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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

38 The Indian Advocate ized and preserved his race. There is not a single extinct tribe of Indians whose extermination is due to French or Spanish cruelty and barbarism. How does that compare with the early history of the colonization along the Atlantic coast by the Pilgrims and Puritans, whose present-day decendants know so much about French cruelties and Spanish atroc ities, whilst they extol their Indian-exterminating forefathers as the only good thing that ever struck the shores of the West ern continent. What have the French and Spanish done for the In dian? The brilliantly successful missionary work of the French Jesuits in Canada and in the Northwest is pretty well known, at least among Catholics in general. Names like those of Father Jogues, Brebeuf, Marquette, De Smet, etc., have be come household words. They are names expressive of the highest type of heroism and self-sacrifice; names which repre sent not only hundreds, but thousands of converted, insructed and civilized C...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

The Indian Advocate. 39 inal inhabitants as the parts in which we live. Cruelties, in deed, were practiced, but they did not form the general rule." That is to say, cruelties were seldom and far between, and against the express laws of the Spanish rulers, whereas in New England men like Eliot and Penn are isolated figures, and form the exceptions to the general rule. "The part taken by the missionaries," Mr. Shea goes on to say, "ever the steadfast friends of the Indian, has been singularly misrepre sented, and they seldom figure in English accounts unless as persecutors. Yet never did men more nobly deserve a niche in the temple of benevolence than the early and later Spanish missionaries." Why? What have they done for the Indian? "To give even a skelton of Spanish missionary work in the two Americas," says Mr. Lummis, "would fill several volumes." In 1617 three years before Plymouth Rock there were already eleven churches in use in New Mexico." Speaking of Pecos, he says: "Above t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

40 The Indian Advocate. that the Indians were much better treated than they them selves. The so-called "blood baths and butcheries," which the Spaniards are said to have perpetrated, when studied up and sifted down according to the latest discoveries and researches, generally lose much of their crimson dye, like red bunting on a raiuy Fourth of July. They are, as a rule, overdrawn by about two-thirds, and liberally fringed with extras, and even when reduced to their actuality, are now acknowledged to have been necessary military actions. Let us try to imagine what would have been the result if our own "Howling-Wilderness" Smith, or "Water-and-Bottle-Cure" Waller had been in the boots of Coronado or Cortez, or if the Spaniards had been of the type of the "pig-sticking" lancers, employed by England in the late Boer war, or if the Spanish Padres had been of the same stamp as grim old Increase Mather, the New England Puritan preacher, who after the sickening massacre of the Pequods, in ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

The Indian Advocate. 41 Bersabee." They have been accused of burning piles and heaps of historical documents and records, and of destroying fine and irreplaceable works of art, etc. This is what one Reau Campbell has to say: "What might have served to enlighten upon the history of the earlier races that inhabited the land (Mexico) was destroyed by the fanatics, who saw in the temples they found evidences of civ ilization almost superior to their own, and of a religion so nearly identical, that it seemed only a creed of the one they professed; the jealous bigotry that threw down the graven stones and tore the pictured parchments to fragments, wiped out volumes of history and placed bloody chapters in their stead:" And again: "Whatever of chronological data there may have been in the picture writings of the Aztecs was de stroyed in the fanatical fires that destroyed the temples of Tenochtitlan." And the following passage, which is, indeed, a gem of petrified ignorance: "As we read . t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

42 The Indian Advocate. immense lakes or oceans, and he can tell you, almost to the gallon, how much water they contain. Let them clean their lenses; let them forget all else, but that they are men, who are expected to have nerve and character enough to tell the truth impartially, manfully and in a straightforward manner. In order that they may do this, let them study their subject before writing on it, and let them use the proper, truthful and authentic sources, and not be like an idiot, who leads his horse into a millinery store to have it shod. Let them think, that they do not know it all, that there is still something for them to learn, and that their yellow intellectual X-rays are not the only thing which are enlightening the race of Adam. Let them lock up their fenced-in sanctums of science and wisdom in the knowledge-puffed East, and if they are writing on Western subjects, let them come "Out West," or, at least, consult the papers and pamphlets, the records and reports, etc....

