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Elephind.com contains 658,475 items from Columbia Daily Spectator, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 3,057 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 8 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 6 May 1881

GENTLEMEN'S FURNISHING GOODS. Arnold, Constable & Cos. HAVE NOW OPEN THEIR FALL STOCK OF JVOVEL TIES 2A NECK DRESSINGS, HOSIERY, AND UNDERWEAR, LONDON STYLES, SUITINGS, TROWSERINGS, and OVERCOATINGS, FINE DRESS SHIRTS, COLLARS AND CUFFS, Muslin, Canton Flannel, and Flannel Night Shirts, BUCKSKIN UNDERWEAR, PAJAMAS, GLOVES, Silk and Linen Pocket Handkerchiefs, Robes de Chambre, Bath Robes, Smoking and Study Jackets, Silk and Woolen Mufflers, Umbrellas, &c., &c. Broadway, Corner igth Street. HunyadiJanos MINERAL WATER. THE BEST AND CHEAPEST NATURAL APERIENT. Superior to All Other Laxatives Apollinaris -' THE Q,UEEN OF TABLE WATERS,'' British Medical Journal, " L'EATT DE TABLE DES RETNES " Le Gaulois de Paris. ANNUAL SALE, 8,000,000 BOTTLES AND JUGS Of all Mineral Water Dealers, Grocers and Druggists.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Page 8 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 6 May 1881

Kidd Manufacturing Cos 107 West 23d Street, COR. SIXTH AVENUE, NEW YORK. MANUFACTURERS OF Athletic, Rowing and Gymnasium Outfits, ALSO Fine Dress Shirts, per doz. - - $24.00 & 30.00 Flannel and Cloth Traveling Shirts, - each $2.50 to 3.50 Yacht or Barge Shirts, " $2.50 to 3.50 Bicycle, Base Ball and Cricket Suits. Swimming and Bathing Suits. Uncle?' the Manage??ient of CHAS. W. KIDD. 1871 m New York Homoeopathic MEDICAL COLLEGE. OPHTHALMIC HOSPITAL BUILDING. Cor. 3rd Avenue & 23d St., New York. For information and announcements, Address. J. W. DOWLING. M. D., DEAN, 313 MADISON AVE.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
PATERNAL ATTENTIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 6 May 1881

PATERNAL ATTENTIONS. ANGELINA ( to EDWIN, 7 oho has been out all night ) .• What are you doing with those herrings in your hat ? EDWIN: Sh —don' make a row {hie). Don' yersee?—makin' 'quarium for th' shillrun.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 6 May 1881

WE regret to hear that the date of the Triumph has been probably fixed for the 27th of May. This is the night before the Intercollegiate Games and as such is unfortunately chosen. The committee are rather hampered in the matter by reason of the 28th, the evening of the Intercollegiate, being on Saturday, and Monday the 30th being Decoration day. We fancy, however, that most of the classes will have finished examinations by Thursday, and we see no very good reason why the Triumph should not take place on that evening. But, if the committee are unable to arrange for any other date, we sincerely trust that no intending competitor in the Games will endanger the athletic interests of the college by over indulgence the night before. /WUR readers will perhaps be surprised at another article on German Universities so soon following one on the same subject in the issue before the last. The present paper will be found to cover somewhat the same ground as the former one, but in greater detail....

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
The German University. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 6 May 1881

The German University. I. THE UNIVERSITY PROPER. TN the following few papers I shall endeavor to give a brief sketch of the German University, its sytem of instruction, and life thereat. A description of the University itself and of its constitution may serve as a fit introducti on. I need not fear being contradicted when I say that nothing out of German y corresponds to its Un i v e r sities. Many of those of other nations, no doubt, resemble them. But these stand forth prominently, sui generis. In fact they are so vastly different from American colleges, that it will be a long time and a gradual process alone, which will, in the end, produce the long wished for result of mak- ing American equal to German universities. The great difference between both will be discovered, not so much so in their constitution, as in their method of instruction. All the honor due to an university depends on this, and in this our colleges are found deficient. The German university is not, as in Englan...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
PIGER LABOR. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 6 May 1881

PIGER LABOR. (BROWN, who does not dance and has been standing talking to MLSS SMITH for two hours and a half at the ball of the season, thinks these large affairs are not all they are cracked up to be.)

