river, having captured $75,000 worth of contraband goads, at Paris, Tennessee, They also foand the tents and camp aanipage of tha troops thai laftlNsttgaB ^r. , ¦'T'lp^, y»^Hi^ss^^Tfl|Wa»r|^.| ^ffWff'^BB^T^' T»W^^** ^^BB^r ^HHBHwrS^ ^^ ^^^^w^p ¦'•^^•w^sp^^^^PPi^^^^ PSP^-

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
LATER FR0M FT. DONELSON! i [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 26 February 1862

LATER FR0M FT. DONELSON!i i GREAT GALLANTRY OF UNION TROOPS! j : i i Oar Troop* Resolute!} Fighting against Triple their Number—Scenes Within the Captured Fortifications—A Salute Fired from the Foit. ST. LOUIS , February 18.—The Republican's Fort Donelson correspondent gives the following account of the ; fighting on Saturday. Yesterday j morning, just at dayli ght, a heavy j sortie was made by the garrison from ; the left portion of their works. This; attack was made upon the extreme! right wing of the Union army, where j it was weakest. j A part of General McClernand's' division , under Colonel Og lesby, consisting of his brigade, which was stationed there ; also Schwartz's and McAlister's batteries. The point was upon a ridge leading into the right redoubt, and was situated just above j the main fort. During the night the enemy could be heard busily at work, \ but, what at it was impossible to tell, ; as a dense thicket encompassed the : Union troops on every side, rend...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
From Missouri. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 26 February 1862

From Missouri. ST. LOUIS , February 19,1862.—The following will appear in the morning papers: HEADQUARTERS DEP'T. MISSOURI, 1 ST. LOUIS, Feb. 19. | The Major General Commanding the Department congratulates Flag Officer Foote, Brigadier Gen. Grant and the officers and men under their commands on the recent brilliant victories on the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers; but the war is not yet ended; prepare for new conflicts and new victories. Troops are concentrating from every direction, and we shall soon have an army which will be irresistible. The Union flag must be restored everywhere, and the enthralled Union in the South must be set free. The soldiers and sailors of the Great West are ready and willing, to do this. The time and places Save been determined on. Victory and g lory await the brave. By command of Major General HALLECK. N. H- M C L EAN, Asst. Adjt. Gen'l. , Serious Illness of the President' s Son—Territorial Governments in the 8o-th. WASHINGTON, Feb. 19,1862.—It ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Glorious News—General Price Captured. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 26 February 1862

Glorious News—General Price Captured. ST. Louis, Feb. 19, 10:30 a. m.—To Major General McClelian: General Curtis has captured Gen. Price, Col. Dorsey, Col. Pais and Capt. Judge of Price's staff. Signed II. W. HALLECK , Maj. Gen. About 5,000 infantry, two or three batteries of artillery, a large number of mules, wagons, and an immense quantity of baggage, stores, &c, left to-day for Cumoerland. Geo. Pope and staff left to dav for Cair.. * Tenirssee Boiling Mills Burned. Foxr DONELSON, Feb. 17.—The great lire which was seen up the river last night, was occasioned by the burning of the Tennessee Rolling Mills. Four mills were destroyed by our gunboats. The works had been used by the rebels for the manufacture of shot, shell and other material of war. It was an extensive concern.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
AUDITOB GENERAL. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 26 February 1862

AUDITOB GENERAL. The Editor of the "Genius of Liberty" thus chronicles his first meeting with '"Little Greene's" candidate for the Auditor Generalship. Aa he says nothing about his "good looks," we presume Brother Roddy is a poor judge of beauty, especially of the finer types. Aside from appearances, however, Mr. PAULEY has substantial claims to a nomination, and we have every reason to believe will be put forward as one of our standard-bearers in the next canvass. If he is, the Democratic thunder in this locality will be very loud about the 2d Tuesday of October. W. T. H. PAULEY. ''We lately had the pleasure for the first time, of meeting with Mr. Pauley, the exeditor of the Waynefburg Messenger, who is now strongly urged as a candidate for Auditor General, and if nominated would make a formidable candidate. The claims of Greene Co. and the fitness of Mr. Pauley for the position have already been laid before our readers, and so far as we can judge the prospects of Mr. Pauley ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Subscribers in the West, [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 26 February 1862

Subscribers in the West, We have a large number of subscribers in the West to whom we sent accounts several months ago, and who have, as yet, given { hem no attention. Will those who have not remitted the amount due us, be good enough to forward it by mail, at our risk, without further delay ? We need the money to meet our obligations, and ought to have it at once.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
THE MAHT AND THE FEW. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 26 February 1862

THE MAHT AND THE FEW. The only difference between governments lies in the consideration they respectively give the many and ihzfew.— Monarchies are based upon the assumption that the Almighty has made one class of men better than others,—that the masses are borne to serve, while the few come into the world, "booted and spurred," to "ride them legitimately, by the grace of God."— Republics are built upon other and radically different doctrines and ideas. They recognize and assert the national equality of the people, and their right to select their own rulers and make their own laws. The welfare and happiness of the masses, the "greatest good of the greatest number," constitute the aim of democratic governments, and not the grandeur and advantage of (what are too often,) the pretentious and arbitrary few. As a matter of course, governments predicated upon such different theories are "necessarily antagonistic ; and to this fact, and to none other, we attribute the hostility of Eu...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
JOLLIFICATION AND SEBENADE [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 26 February 1862