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

The Indian Advocate. 43 their gods were false, were mere puppets, their religious ideas gross halucinations, and their ceremonies empty humbug. The Spanish Padres were, indeed, apostles, imitators of the great Apostle of the Gentiles, who, "in journeying often, in perils of waters, in perils of robbers, in perils from the Gen tiles, in perils in the city, in perils in the wilderness, in perils in the sea, in perils from false brethren, in labor and painful ness, in many watchings, in hunger and thirst, in many fast ings, in cold and nakedness," led on the Indian, step by step, until they had finally achieved the conversion of a continent and a,half of savages to Christianity. "Never did any other people anywhere," says Mr. Lummis, "complete such a stu pendous missionary work." And the life and morals of the neophites were such that even to this day, those times are re ferred to as the "Golden Age of the Missions." What have the Spaniards done for the Indians with re gard to science ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

4F" 44 The Indian Advocate. There are collections existing of articles manufactured by Indians, who were pupils of the Padres In these collections are found chains, bear-traps, hammers, pulleys, flat irons, scissors, plowshares, scales for measuring gold, scales for measuring rations, nails, cow-bells, hub bands, bits of almost all tools, and although they did not work with the tools and machines, nor with the facilities and improvements of mod ern times, yet their work has been pronounced by competent judges just "as good as any workman can turn out now." Bits and bridles of iron, inlaid with silver; saddles with fancy leather-work, and clever hand-carvings; large copper bowls, handsomely finished and exquisitely decorated: beauti ful hand-carved chairs, benches, ballustrades, confessionals, altars, etc., the remains of oil presses, flour mills, winepresses, blacksmith shops, saw-mills, and work shops by the old Mis sion buildings show that almost every trade has been taught and pr...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

The Indian Advocate. 45 pains to raise up our own aborigines to such helpfulness to themselves and to human knowledge!" I would like very much to dwell longer upon the work of the Spaniards in the Southwest and Mexico. Nothing can be more interesting for American readers than detailed de scriptions of the hero-soldiers and hero-priests who first lighted the lamp of Christianity in the New World; of the benefits, civil and social, religious and moral, which they brought to the Indian; of- the knowledge and art, the trades and crafts, which once flourished in "the new Kingdom of St. Francis," but this would fill many volumes. However, this short sketch will, I think, give the reader some idea of what the Spaniards have done for the Indian. And now, one more glance at the Spanish pioneers. Not only have they been described as human fiends, devoid of every nobler sentiment or motive; not only have their mis sionaries been set down as fanatics, who made immense bon fires of historical re...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

46 The Indian Advocate. of men like Hodge, Lummis, Bandelier, Morgan and Win ship have made the path of present day students moderately easy." And Mr. Lummis writes: "One very important feat ure must not be lost sight of. Not only did these Spanish teachers achieve a missionary work unparalleled elsewhere by others, but they made a wonderful mark on the world's knowl edge. Among them were some of the most important histor ians America has had; and they were among the foremost scholars in every intellectual line, particularly in the study of languages. They were not mere chroniclers, but students of native antiquities, arts and customs such historians in fact, as are paralleled only by those great classic writers, Herodo tus and Strabo. In the long and eminent list of Spanish missionary authors were such men as Torquemada, Sahagun, Motolinia, Mendieta, and many others; and their huge vol umes are among the greatest and most indispensible helps we have to the study of the real history...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

The Indian Advocate. 47 A GENTLEMAN. I I knew him for a gentleman By signs that never fail; ' His coat was rough and rather worn, His cheeks were thin and pale A lad who had his way to make, With little time for play I knew him for a gentleman By certain signs today. He met his mother on the street; Off came his little cap. My door was shut; he waited there Until I heard his rap. He took the bundle from my hand, And when I dropped my pen He sprung to pick it up for me, This gentleman of ten. He does not push and crowd aloug; His voice is gently pitched; He does not fling his books about As if he were bewitched. He stands aside to let you pass, He always shuts the door; He runs on errands willingly To forge, and mill, and store. He thinks of you before himself, He serves you if he can, For in whatever company The manners make the man. At ten or forty 'tis the same, The manner tells the tale, And I discern the gentleman By signs that never fail, Afarravel Sct7igsler, i9p t Jp La Roche...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