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Somebody. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 6 May 1881

Somebody. THE thrush darts low in his onward flight, And his brown wing gleams in the morning light; But the thrush's wing is not so fair As the wavy softness of Somebody's hair. All day pipes the thrush his merry note, And the music pours from his tuneful throat; But his song makes not my heart rejoice Like the low-toned sweetness of Somebody's voice. The thrush's eye, as he poises afar, Is dimmed by the rays of the tiniest star; Not all the stars of the evening skies Can dim the brightness of Somebody's eyes. T. G. E.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
WILBUR of WILLIAMS:* A Simple Story of College Days. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 6 May 1881

WILBUR of WILLIAMS:* A Simple Story of College Days. by Cornicula. CHAPTER XVI. ' I A HE district school at Westfield was engaged in humdrum Friday afternoon declamations. A sweet form sat by the desk, an old, womanly girl. Her face was weary. As the sun stole in and glanced on the golden hair of the young teacher she turned an inattentive ear to the dullards, who with hands dove down into their pockets, spoke : "'l'll never chew tobacco ! No, it is a filthy weed; I'll never put it in my mouth,' said little Robert Reed" and pieces of like calibre. She was tired, O, so tired ; but the week's work was almost done, " Miss Argraves ! make Jimmy Scott stop. He's fir i 11' spitballs at me." Alice turned quietly : " Boys, I am unwell to-day; you must not annoy me." There was silence in an instant. One might wonder at the influence of a girl over that crowd, of all ages. The secret was —sympathy, that most lovable trait, the charm of all friendship. Alice was lost in reverie for several min...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 6 May 1881

Miss JALOUSIE —How do you suppose that Miss RIPPLE manages to entertain so many men at once ? Miss D'ENVIE —Oh ! easily enough. She just says something and then giggles and the men are all charmed.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Acrostic. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 6 May 1881

Acrostic. TO ESTELLE. ON SENDING HER A BOOK. E-vening has come and the bright stars are shining; S-oft on my heart fall their silvery beams, T-elling of eyes for whose glances I'm pining; E-yes that are haunting me ever in dreams. L-ife without starlight betokens death's reign ; L-ife without love —ah ! what is it but pain ? E-stelle, let this offering be not in vain.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
The Crews. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 6 May 1881

The Crews. to the very backward spring our crews have not been on the water as long as they generally are at this time of year, and in consequence the form is not as good as might be; but constant coaching from the launch will do much to correct the faults which are at present very glaring in some cases. The four which will row at Philadelphia for the Childs' cup is the same which represented us last year with the exception of Painter, whose place will be taken by Cowles, who stroked last year's freshman crew. The ages, heights and weights (stripped) of the crew are as follows : NAME AGE. HEIGHT. WEIGHT. Bow, Eldredge, 25, 5 ft. 6 in., 155 lbs. 2, Muller, 20, 6 ft., 167 lbs. 3, Van Sinderen, 21, 6 ft. in., 174 lbs. Stroke, Cowles, 19, 5 ft. 10 in., 154 lbs. On account of the turn in the Schuylkill course, the crew will pull with a starboard stroke, so that the bow can exert more power on the turn; and this has required Muller and Van Sinderen to change places, which puts them in mor...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
A MISUNDERSTANDING. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 6 May 1881

A MISUNDERSTANDING. (ROBINSON having accused Pat of stealing his purse finds it in another pocket and apologizes I) PAT —Ye naydn't apologize, Sir ; sure the two of us is after makin' a mistake, bedad, for whilst you tuk me for a thafe, I tuk you for a gintleman.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Class Suppers. TRIENNIAL MEETING OF THE CLASS OF SIXTY-NINE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 6 May 1881

Class Suppers. TRIENNIAL MEETING OF THE CLASS OF SIXTY-NINE. A MONG those classes which have permanent class organizations is the class of Sixtynine, which held its fourth triennial meeting on the evening of Thursday, the 28th of April, at the University Club. The class originally graduated with thirty-six members, several of whom have since died, four having been taken away during the past year. Of the twenty-seven members who live in New York, twenty-two were present on that occasion, as guests of Robert Lenox Belknap, one of their number. Letters of regret were read from those who were unable to attend. At the business meeting, the following gentlemen were elected to fill the class offices : President, R. L. Belknap ; First Vice-President, W. B. Cutting; Second Vice-President, H. C. Sturges ; Treasurer, D. B. Ogden ; Secretary, C. A. Peabody, Jr. ; Historian, W. Bartlett. At the meeting, which was large and enthusiastic, some indignation was expressed that the burial urn of the c...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CLASS OF SEVENTY-NINE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 6 May 1881