JOLLIFICATION AND SEBENADE The recent gratifying successes of our arms in Kentucky and Tennessee have kindled the patriotic ardor of our citizens of all parties and all opinions. Everybody that loves the Union and Constitution of our fathers (and who does not?) has been thanking Heaven and fortune for the signal triumphs that have attended our gallant lads in the Southwest, and all rejoice in hope of an early and signal overthrow of Southern treason and folly. Our inimitable "Martial Band," headed by the incomparable TEMPLE, greeted the public ear on Tuesday Evening last with a score of their happiest and liveliest tunes, and among others paid congratulatory visits to the Editors of the "Messenger," discoursing under our "rOof-trees" in capital style, the "Star-Spangled Banner," "Hail Columbia" and a multitude of soul-stirring aire. For their compliment we need not thank them,—they know OUT hearts are with them, aa they are with the country of our birth, of our hopes and of ou...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
m ^ m A GENEROUS GIFT. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 26 February 1862

m ^m A GENEROUS GIFT. We see by an exchange that the merchants of Chicago have presented to an editor of that city, a thousand dollars' worth of printing paper, as a New Year's gift. We have a strong inclination to move to that country. Editors are «vi dently appreciated there. Here. inateadof receiving presents, they make (fee pobHea present of several thonwMiadoHer^ Wrth of printed paper, every year; ' -&, ¦ . ~iUfr a w* to the sane lhi»j_ ram ¦¦** rtifift aaaer ttalslaliatta' mt^^jJSlUt-^ ' ***» aRsR'Sags*:^ * m Jfek * *^c' - ^ m-n't-M'

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
aajggMa»BBaaagBsgrs===gii nl' J l (HAVE OF STEPHEN A. DOUGLAS. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 26 February 1862

aajggMa»BBaaagBsgrs===gii nl' J l (HAVE OF STEPHEN A. DOUGLAS. Hon. Josira A. W RIGHT, of Indiana, pronounced an eloquent Eulogy on the lamented DOUGLAS in the State House at Indianapolis on the 8th of January. It was a just and merited tribute to one of the ablest and boldest statesmen of hie time and country, and one of the purest patriots. It concludes by the following allusion to the grave, the family and circumstances of the illustrious dead:— "I stood, not long since, by the grave of Douglas. There was hardly a rude lettered stone to mark the spot, It is near the shore of lake Michigan, and within the sound of the busy hum of the great city which his influence and enterprise nourished into strength and commercial im-¦ortance. las died "I have said that Doug poor. In the great State which be served so long and so faithfully, he did not own ground enough to serve him for a grave; and his devoted and true-hearted wife gave up, for his place of burial, the small lotof two ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
THE 00NTBA0T FBAUDS. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 26 February 1862

THE 00NTBA0T FBAUDS. In consequence of the alleged corruptions which has been exposed by the Committees of Congress, in the Quartermaster and Commissary Departments in New York and Philadelphia, the Secretary of War has determined that hereafter contracts will be given out in Washington.— No more private contracts will be made, but everything will be advertised and awarded " to the lowest bidder. The Secretary of War is determined to give this plan a fair trial. It is stated that twentyfive thousand coats made in Philadelphia and New York for the army have just been condemned. We trust. Mr. STANTON will go on in his good work of reform. The country goes with him, sustains him, and will remember him with gratitude. The past presents an abyss of horror. The fraud, the corruption, is of such a startling character that the country stands aghast. Let reform go on, let punishment he meted out, let who will suffer. 46S"-So says our republican neighbors of t he Pittsburgh Gazette, and...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
THE STOBT OF 00BBUPTI0N. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 26 February 1862

THE STOBT OF 00BBUPTI0N. The Government Contract Investigation Committee continue to unearth the vile transactions by which the United States Treasury has been robbed: They discover that the same horses have been twice sold to the Government ; superintendents and inspectors have been bribed to certify to horses, sometimes selling them to private individuals; that the enormous amount, paid by the War Department for transportation has induced strong competition among railroad companies, and that many Colonels in the West, moving their regiments East, have received each from $1,500 to $2,000 bonus; that some sutlers are making $3,000 profits per month ; that nearly all *,he sutlers south of the Potomac sell liquor, with the knowledge of the officers.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
BRECKINRIDGE'S POSITION. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 26 February 1862

BRECKINRIDGE'S POSITION. That notorious traitor, John C. Breckinridge, late Vice President of the United States, is a candidate for a seat in the Confederate Congress. He has published an address to the people of Kentucky, an nouncing hia candidacy, in which he "defines his position" thus :—"I am utterly opposed to a reconstruction of the old Government, or any measure which in the remotest degree tends in that direction.— For one, I shall never consent that peace shall be made until the very last of all the enemies of our liberty shall be driven from our hallowed soil, but from every foot of territory which, by its geographical positions, naturally belongs to the South." ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
'UNDEB WHICH KING, BENZ0NIAN?" [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 26 February 1862

'UNDEB WHICH KING, BENZ0NIAN?" Conversing to-day with an officer who had charge of the foraging expedition from Otterville, Mo., he informs us that if you meet a negro and ask him "Whose hay stacks are those ?" he will reply, "Massa's." "Well, what is he, Union, or Secesh ?" The reply invariably is, ''Hiassa, he's boff, he's boff."—Chicago Journal.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
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