48 The Indian Advocate. Sow good services, sweet remembrances will grow from them. "Well, Jacob, do you think you'll be a better boy next year?" Jacob "I hope so, sir; I've just begun to take cod liver oil." , Strength must be found in thought or it will never be found in the words. Big sounding words, without thoughts corresponding, are effort without effect. Let us teach the young the great harmonic' truths and be liefs by which we ourselves have been made human, and pass lightly over errors, disputes, division and hatreds. Let it be our aim to make them men of good-will, not partisans Bish op Spalding. W. T. Hall, possibly better known as "Biff" Hall, figures in many stores told about Chicago One day Hall went into a restaurant where modest prices prevail and where there is no printed bill of fare. The waiter was attentive and profuse. "I have deviled kidneys, pigs' feet and calves' brains," he an nounced glibly when he had filled a glass with ice water and given the table cloth ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

Tiif. Indian Advocate. 49 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE : SACRED HEART MISSION. OKLAHOMA. 1 A Monthly Review Under the Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary, St. Michael and St. Benedict. Approved by our Regular Superiors. TBRMfl OF SUBSCRIPTION! Single Copies 15c. Annual $1.00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. . 75c. Foreign Si. 25. Entered as Second-class Matter at Sacred Heart. Oklahoma. I'HIVILKQKSl i. Eery Subsi riber and Benefactor will participate in all the merits, prayers and good works of the Religious- of Sacred Heart Abbey. a. A solemn High Mass is sung every First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors. 3. A Conventual Mass is offered every First Saturday of the month for our departed Friends, Subscribers and Benefactors. 4. Eery year, in the month of Scptemner, two Solemn Masses are sung for our Bene factors, one for the Living and one for the Dead. AM. KKMITTAVOPt. CO NTKIIIUTIONH AND ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

5 The Indian Advocate. in it. Every day is a little life, and our whole life is but a day repeated. Those, therefore, that dare lose a day are danger ously prodigal; those that misspend it, desperate. Censure and criticism never hurt anybody. If false they cannot hurt you, unless you are wanting in mannly character; and if true, they show a man his weak points and forewarn him against failure and trouble. To put one's self in another's place is the surest way for a sincere man to substitute sympathy for selfishness and con sideration for a broader good in place of his own preference. And that is the spirit that needs to actuate the individual in in his social relations. With most of us our soul is as a musical instrument in unskilled or half skilled hands; but from which trained fingers can draw forth melody and sweetness. We are too slothful to go through the preliminary drudgery of practice. Import unate for some little present gratification, we pick out tunes by ear, and never be...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

The Indian Advocate. 51 spread over every province. Of this number, 70,394 belong to some religious denomination, divided into 41,813 Catho lics, 16,129 Episcopalians, 10,273 Methodists, 807 Presby terians and 1,362 other Christian bodies. The religion of 12,300 odd is unknown, and 16,667 are still pagans. An evil soul is like a villian with a smiling cheek; a goodly apple rotten in the heart; O, what a goodly outside falsehood hath! Ben "Who is that fat man over there?" Gabe "That! Why that's the man with 'brain of feath ers and heart of lead' who invented the wormless chestnut." The kindest and happiest pair, Will find occasion to forbear; And ever day, in which they live, ' To pity, and perhaps forgive. Kate "There goes a man with a great mind." Willie "He doesn't look like it. In what way?" Kate "He minds his own business and that's a great mind. Spire "I see the Government is establishing free barber shops out West for the Indians." Pat "Well, it is due them. They gave the earl...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

52 H f i. The Indian Aia'ocatk. George Washington -"-- I VT. who wnulrl Hpvp his nnmf f"n finwn to future 11 ages must look to the human race to perpetuate his memory. It is a fact, illustrated in every day life, that in all that concerns the appreciation of personal character or ability the judgment of a people is quicker, keener and more reliable than that of the most intellectual person among them. The highest and most reliable judgments seem to be confined to people as a whole. It is said that "the perceptions of a public are as subtly sighted as their passions are blind," and when, after due con sideration and time, it once pronounces a judgment, we take it before that of the individual. It is by such a process that whenever a great man appears among us we look to the pub lic for a recognition of his ability, and set down its conclusion as certain and infallible. It is by suoh a process we must consider Washington. Our insight is not keen enough to penetrate that nature which h...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