CLASS OF SEVENTY-NINE. THE third Annual Dinner of the Class of '79 took place on Friday evening, April 28th, and proved a very enjoyable occasion. Seventeen gentlemen sat down to dinner, and many who could not be present in corpore , signified their intentions, by note, to "be present in spirit." We noticed that the champagne seemed livelier than usual. The President of the class, Mr. Kellogg, sat at the head of the table, Mr. Barnum, Vice-Presi-dent, upon his left, and Mr. Lynch, Secretary and Treasurer, upon his right. The event of the evening was the presentation of the Baby cup to Mr. Daw, an event to which Mr. Wetmore did ample justice in one of his characteristic speeches, sparkling with wit, which set the table in a roar that shook Martinelli's to the base. He began somewhat thus: " Mr. Chairman and members of our co-fatherhood, we are assembled to present this symbol of our fatherly affection and interest, to our first-born baby boy." And after a speech to which my memory fa...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 6 May 1881

THE Inter-collegiate Cricket Association was formed on the 26th of April between Harvard, Columbia, Princeton, Trinity, and the University of Pennsylvania. A series of championship games were arranged, and officers were elected as follows : John B. Thayer, University of Pennsylvania, President ; W. Kane, Harvard, Secretary and Treasurer.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
The Days That are No More. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 6 May 1881

The Days That are No More. FROM THE GERMAN OF HEINE. MY CHILD, we also were children, Two children once on a day; We crowed in the empty hen house And hid ourselves under the hay. We cackled just as the hens do. And when the people went by — " Kikerikoo" —they surely thought It was the chickens' shrill cry. The old chests in the court yard With carpets we covered o'er, And then we dwelt there together ; What house could we wish for more? Our neighbor's old gray pet cat. From curiosity often came— We made her many curtesies And compliments the same. After her health we kindly asked, And for her children ten — We've asked the self same questions From many old cats since then. We often sat in sober chat, As we saw our elders do, And discussed how all was better In the years we had passed through; How love and trust and truthfulness Had vanished into the air, And oh, how dear all coffee was, And money, oh, how rare ! ***** Past are the sports of childhood, And all, alas, rolls by— Money...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
The Concert of the Yale Glee Club. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 6 May 1881

The Concert of the Yale Glee Club. ' J A HE Yale Glee Club gave their annual concert, for the benefit of the boat club, at Chickering Hall on the evening of April 21st. The programme, which was divided into two parts, containing eight numbers each, included the well known college songs, " 'Neath the Elms," "Amici," "Tarpaulin Jacket," "Bzt-Bzt," "Wake," " Upidee," etc.; two airs arranged for a quartette, and four solos. The concert was listened to by an audience which fairly filled the hall and enthusiastically encored eleven of the members. The club showed evidences of careful training and sang well together, but in some of the pieces seemed to rely for support too much on the tenor, Mr. Merrill. Mr. R. A. Peabody has succeeded Mr. Chamberlin as warbler, a position which he fills admirably. " The Hoarse Singers " and "The Long Day Closes," which were rendered by a quartette consisting of Messrs. Merrill, Lewis, Hay and Isham, gave the latter a good opportunity to display his full b...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Verses. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 6 May 1881

Verses. FOUND IN THE FIELD BOOK OF A GEOGRAPHICAL SURVEYOR WEST OF THE ONE HUNDREDTH MERIDIAN. ' c T A J HEN Moses led the chosen tribes V V Through Sinai's burning sand, And little Aaron went behind To urge the stubborn band, Though days were hot and fare was poor, They say that Moses never swore; So meek was he, so bland. But if he'd had to drive a mule Across the mountain snows, And when he switched her feel her foot Drop on his tender toes, It seems to me that Moses might Have crept away from camp at night And swore a swear—Who knows ?"

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
About College [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 6 May 1881

About College T7 IGHTY-THREE'S "Convivium" will probably be held at Hamilton Park. THE Glee Club sang in Brooklyn on the 27th, at a private entertainment. " COME, Charley, let's go off on a " toot ! " Charley, who is rather Frenchy : "Aw, naw ! pas du tout! '' IF the Brooklyn Bridge should ever break down we will certainly blame it to the man who said last week that it was " a work of immense magnitude and stupendous preponderosity." "MY darling," simpered a Columbia soph., " believe me, I will love you 'till —'till our college gets an athletic ground ! " He was accepted. THE game of chess between the Haverford and Columbia clubs, by correspondence, begun March 18, 1880, resulted in the resignation of Haverford, April 6th, 1881. THE New York World , in a recent sketch of the life of Beaconsfield says : " There is, however, some trace of a Benjamin Disraeli, about 1800, in Dublin, a lottery-office keeper and moneylender, who, it has been suggested, was an uncle of the late Earl." i I...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
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