The Indian Advocate. 53 does every American heart swell with pride at the sound of his name? What claim has this one man upon the affections of our people that we, on every 22d of February, gather in our respective localities and there, by word and sign, show that we esteem and honor this one man more than all our couutry's other heroes? Why? Because he was the nerve and sinew, the courage and life of our Continental army which won for us the liberty we now enjoy; because he made out of a handful of poor peasant soldiers those who withstood the on slaughts of England's fighting lions; because it was he, and he alone, who changed the opinions of our people, banished their doubts and fears, and laid the foundation of this nation, which is the wonder and envy of all European powers; be cause he brought order out of chaos and guided this ship of state until it was well launched upon the sea of prosperity. The people of other nations may say we worship the almighty dollar, that we are se...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

m 54 The Indian Advocate. against the injustice of England's taxation, in confusion and disorder. Everyone knew that in their present condi tion it was useless to contend with mighty England in war. They gave up to despair; all hope was lost. Such was the condition of affairs when Washington assumed his duties as commander. His appointment was hailed with joy and glad ness, confidence took the place of despair, hope of success re turned and the army looked up to their commander like chil dren to a father. He was like a star in the darkness, a beacon to the sailor. They rallied around bim; they placed in his hands their lives, their liberties, their all, and, like a true father, he never betrayed their trust. He immediately set about raising and organizing an army that would be well fit to compete with the enemy, for he well knew the lion across-the seas, and after brushing by many obstacles, he was success ful. On his passage from town to town, he was hailed as the deliverer, showin...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

The Indian Advocate. 55 break between either. Of his military genius it is not necessary to speak. Suf fice it to say the battles that he won, the quick, rapid move ments which brought victory after victory, his retreats and advances without great loss, are ranked among the greatest stragetical movements that history has recorded. Never dur ing that long seige was he outwitted or outgeneraled by the enemy. What went on in that mighty mind during those seven years we will never know; what came from it is the liberty we now enjoy. The war was, by nature, a long one, one in which any blunder or mistake would prove fatal. He had not only the enemy to contend against, but it was neces sary to change the opinions of our people. Though waring with England, tbey still clung to the idea of her side of sov ereignity, but in seven years Washington changed those opin ions and made out of our colonists a distinct American people. The moral qualities of Washington were of a very high order. He wa...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

56 Tiik Indian Advocatk. passed, and on the 15th of September, about six months be fore the expiration of his term of office he resigned his posi tion and retired to the quiet of his rural Mt. Vernon home. On the 12th of December he took cold from exposure on his farm, and on Saturday, December 14, 1799, he expired. Thus ended the career of one of the greatest heroes that this or any other nation has ever seen. "Living, he taught that character, not birth, Alone, can constitute exalted worth, And dying left unto remotest time The grand example of a life sublime; l A wonderful bold and grand career For sages to admire and kings to fear," T. L. L. in the Niagara Index. . t2t O "He calls his baby 'Coffee.' " "What a name! What does he call it that for?" Because it keeps him awake at night." "Pa," said little Willie, who was reading a treatise on phrenology, what is the bump of destructiveness?" "Why er a railroad collision, I suppose." "Here, I asked for pie, not a paving stone," "Youn...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1903

The Indian Advocate. 57 The Angle of Pity. OR A if vrmMI ct-nr -rnicrVif nn trrnit- urov Vinmo I'll give you one of those pies you like. I'm go ing to bake today, and it won't be much extra trouble." The speaker stood in the doorway of a large farm house, and waited with her arms akimbo, till the answer came ringing back, (a jubilant "Yes, I'll stop in,") from the group or children hurrying to school. The hard face smiled a little, a grim sort of a smile, and then the door was shut, and the day's work was begun. A soldier, with any empty sleeve, and traces of pain and hunger in his face, tramped wearily up the country road, and with a sigh that was almost a groan, threw himself under one of the trees, and lay utterly exhausted beneath the protecting branches until the lines of suffering were smoothed away, and kindly sleep spread her mantle above him. The boys and girls, coming up the lane from the school house, paused, with pitying glances at the prostrate form, and stole away whis...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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